100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR-PROBABLY SNOW
FLURRIES

i

'I, A~1C 1

-AjW
-A, -Ah-

UNITED
DAY AND
WIRE SE:

VOL. XXVII. No. 77. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1917. PRICE Fil

REST OF MILITIA
V.HMEBY MARCH 1
Dismissal of State Soldiers Expected;
Fletcher to Go to Mex.
ico City Post
TO RECALL PERSHING'S FORCES
FROM MEXICAN SIDE OF BORDER
Sending of Troops to the Border Rep.
resents to Date Over $70,-
090,000
By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, Jan. 13.-United States
militiamen will be back in their homes
by March 1 and General Pershing's
column will be on the American side
of the border. Only unforeseen dif-
ficulties or disaster will change this
program.
Moreover this government will es-
tablish a closer medium of communica-
tion with Mexico by sending Ambas-
sador Fletcher to his Mexico City post.
The date for his departure is uncer-
tain, but it probably will be within a
week or ten days. The war department
is ready to move Pershing's column on
a moment's notice.
General Pershing himself has his
men ready for the 150-mile march.
northward within a few hours after
he is given the order. The dispatch
of Pershing into Mexico following the
Columbus raid last spring with sub-
sequent sending of militia to the bor-
der now represents an outlay of about
$70,000,000 or $80,000,000. This figure,
however, includes pay of regulars and
cost of equipment, much of which
would necessarily have been in the
books, expedition or no expedition.
Ancient Fashions
Seen Once Againk
Fancy Dress Party of Women's League
Attended by 400; Old Fash-
ions Revived

ELngland Awaits
Germany 's Hove
Britions See Plight of Teutons Behind
Various Moves for
Peace
London, Jan. 13.-Just what Ger-
many's next move seeking peace will
be, was the topic of most interest in
England tonight.
England accepts approvingly the al-
lied note to America as typifying the
entente's determination not to make
peace except on its own terms, but
public opinion sees behind Germany's
original proffer her desperate eco-
nomic situation, and sees, despite the
allies' failure to fall into the Ger-
man "peace trap," that the Teutons
will persist in attempts.
Interest centers in the meeting at
Berlin next week of the premiers of
all the central powers scheduled for.
Tuesday, and on the conference of
presidents of parliaments of the allied
Germanic powers set for Monday.
In addition there have been fre-
quent reports by way of Amsterdam
that Imperial Chancellor von Beth-
nann-Hollweg will make an "impor-
tant statement" in the reichstag when
it reconvenes during the week. In the
British view one or all of these meet-
ings will have to do with peace.
London, Jan. 13.-Russia has ap-
parently stopped the German machine
in Roumania along the Sereth river
line. The movement of Teutons has
been halted in the river and lake re-
gion forming the northern border of
.Dobrudja.
Paris, Jan. 13.-Calm reigned on the
front from Belgium to southof the
Somme today, tonight's official state-
ment said. In Lorraine and Vosges
there was intermittent shelling.
London, Jan. 13.-Entrance of Ger-
mar forces into Rost, northwest of
Sern.e, but immediate ejection of the
enemy and reoccupation by British
forces was announced by General Sir
Douglass Haig tonight.
Lansing, Jan. 13.-Although public
utility corporations of Michigan were
assessed $19,213,900 more this year
than last, in the tentative assessments
made public by the state tax commis-
sion tonight, they wi'1 pay some $500,-
000 less to the state than they did in
1915.
12 SURVIVE TRYOUTS
Make Cut in Contestants for Mid-West
Debating Team

U.S. CRUISER FAST
ONACIFIC COST
Milwaukee at Mercy of Huge Waves
on Coast of California
Near Samoa
PRACTICALLY ALL OF SHIPS
CREW NOW SAFE ON SHORE
Breeches Buoy Rigged From Fighting
Top; Life Boats Make Peril-
ous Trips
Samoa, Cal., Jan. 13.-Abandoned by
most of her crew, the United States
cruiser Milwaukee, aground in the surf
two miles west of here, was being
pounded and battered by the waves
tonight. That she will be a wreck
was the general opinion expressed by
the naval men who patrolled the
beach and watched the hulk pitch and
plunge.'
The rescue of the crew of 17 officers
and 317 men was almost complete
early tonight and was proceeding sat-
isfactorily. From the tip of the cruis-
er's fighting top to the beach stretched
three lines, and over these a breeches
buoy moved back and forth with mo-
notonous regularity. Two men are
saved on each trip.
Simultaneously two surf boats op-
erated by men of the Humboldt bay
coast guard and members of the
stricken warship's crew, made fre-
quent trips to the vessel each time
bringing five men. Every trip was
fraught with danger too, for the res-
cuers and rescued, as the huge waves
tossed the surf boats about like cork.
The rescue of the crew followed
hours of waiting in the stranded ves-
sel while naval and coast guard men
ashore and the crews of the naval
ships Cheyenne and Iriquois out at
sea worked at top speed to get a line
ashore.
'17 MEDICS HONORED
Alpha Omega Alpha Elects Five to
Membership in Society
Five senior medical students, among
them one woman, were elected to Al-
pha Omega Alpha, honor society, yes-
terday. Alpha Omega Alpha corre-
sponds to Phi Beta Kappa of the Liter-
ary department.
Those chosen are: Henrietta A. Cal-
houn, Loren W. Shaffer, Russel A. Old-
field, Raymond J. Nutting, and Walter]
A. Fort. The formal initiation will
be held next spring'.-
Paul W. Ivey Chaperones Union Dancei
Paul Wesley Ivey, economics in-'
structor, chaperoned the Union dance;
last night. Those serving on the com-
mittee were: C. W. Fischer, '18, chair-l
man; H. A. Gustin, '18, D. C. Mittels-
dorf, '18E, and R. H. Khuen, '19E. ]

DETERMINE ADOPTION OF CAMPUS
HONOR SYSTEM AT TUESDAY VOTE
i. Do you think that a greater spirit of honor will be of benefit
to your school or college?
2. Would you like to see an honor system established in your
school or college?
3. The honor system in the Engineering college and Medical
school has been a success. Do you think that their system would be
a success in your school or college?
4. Will you pledge your loyal support to such an honor system

as has been established in the
school?

Engineering college and Medical

r 1

OR. S. S. WISE TO TALK
AT COMBINED SERVICES
"FACING LIFE" TO BE TOPIC OF
ADDRESS IN HILL AUDI-
TORIUM
Dr. Stephen S. Wise, rabbi of the
Free synagogue of New York City,
will speak at the union church serv-
ices of Ann Arbor at 7:30 o'clock to-
night in Hill auditorium. Doctor Wise
has chosen as the subject of his ad-
dress "Facing Life." He speaks under
the auspices of the Jewish Student
congregation of the University of Mich-
igan.
Dr. Wise was born in Budapest,
Hungary, in 1872. He came to Amer-
ica in his early youth, and entered the
College of the City of-New York, where
he received his A. B. degree in 1892.
He subsequently studied at Columbia
university and took his doctor's de-
gree at that institution in 1901. He
then went to. Portland, Ore., where he
became pastor of the Jewish congre-
gation in that city.
Doctor Wise is known and recog-
nized as an authority on labor every-
where and has served as mediator in
many of the great labor disputes of the
country, notably the recent great cloak
and suit workers' strike in New York
City. Doctor Wise has served in va-
rious labor, religious, and charity ca-
pacities.
He is recognized as one of Amer-
ica's foremost pulpit orators, and his
church services pack the immense
Carnegie hall in New York City, where
they are held every Sunday. While
aggressive in his methods, Doctor Wise
is known as a pacifist, and last year
made a nation-wide lecture tour,
speaking in the interests of universal
peace. This is Dr. Wise's first ap-
pearance in Ann Arbor, although he
has spoken at most of the principal
colleges and universities of the coun-
try.
The ritual services of the occasion
tonight will be read by Rabbi Leo M.
Franklin of Temple Beth El, Detroit,
and music will be furnished by the
choir of Temple Beth El, under the
leadership of Mr. William Howland,
formerly of the University School of
Music.
I1

About 400 University women at-
tended the fancy dress party of the
Women's league last evening in Bar-
bour gymnasium.
The costumes worn answered vari-
ous descriptions, including such for-
eign styles as Dutch and Spanish, old
styles which had been worn by the
girls' grandmothers, quaint and aristo-
cratic types and also gowns represent-
ing the height of fashion.
The board of directors of the league
came as a family group. Those tak-
ing part in this were Mrs. Junius E.
Beal, Dean Myra B. Jordan, Margaret
Reynolds, '17, Albertine Loomis, '17,
Jeannette Armstrong, '17, Anna Lloyd,
18, Olive Hartsig, '17, Clarissa Vyn, '18,
Louise Gould, '18, Ruth Ely, '19, and
Constance Winchell, '18.
The prize for the prettiest costume
was awarded to Hope Ferguson, '19,
who wore a Spanish burlesque cos-
tume, the funniest costume to Florence
Paddock, '17, for the most original to
Golda Ginsburg, '17, and the worst
costume to Caroline.Davis, '19.
"THE DEVIL'S DISCIPLE" GIVEN
BY LELAND POWERS LAST NIGHT
"The Devil's Disciple," George Ber-
nard Shaw's famous drama, with all
ots emotions, its humor and pathos,
its wonderful plot and technique, were
last night brought with a marvelous
art before the audience who heard
Leland Powers.
All J-Hop Committees Meet Today
All the committees for the J-hop are
to meet at 10 o'clock this morning at
the Union to make arrangements for
programs and refreshments, and to dis-
cuss other pertinent matters relative
to this year's party.

'CUT NUMBER OF UNION
OPERA TRYTOUTS TO 5
DIRECTOR MAKES LAST SLASH OF
ASPIRANTS BEFORE EX-
AMINATIONS
The third cut of those aspiring to
places on the chorus of the Union
opera was announced yesterday, low-
ering the number of eligibles to ap-
proximately 65. Director Chales'Mor-
gan stated that in all probability this
would be the last cut this semester, as
he wishes to have a sufficient number
of men on hand to withstand any at-
tack made by the faculty during the
coming examinations.
Already great improvement can be
noted in the way the men handle them-
selves and with a substantial nucleus
of last year's chorus men around which
to build an exceptional chorus is as-
sured. The next chorus rehearsal will
be held Monday night at the Union at
7 o'clock.
Six new men have been added to
those already trying out for the cast,
these men being L. T. Donahue, '19, R.
L. Hardy, '17, H. K. Keena, '19, R. I.
McCaughey, '19, O. G. Williams, '19,
and C. F. Watson, '17. The next cast
rehearsal will b leld at 4 o'clock Mon-
(lay afternoon at the Union.
Chorus Survivers.
The following men survived yester-
day's cut: A. J. Richards, '17, E. H.
Loud, '18, B. R. Penniman, '18, F. J.
Wurster, '17, H. M. Putnam, '19E, M.
H. Friend, '19, A. Zigler, '19, J. H.
Broderick, '19, E. H. Felt. '18, R. H.
Bennett, '18, R. H. Knight, '19, F. 0.
Clifford, '18D C. V. Hicks, '19, C. W.
Bishop, '19, H. M. Cowen, '19, H. J.
Lance, '19, H. MacMillan, '19, J. S.
Wilson, '18, N. Robbins, '17E, M. R.
Pal, '17, J. M. Kerr, '19E, L. S. Sand-
ers, '18, S. A. Lambert, '18, C. H. Ma-
son, '19, C. F. Lambert, '19, M. S.
Tower, '19, D. M. Springer, '19E, T.
P. Melhop, '19, H. S. Hatch, '18, A. A.
Clark, '19, D. U. Bathrick, '18, N. W.
Wassman, '18, G. 0. Russel, spec., J.
P. Hart, '19, F. C. Newell, '19, C. E.
Buell, '19, J. R. Darnall, '18, A. J.
Schmutzer, '17D, K. S. Keyes, '17, S. S.
Shartel, '18, C. F. Boos, '18, T. Say-
lor, '19, R. I. Wheeler, '17, P. S. Lowe,
'iE, H. B. Fenech, '19, P. T. Quarry,.
'19, C. W. Clark, '18, C. J. Sullivan.
'18, C. M. Norton, '19E, R. P. Hummer,
'19, E. G. Allen, spec., E. L. Spanagel,
'19E, J. E. Hayes 19, J. D. Mabley,
'19, C. 0. Skinner, '17E, L. B. Hadley,
',17E,R. Orr, '19E, C. E. Gormson, '18E,
H. R. Cossitt, '19, F. W. Shafer, '18,
B. N. Tappan, '19, F. C. VanBrunt,
'18E, F. C. Bell, '19, and K. S. McColl,
'18.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE TO GIVE
SKATING PARTY WEDNESDAY
The skating carnival to be given by
the athletic committcz of the Women's
league at Weinberg's coliseum has
been set for Wednesday night, Jan. 17.
A hockey game between a couple of
class. teams is one of the attractions
promised, along with races and some
exhibitions of fancy skating.
Tickets are on sale now and will be
,old on the campus Monday. The com-
mittee is making a particular effort
to dispose of a thousand pasteboards
before the night of the event.

VOTE TO DECIE
IMMEIATEI
OF HONOR SYS
PLAN TO BE GIVEN TRIAL
RUARY EXAMINATIO
IF APPROVED
SCHEME SUCCESSFU
IN TWO DEPARTIM
Questionaires to Be Distribute
rious Buildings on Camp
Tuesday Morning
Whether the honor system
adopted for genera use in I
rary examinations, subject
ulty approval, will be decde
student vote Tuesday. Membe
honor committee of the stude
ell announced yesterday thattl
system would be given immed
in these schools and colleges,
dents of which have signifie
most unanimous approval ti
sire for its adoption.
The set of question prepare
council committee incorpor
general principles of the hono:
as it will probably be adopted,
ably passed on by the student
Two Colleges Use Syste
Doubt may arise in the m
some students on reading t
tions concerning the methods
the Medical school and Engine
partment. The system in ti
neering college and Medical
not a set of strictly technica
but rather an attempt to c
principles of honor.
In both cases, practically t1
administration of the system
bands of committees compose
-ients. In the Medical schc
class has its own committee
nembers. The administratioi
Engineering college is left to
mittee of six students, two
two juniors, and two sopi
These committees investigate a
tions and suggest or carry c
penalties as may be advisable
It has been found necessary
engineers and medics for a su
operation of the system that:
1. The student body must
the system fully and whole-h
2. The penalty for violatio
principles must be severe.
Distribute Questions Tue
In engineering and medica
inations instructors are not
rooms except when called in
plain the examination. In othe:
there is no organized policing
tor system. Students place
selves upon their honor to
from cheating either by rece:
giving aid in the examination
Freshmen from each fr
house will report at the Union
Tuesday morning to receive t
tionaires and distribute them
various rooms in he differen
ings about the campus. In ea
a letter will be left, requesi
professors that occupy it thr
the day to distribute the quest
to their classes, and after tb
been answered by the students
lect and return themto a de
room in the building.
F. W. SWAIN TO ADDRESS
A. S. M. E. EETING M
The first of the lectures arra
by "The Present Day Applics

Ball-Bearings" will be deliver
W. Swain of the local branch
o'clock Monday, Jan. 15, in r
of the Engineering building.
ture will be illustrated.
Before t-he close of this s
new officers for the. Univer
ciety will be elected. Member
'unior class are elected to th
at the close of the first semes
date of the election will be an
at the lecture Monday evening.

Twelve men still survive as mem-
bers of the debate squad from which
the personnel of the mid-west de-
baters will be chosen, the first cut of
the squad having been made Satur-
day morning.
The affirmative speakers for the
next elimination are: C. E. Hutton,
'17, J. R. Simpson, '18, R. W. Ward,
'18, H. F. Massnick, '18, and L. W.
Lisle, '17L. The negativenspeakers
are: S. D. Frankel, '17L, R. F. Kahle,
'17, L. B. Harper, '18L, P. A. Miller,
'17L, H. B. Teegarden, '17, N. D. Ire-
land, '18L, and A. P. Bogue, '18L.
ANNOUNCE ORGANIZATION OF
"MAGIC CARPET" ORCHESTRA
Due to an oversight in preparing the
program for "The Magic Carpet" the
personnel for the orchestra was
omitted. It consisted of the follow-
ing: Leader, Abraham Gornetzky, '17;
piano, Frank Taber, '17; violin, Rob-
ert Turner, '19, and Ernest Roscoe,
spec.; cello, Whitley B. Moore, '18E,
and Lee Parker, '17; clarinet, Harry
Koch, '19E; horn, Norbet Lange, grad.;
cornet, Arthur Hammond, '17D, and
John Lundberg, '18D; trombone, Stan-
ley Whitman, '18; flute, Hugo Prucha.
Emily Powell, '19, played the piano
for the special dancing.

Presbyterian Church
10:30 A. M. Service in the Auditorium of High School.
Leonard A. Barrett Speaks-
JESUS AND THE PROBLEM OF SIN
6:30 P. M. Young People's service, McMillan Hall
El
win
m
i First Methodist Church
U'
gmt
A. W. STALKER, D. D., Minister
Im
M 10:30 "A Neglected Kingdom-Law"
IOU'
Cin11-
Einiss

r.

TONIGHT
HILL
AUDITORIUM

UNION SERVICE
Under Auspices of Jewish Student Congregation

DR. STEPHEN S. WISE
Rabbi, Free Synagogue, New York City

TONICH L
HILL
A U DITORiL

7:30 P.M.

SUBJECT: "FACINC LIFE"

7:30 P.M.

s

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan