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January 17, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-17

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FHE WEATHER
TrODiAY

r

rW41

:4Iatij

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND - IlT
WIRE SERVICE

. __

--- 4

VOL. XXVII. No. 79.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1917.

PRICE FIVE CEN'

I

C RE HUGHES
DEFEAT TO- SMALL
G, 0. P. COTERIE
CLAl4 LEADERS SEEK TO "FUR-
THER THEIR OWN
ENDS"
SAYS CLIQUE SHIFTS
BLAME UPON WILSON
Statement Holds That Leaders Tried
to Force Resignation of Na-
tional Chairman
New York, Jan. 113-Everett Colby,
New Jersey Progressive, and George
W. Perkins, former national Progres-
she chairman, signed a statement
charging Hughes' defeat to a little
coterie of Republican leaders seeking
to control the party to "further their
own en-ds."
The statement named these men as
members of the coterie: Murray Crane
of Massachuseits, .aies H. Hemen-
way of Indiann, William Barnes, Jr.,
of New York, Alvah Martin of Virginia,
H. D. Estabrook of New Hampshire,
Sam Perkins of Washington, William
. Crocker of California, Governor Gil-
ete of Calfornia, McArthur of Ore-
gon, and Lafe Gleason of New York
The statement charged the "coterie"
with trying to "shift responsibility for
liE egies' defeat from their own should-
era, where it rightfully belongs, to
Wilcox's"; alleged the coterie was
seeking "to force Wilcox's resigna-
tion."
New York, Jan. 16.-George W. Per-
kins "blew the lid off" Republican na-
tional committee's executive meeting
today in a lengthy statement declar-
ing they were seeking to force the re-
tirement of National Chairman Wilcox
and trying to "shift responsibility for
Hughes' defeat from their own should-
ers where it rightfully belongs to those
of Wilcox." Perkins' statement was
signed also by Everet Colby of New
Jersey.
The statement charged existence of
a conspiracy among Hemenway of In-
diana, Martin of Virginia, Estabrook
of New Hampshire, ex-Governor Gil-
lette of California, McArthur of Ore-
gon, and Lafe Gleason of New York to
"keep control of the machinery of the
Republican party present and pros-
pective."
Make Charges Against Leaders.
Gleason, the statement charged, is the
acknowledged representative of Wil-
liam Barnes, Jr., of New York, while
Gillette is a pronounced reactionary
Republican and a bitter opponent of
Hiram Johnson. Hemenway, it was
stated, is leader of the coterie. "Hem-
enway and his associates have for a
long time been secretly circulating
stories reflecting on Chairman Wilcox
and charging him with responsibility
for having lost the national election,
whereas they themselves are solely and
wholly responsible for the defeat of
Mr. Hughes.
Tried to Oust Chairman Wilcox.
The real reason for the opposition
of these men to Chairman Wilcox is
the fact that he has tried in every
way to liberalize the Republican party
and make it responsive to the wishes
of the rank and file of the party. These
very men know only too well that if
Chairman Wilcox succeeded in his en-
deavors they instead of him would be
shorn of power.

Prof. Eich to Lee at Ithaca
Under the auspices of the Univer-
sity extension department, Prof. Louis
Eich of the oratory department will
give "Readings from Mark Twain" at
Ithaca, Mich., tomorrow night.
H. V. W)aun Gives Extension Lecture
"Types an'1 Scenes of Constantinople"
is the subject of an address to be given
by Mr. H. V. Wann of the French de-
partment before the Grand Rapids
junior high school tomorrow.
Senior L.ts to Hold 'feeting Today
Senior lits will meet at 4 o'clock
today, in room 101, economics build-
ing.
President H. Gray Muzzy, stated
yesterday that he had some important
announcemeits to make, and that the
class would also choose the professor
or instructor in the literary college to
whoin they wsh to dedicate their sec-
tLion in the 1917 Alichiganensia1.

, .-_ '
r

Revenues Swelled
to $525,000,000
Add to Fnrmer Total by Excess Profits
and Additional Inheritance
Taxes
Washington, Jan. 16.-Revenues to-
taling $525,000,000 will be raised by1
means of an additional inheritance tax
and an excess profits tax of eight per
cent on corporations and co-partner-
ships, including bond issues, the house
ways and means committee decided
today. The decision has the approval
of the president and Secretary of the
Treasury McAdoo. Chairman Kitchin
was authorized to draft a bill incor-
porating the decision. Inheritance
taxes will be increased by a total ofa
$22,000,000.I
A special tax of from one-half perf
cent on $50,000 estates to 14 and 15
per cent on huge estates will be levied.-
The excess profits tax will be an eight
per cent levy on net incomes of cor-
porations and co-partnerships over
$5,000, and after the eight per cent
normal profits on capital invested hasj
been deducted. For instance, if a firmt
makes $15,000 a year on a capital of
$100,000, $8,000 or eight per cent of
the capitalization will be regarded as
normal profits. A tax of eight per cent
will be imposed on the $7,000 of the
$15,000 profits, an excess tax of $560.
China Has Use
for Americans
Country at Beginning of Growth SaysE
Julian Arnold in Ad-
dress
"There is a constant demand for
American capital, American engineers,
American educators, and American
missionaries in present day China,"
declared Julian H. Arnold, commercial
attache to China and Japan, in his ad-£
dress on "American Opportunities in
the Orient," which was delivered in
the lecture room of the Economics
building yesterday afternoon.
"New China is just at the beginning
of its growth," said the speaker.
"With a population many times that of1
the United States, China has but 6,000
miles of railroad as compared with
our 250,000 miles. China is rich in
minerals of all kinds, but as yet few'
of its vast resources have been de-
veloped. There is an unlimited supply
of material, a steady demand for the'
finished products, and unlimited
labor."
Senior Lits to
Break Training
After Weeks of No-Smoking Siege
They Decide to Indulge
Again
Michigan's senior lits have stopped
smoking.
Fact!
This isn't due to any reform wave,
either, and good old "Billy" Sunday
didn't even mention tobacco. As a
matter of fact they're all in training
for the senior lit smoker which comes
off tomorrow evening and if Ann Ar-
bor doesn't resemble Pittsburg on this
august occasion the senior lits will
disclaim all responsibility.
Mr. L. Wolman of the Economics de-
partment, has been induced to speak.
Harold O'Brien has also been signed

up and since he intends taking oratory
one next semester he's anticipating an
excellent workout. President Muzzy
will be there and will do his best to
enliven the occasion. Harry Carslon
stated last night that he had rounded
up three cohorts and that they were
devoting four hours each and every
evening to practicing the rag time
songs and bits of harmony that they're
going to spring on the multitude.

HUNT WOMAN IN
NOTE LEAGUE PROBE
Order Issuance of Subpoenas for Mor-
gan. and Other Big Financiers;
Lawson Hints at Letter
LANSING BELIEVED TO BE
INNOCENT BY STAR WITNESS
Says He Did Not Have McAdoo or
Tumulty in Mind; Talks of "False
Trail" System
By J. P. YODER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 16.-After order-
ing an issuance of subpoenas for J. P.
Morgan and other big financiers the
house note leak probers late this aft-
ernoon turned most of their attention
to the mysterious missing woman in
the case, Mrs. Ruth Thomason Vis-
conti. The woman had not been found
by house subpoena servers at a late
hour.
Thomas W. Lawson, star witness, in-
jected a new sensation shortly after
the sergeant-at-arms announced fail-
ure of his quest for Mrs. Visconti by
declaring she had told him "Presi-
dential Secretary Tumulty had cursed
her out" when she called Tumulty on
the telephone recently. Lawson had
told of a letter which if published, he
said, "would have dreadful conse-
quences." Lawson suggested he had
"other matters" he wanted to tell the
committee In confidence, but said these
did not involve either the private or
public character of anyone. He was
excused until tomorrow with orders
not to leave town.
Committee Holds Short Session.
Representative Campbell wanted an
executive session wherein to take up
"a very serious matter," and the com-
mittee adjourned for five minutes.
These "other matters," he said, came
from Mrs. Visconti. In the executive
session, Representative Campbell
asked that the committee appoint a
counsel and a stock market expert to
conduct further examination, and he
announced afterwards that a motion
would probably be submitted tomor-
row extending the life of the commit-
tee. The committee automatically dies
tomorrow. This sessiontclosed the
hearing for the day and the majority
members promised a quick answer re-
garding Campbell's request.
Tells of "False News" System.
Lawson had hard work crowding to
the witness stand this afternoon be-
cause it was flanked by women. Rep-
resentative Harrison sought to know
what Lawson meant by a "false news
maker" spreading public opinion in
erroneous channels. "I didn't mean
any persons, I meant a system," Law-
son answered. The system, he said,
(Continued on Page Six)
ENGINEERS SELL 500 TICKETS
FOR SMOKER; HUTCHINS SPEAKS
Five hundred tickets have already
been disposed of to students in all de-
partments of the Engineering college,
who will meet at the Union at 7:30
o'clock tonight for a smoker and gen-
eral good time.
The program includes talks by Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins, and Robert
Rutledge, chief engineer of the Santa
Fe railroad. All members of the en-
gineering faculty are invited to be
present. The remaining tickets will
be put on sale today.

--i

Naval Hero Gives Last Salute
ADMIRAL DEWEY WEAKENED BY CLOSE APPLICATION TO
MAMMOTH FLEET PROJECTS
Washington, Jan. 16.-Four minutes before the clock in the
tower of old St. John's had struck the hour of six last evening, a
snowy-haired old man saluted the grim Commander-in-Chief of all
earthly forces. As calmly as when he gave his famous order to
Gridley that opened the historic battle of Manila Bay, the idol of the
nation, hero of two wars and of a hundred fights by sea, breathed
his last.
Admiral Dewey had devoted his life to the service of his coun-
try. He as with Farragut's squadron when it forced the passage of
Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson in the spring of '62, and in the
battles with gunboats and ironclads that gave Farragut possession
of New Orleans. When his ship, the Mississippi, lost her bearings
in the smoke of the battle at Port Hudson and ran ashore under the
guns of the land batteries, it was Dewey who stayed to see the ves-
sel fired before ordering his men to the boats. When as commander
of the Asiatic squadron he annihilated the Spanish fleet under Ad-
miral Montojo at Manila, on that memorable May day in 1898, de-
stroying or capturing the entire fleet together with all the land bat-
teries, and without the loss of a single man on the American side,
the whole country accorded him the honor he had so richly won.
He was thanked by congress and promoted to rear admiral. One
year later he was made admiral, the second such honor to be
awarded.
Although he was nearing his 80th birthday, Dewey's efforts
never ceased. . As head of the general naval board, his counsel was in-
valuable and it is reported that his untiring labors in behalf of mari-
time preparedness brought on the illness which resulted in his death.
To make the navy of the United States the most efficient in the world
was his ideal, and to the staunch old warrior must go the credit
for much that will be effected in the next ten years.

RETURNS OF HONOR
SYSTEM BALLOTI NG
STILL UNCERTA1[n
SEVENTEEN HUNDRED VOTE
CAST ON CAMPUS YES-
TERDAY

LAW
ON

SCHOOL TO VOTE
QUESTION TODAY

l

REQUIRED 100 MILITARY "CASTLES ON ICE" AT
TRAINING MEN SECUREDI WOMEN'S SKATEFEIST

ARMY OFFICER MUST MAKE IN-
SPECTION BEFORE CREDITS
CAN BE ARRANGED
An unofficial count of those men de-
siring to enroll in the military train-
ing course showed that there were
well over the 100 required by the de-
partment of war. No definite arrange-
ment can be made, however, as to the
number of credit hours to be awarded
until a course of proposed instruction
has been submitted to committees of
the engineering and literary faculties.
This can not be done until an army of-
ficer has been detailed by the govern-
ment to inspect and report upon the
conditions prevailing at the University.
In all probability the minimum will be
two hours of credit.
A meeting will be held in Waterman
gymnasium at 7 o'clock this evening
for the purpose of ascertaining how
many who have signified their inten-
tion of taking the course, have had
previous instruction. All men are re-
quested to bring a pair of tennis shoes.
French Troupe Presents Two Plays
The French troupe of the Theater
Independent Francais d'Amerique pre-
sented the two plays "Le Jour d'Amour
et du Hasaer" and Pailleron's "L'Etin-'
celle" in Sarah Caswell Angell hall
last night. Marivaux's "Le Jour de
Hasard" was especially well given by
the players.
L. Bryson to Lecture to Poetry Club
Members of the Poetry club will hold
a meeting tomorrow evening in the
Cercle Francais room. Mr. Lyman Bry-
son of the rhetoric faculty will deliver
an address,

CARNIVAL PROGRAM INCLUDES
"DANCING" AND HOCKEY GAME;
RACES ARE CANCELLED
The skating carnival given by the
athletic department of the Women's
league at Weinberg's coliseum tonight,
will present as an added attraction,
the "ice dancing" of Mr. and Mrs.
Klausner, widely known as the
"Castles on Ice." When the "dancers"
appear here tonight they will be ac-
companied by another' fancy skater
whose ability is equal to their own.
Their program will include mazurkas,
waltzes, and intricate basket figures.
Arrangements have been made for
a game of ice hockey between the dents
and the junior engineers, as a part of
the carnival, but the races which were
scheduled had to be omitted because of
the length of the program. Olga Shink-
man, '17, is in charge of the carnival,
and tickets may be secured at Moe's
athletic store, at Wahr's and at the
Delta. The admission price is 15 cents.
Patrons are requested to secure their
tickets on the campus as proceeds re-
ceived at the gate do not go to the
athletic department.
GERMAN CROPS GOOD
Berlin Statement Denies Charges That
Nation Is Starving
Berlin, Jan. 16.-A statement issued
by the official press bureau today dis-
cussed and denied in detail the reiter-
ated charges in the allied note, that
Germany was responsible for the war,
and cited statistics to refute charges
that Germany is starving.
"German grain crops," the statement
said, "the present year exceed those
of preceeding years by four million
tons, of which 1,500,000 is bread corn.
This fact already proves that Germany,
for which the last year's crop was
sufficient will get along with this
year's crop even better. The potato
crop, which, while considerable in-
ferior to the average, will be covered
mostly by an excellent beet crop.

Students Are Asked to Express Opin-
ion on Question in Order to As-
certain Campus Sentiment
Seventeen hundred votes ware cast
in the balloting yesterday on the honor
system, but the returns are not as yet
available, as the council has deter-
mined to extend the period of voting
through today.
No vote was taken in the Law school
yesterday, due to shortage of ballots,
and the students in that school will
today be given their opportunity to
voice their opinions on the adoption of
the system. Ballots will not be passed
out in the classes today, but all wish-
ing to vote who have not already done
so will find ballots and a ballot box at
one entrance in each building on the
campus. At the end of the voting to-
day the ballots will be collected, and
complete results will appear in tomor-
row's Daily.
All who failed to vote yesterday are
urged to avail themselves of the op-
portunity to register their stand on
the honor system sometime today, that
a complete census of campus sentiment
may be obtained.
CHICAGO AND MICHIGAN
DEBATE FRIDAY NGH T
NORTHIWFSTERN TO MEET AF-
FIRMATIVE TEAM AT SAME
TIME IN EVANSTON
Michigan's nineteenth annual Cen-
tral league debate with Chicago will
take place at, 8 o'clock next Friday
night in Fuill auditorium at the same
time Michigan's affirmative team is de-
bating Northwestern university at
Evanston, Ill.
The judgesufor the debate in Ann
Arbor are: Judge J. A. Barber of To-
ledo, 0.; Professor 0. C. Lockhart of
Ohio State university, and J. N. Study.
superintendent of the city schools o
Fort Wayne, Ind.
The Michigan varsity band will open
the evening's program by playing
Michigan songs from 7:30 to 8 o'clock.
No admission will be charged to at-
tend the debate, and even the formality
of a ticket has this year been elim-
inated. The auditorium will be thrown
open to all who care to come, students
and townspeople alike.
The question to be debated in the
league this year is: "Resolved, That
congress should levy a progressive In-
heritance tax, constitutionality con-
conceded."
OPERA CHORUS REHEARSAL TO
BE HELD IN PACKARD HALL
According to an announcement made
last night, the rehearsal for chorus
parts in the Michigan Union opera will
be held at 7 o'clock this evening at,
the Packard academy, instead of in
Harris hall. Those trying out for the
leading male part will meet at 4 o'clock
at the Union.
There will be no further cuts made
in the number of chorus tryouts until
immediately after the examinations,
when those found to be ineligible will
be dropped, and the requisite number
picked from among those who show
the best work during this week. Each
man will be graded on his ability.
STATE EQUAL SUFFRAGE BOARD
HOLDS MEETING IN ANN AIBOR
The members of the board and the of-
ficers of the local association were en-
tertained at luncheon yesterday at the
home of Miss P. E. Little. Miss Ethel

president of the association, spoke to
college girls at the Martha Cook build-
ing last evening. The luncheon and
conference at Harris Hall thi~s noon
will be open to all women who are in-
terested in the work of the associa-
tion.

NORMAL CONCERT COURSE
AUDITORIUM

YPSILANTI

Thursday, January 18, 8:00 P. M.
THE KNEISEL QUARTETV
Quartet in D Op. 18, No. 3 ........................... ..Beethoven
Quartet in F Op. 22.................................Tschaikowsky
Andante from Concerto in D ................................Molique
Polonaise Fantastique .... ........... .................... Jeral
Violoncello solos by Willem Willeke
Quintet in E flat, Op. 44.......... .. . . . .........Schumann
Miss Mary Dickinson, at the piano
Single Seats $1.50
Special Interurban Car at 7 P. Nl., returning Immediately after Concert

TONIGHT 7:30 - 10:00 WEINBERG'S COLISEVM
FSkae Srting Carnival
Fancy Skaters fromi Detroit,
Tickets on sale at the Delta, Wakhr's, and Moe',s Atheletic store 150

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