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January 18, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UA MORGA STATES
OPERA- BOOK GOOD

*it * * * *
fAT THE THFEATER:'
*
*i lae stic-Vsaude-ille,
S Years of t':'he l" iut,"Al

RES FAVORABLY
IRETTO$ PRODUCED
OTHER COLLEGES

WITH
AT

Si
x
x
*I
'g

vichigan's 1917 opera book com-
s favorably with those of any other
ege with which I have been af-
ted," was the way Director Charles
gan who has conducted operas at
iceton, Yale, West Point, and Penn-
ania, characterized the book for
year's Michigan Union opera, when
rviewed yesterday. "Of course," he
:inued, "in the eastern schools a
e is awarded to the author of the
sen book. Pennsylvania for in-
ce offers an annual prize of $250,
rou see this is a stimulus for the
to put their best into the pro-
ion. The author, Mr. Pardee, has
luced a clever book, one that any
ege man might be proud of and
that I am sure will make up into
ever production.
[am well satisfied, indeed, with the
things are going; last year every-
g was new to me and it took some
to get acquainted with conditions
. This year, however, I have been
to go right ahead. When I re-
after examinations I can im-
lately start work training the cast
chorus. I have already revised the
lario so that it is practically in its
form, and have outlined the mu
so that by Feb. 10, it should be
pleted. Things are in infinitely
er shape this year than they were
year at this time.
he aextended influence of last
's opera is shown by the fact that
ral days ago I received a letter
a one of the large scenery com-
.es of Chicago asking if they might
e a bid for the scenery for this
' -pera-. Yesterday their repre-
ative came on to see me and I out-
,the general outline of the scenery
nim. Previously we have always
to seek bids from various com-
es in Detroit, so you see the effect
od opera one year has on the next

LANE AIIL)L WORK RSHED ;
TO BE FISIIED NEXT MONTH
ias,flor, antI Panels Already in
PUk'; Provide Room or 40

*:
*

'4
~X rcat1.e- 'I'l~~'da IlflTaL iii '~TI~c
Vixen."

Work on the new "Y" building is
taking on an added hurry and bustle
this week. The contractors are put-
tin; urmre men on the job and it
looks as if the front steps would be
wearing away under the steps of
many students about the middle of
i1ebruary.,
The building of Lane hall has been
most peculiar. It has be.n finished
many tires, according to the news-
papers. Put with the new marble
Woct treads on the iron stairs already
in place, the beautiful oak floor swept
clean from the rubbish that a carpent-

I

er leaves, and the oak panelling of the
second floor already in place, the fin-
ish looks near.
Up on the third floor, where the
moving picture machine will be in-
stalled and the assenmblies will be
held, the workmen are now putting a
mahogany finish on the woodwork.
The walls are being finished in white
ivory. This combnation makes the
auditorium both ligt and attractive.
Provision bas been made for mete
who are working their way through'
school in the new building. On the
fourth floor, on each side of the bal-
cony, are two large dormitories. These
will be furnished with beds and at
least O men-can sleep in each room.

* * * * * * * * * ,6 * *o

AT THI WIIITNEY

"The Girl Who Smiles," the musical
comedy which enjoyed 200 perform-
ances of real prosperity at the Long-
acre theater in New York and was sub-
sequently most cordially endorsed by
the Boston critics, and which comes
to the Whitney theater next Saturday,
Jan. 20, matinee and night, seems to
be particularly rich in number of
prominent comedians. Among those
having the greater responsibility as
fun-providers may be mentioned Le-
land Stearns, who impersonates the
character of "Theodore," out of which
he manages to extract food for hearty
laughter. Previous to his member-
ship in "The Girl Who Smiles" ranks
Mr. Stearns was seen in the part of
"Halloway," in the "Man Who Owns
Broadway" with Raymond Hitchcock.
It is claimed that in "The Girl Who
Smiles" he is allowed wider. scope,
which has a real plot filled with hu-
man interest.

Provision has been made, also,
the employment bureau secretary.
room on the third floor has been
aside for him.

for
A
set

AUFIiI4T~i ViS I ~ >~if~il ' .YMT~AT TE1~
ERN ~l~rt~l''Y O I-lti)A Ni~ITIT LTASTN

NORT/HEST-

d

"FAIRAND:WARMER"

So great was the success of "Fair
and Warmer," the Avery Hopwood
farce of temperature and temperament,
which Selwyn and company will pre-
sent at the Whitney theater tonight,
that before it had reached its first
hundredth performance at the Harris
theater, New York, there was a de-
man~d for it from every quarter of the
country, and its fame has been carried
from coast to coast and from the gulf
to' Canada by the out-of-town mem-
bers of its capacity audiences.
Its success was so instantaneous and
;o unceasing during its year in New
York, that a nation-wide interest was
created. It will come here with a
typical Selwyn and company cast of
excellent farceurs, who will give the
fullest flavor to the Hopwood lines and
situations.

MICHIGN RDEBATE TEA ,Il
TO MEET NORTH1-r. .. [ST e N
.9I ' I
AFFIRMATIVE TRIO AVVES T RVS
3iORNINC FOR 1YAM$TON
SAT 8:12 O'CLOCl
Michigan's affirmative debating team
will leave Ann Arbor for Evanston,
Ill., at 8:12 o'clock this morning,
where they will meet Northwestern
university in the annual Central league
debate. The personnel of the team is:
I S. Toplon, '19L, W. P. Sandford, '19,
and G. C. Claassen, '17L.
The question to be debated is the
inheritance tax question, and Michi-
gan this year sends her aflirmative
team away and has her negative team
debate at home.
Michigan's debaters have all had
much experience and have also been
active in other L'niverity orensic ac-
tivlties.
Toplon was born in Lake Linden,
Mich., and attended the University of
Chicago high school, which he rep-
resented three successive years in de-
bate. He was a member of the team
which last year won from Wisconsin
and is a member of Delta Sigma Rho,
the honorary debating axid oratory fra-
ternity.
W. P. Saidford bears the distinction
of being the first sophomore to repre-
sent the University in a varsity debate
for many years. ie was born in
Kewanee. Ill., und for three successive
years he was a member of their de-
bating team. He will gain member-
ship in Delta Sigma Rho by virtue of
his participation in this debateA.
G. C. Claassen is for the third time

dIebating for Michigan, having already
appeared in winning teams against
Wisconsin and Illinois. He was born
in Grundy Center, Ia., and took his
preparatory work in Fort Scott, Kans.
lie was graduated from Findlay col-
, l>indlay, ., with an A. B. de-
gr e, and while a studefit of that col-
leiw ht participated in both oratorical
t debating activities. He is also a
Ihi a Sigma Rho, attaining member-
ship after his first varsity debate.
'1he d baters will each receive a
tsiionial of $50, and the Alger gold
medal. given by Mrs. Alger in memory
of the late Senator Alger.
'':?l1iNE 1 COUNCILS TO GIVE
SEtiES OF WEEKLY PARTIES
Saturday night of this week the first
I' a series of weekly dances to be
given throughout the rest of the school
year by the student council and wom-
eu's judiciary council will be held in
the Barbour gymnasium parlors.,
The great demand for dancing space
which the Union is unable to satisfy
ha been the prime factor in bringing
ab(ut these dances, yet there is no in-
iention of interfering vwith the Union's'
rei :lar Saturday night affairs, which=
will be given as usual.
A five-piece orchestra furnished by
Ike Fisher will be on hand to guide
the dancers in their steps.
All proceeds a the dances are to go
o charity, the making of profit from
them not being considered by the coun-
c . he princ of admission has been
ect at 50 cnts per couple.
The oommitt~e in charge is under.
he chairmanship of Howard S. Hatch.
C, for the student council. and Miss
Anita M. Kehey, '7 for the wom
en s udiciary council.

THE DELTA CAFE MANAGEMENT
ANNOUNC ES
Excellent facilites for catering.
We take complete charge of dinner and dancing
parties and give service which is
SUPERB
R. B. ZEBBS, Manager
Call us for estimates 1370-W

MID=WVINTER SALE

fa

Of

Bostonian and Florsheim Footwear

With shoe prices soaring, and many styles costing more today
at rvholesale than we are asking at retail, it would be folly to
reduce the prices of a single pair except that we are badly
overstocked on some lines; and with'spring shipments soon due
to arrive me must reduce our present stock.

organ will remain in Ann
riday when he will leave
hia to take charge of the
taged by the Mask and
the University of Penn-1

CAM IPUS BOO tEY

308 So.
State St.

inia.

ALLMAND & FORSYT HE
P. S.-By buying at this sale will enable you to
$1.00 to $2.00 per pair on your spring footwear for
doubt prices are going much higher.

215 $o.
Main St.
save from
without a

OFESSORS TO ATTEND
PATRIOTISM CONGRESS

AT THE (G1RRICK
Detroit

i

TO

E 1IMEMBERS OF FACULTY
REPRESENT MICHIGAN AT
WASHINGTON

Five members of the faculty have
been appointed to represent the Uni-
versity at a congress of constructive
patriotism which will be held in the
city of Washington, Jan. 25 to 27, un-
der the auspices of the National Se-
curity league. Dean Henry M. Bates,
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, Prof. S. L.
Bigelow, Prof. W. H. Hobbs, and Dr.
J. F. Scott will make up the University
delegation.
Fifty other universities are to send
delegates and it is hoped that through'
the unified efforts of the members of
the Security league and prominent
educators of the country that the con-
gress will lead to the adoption of un-
iversal military training and service.
Through the assistance of university
representatives it is planned to create
a university extension or lecture sys-
tem on patriotic topics, and a special
committee headed by Prof. Albert
Bushnell Hart of Harvard University,
will hold sessions during the congress
for furthering this plan.
Governor Ferris while still in office,
appointed three delegates to represent
the State of Michigan at the congress
and Mr. Gardner S. Williams, lately a
professor in the University, has been
appointed by the National Security
league, as their delegate.
The program which covers the top-,
ics, "America's Present Needs," "Am-
erica's Position as a World Power,"
"Americanization," "Governmental
and Individuai Efficiency," "Universal
Military Training and Service," "Pre-
paredness," and "Patriotism Through
Education," each treated at a separate
session, will be discussed by such men
as, Hon. Elihu Root, William Roscoe
Thayer, Rear Admiral Bradely A.
Fiske, U. S. N., Hon. Theodore Roose-
velt, Hon. John Purroy Mitchell and
others of equal prominence in the na-
tion's affairs. The meeting will close
with a banquet at the new Willard
hotel.
Other members of the Ann Arbor
branch of the National Security
league who expect to attend the meet-
ings are advised to notify the Chair-
man Prof. W. H. Hobbs or the secre-

Life, love and youth, that eternal
triangle that is as old as the aeons of
time, will again be most charmingly
pictured at the Garrick theater, De-
troit, next week, by that presentor of
bewitching musical comedies, Arthur
Hammerstein, in his newest produc-
tion, "Katinka.' This play with its
delightful music by Rudolph Friml, itN
sparkling comedy by Otto iauerbach,
its captivating lyrics and sprightly
dances has made an impression on
theater-goers, both here and in the
eastern and western metropolis.
The company to be seen at the Gar-
rick is the same that figured in it
here before and at the long run at
the Casino, New York, and comes back
to us from its successful engagement
at the Garrick theater in Chicago. It
is, as heretofore, headed by T. Roy
Barnes, a Detroit home-town boy, and
a versatile comedian of the somewhat
different sort.
AT TlHE MAJESTIC
Those who have had'an opportunity
of witnessing Boyle Woolfolk's suc-
cess, "Six Little Wives," which opens
at the Majestic tonight, have com-
mented upon the seeming facility with
which the sextette, from which tlhe
show takes its title, speak the various
linesin foreigt language allotted to
theim.Thereby hangs a tale. The "Si,
Little Wives" is by Will Hough author
of "The Time, the Place, and the Girl,"
"The Stubborn Cinderella" and nearly
a score of other big Chicago musical
comedy successes.
On the arrival of the "Six Little
Wives," they are supposed to speak
their lines in Russian, Italian, German
Turkish, Japanese and Scotch respect-
ively. Hough provided the lines.
The Russian, Turkish and Japanese
languages proved the hardest and re-
quired an entire week for the young
women to attain proficiency.
Regular Assembly at the Armory
Saturday night. 18-19

AllCloth ing, Including
the Famous
3n AKm

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a~ wR : j' . Ar 11 11 \r11 !

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Suits a,
and sepai

nd Overcoats
rate trousers at
Co.
"eet

:

N . F.: Allcn
211 South Main Stn

Alarm clocks, $1.00 up.
Jeweler, 113 South Main St,

Chapman,
tues-eod

Children's aancing class at the
Packard. Fridays, 3:30 P. M. 16tf
For results advertise in The Mich-

a
;.,;

!. -

w

, '

W. T. Barbour. igan Daily.

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