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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 13, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


I. dl

t

Cordolbans-Cordovans
New Lot Just Received
\7 AIso
Exact\. Skate Shoes

11

GO TO ANN ARBOR'S LEADING
COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHER
for Amateur Finishing, Copying, Enlarging Lantern
Slides etc. A complete and fresh stock of Eastman
Kodaks and Supplies always on hand.
L Y N D 0 ' S 719 N. University Ave.

SPECIAL BARGAINS

In

like cut.

All sizes
as to e.
Fit
guaranteed

4--'---
- - -~\---'~'~' ,/,
'1:
~ '~.
Dark lirown Cordovans

for
Hen and
Women
Black, Tan
Pearl
$3.50 to $5

'Wwriting

Paper

.

I

Hoff stetter's
Walk-Over Boot Shop
We can save - Skates fastened
you money 115 s. MainA Gratis

11

E N I ORS
Sit Early For Your "MICHIGANENSIAN"
PICTURE AT
MAIN STUDIOS
1 546-48 Broadway New York, N.Y
Perfect Portraitures
Unsurpassed Accomodations for
Group Photographs.
b u r :"Amateur Work Handled insa Pro-
4__ _fissional Way.

619 E. LibertySt.

PRIONE 949-W

1

$17.00 UP

FREE
A PAIR of PANTS

$17.00 UP

FREE
with every S U I T or overcoat

Ward's Kiassy Kut Klothes
Dan Massina, Mgr. 118 E. HURON ST.

IAJE STIC
NOW PLAYING

A Satire in One Act

THE

SUFFRAGETTE

REVUE

Special Added Feature
Winona Winter

"The Cheer-Up Girl"
WHAT' GOING ON
Today.
10:30 o'clock-All-engineer assem-
y in U-hall.
1, 2, 3, and 4 o'clock-Rehearsal of
ts one, two, three, and four, respec-
rely of "Pillars of Society," U-hall
iditorium. '
2:30 o'clock - Catholic Students
eet at Packard academy.
7 o'clock-Meeting of the Upper
oom Bible class, 444 South State
reet.
7 o'clock-Meeting of Technic staff
Engineering society rooms.
7:30 o'clock-Fancy dress dancing
irty, Barbour gymnasium.
8 o'clock-Recital by Leland Powers,
-hall auditorium.
Tomorrow.
7:30 o'clock-Dr. Stephen S. Wise
eaks on "Facing Life" at the Union
urch services, Hill auditorium.
6:30 o'clock-Student society meets
Unitarian church.
U-Notices.
The freshman Glee club group plc-
re for the Michiganensian will be'
ken by Daines at 9:45 o'clock this
orning.
latt Adams Declared Professional
New York, Jan. 12.-Platt Adams of
e New York A. C., winner of the
orld's standing high jump champion-
lip at the Olympic games in Stock-
aim, and Edward Emes of the Bronx
hurch house of New York, a prom-
ent competitor in the same event,
3ve been ineligible as amateurs by
.e registration committee of the
etropolitan association of the A. A.
Both athletes were barred through
nnection with sporting goods stores.
"Ike" will play Saturday night at
e Armory. 13

NOYES SEES TEN YEARS OF
FIGHTING AHEAD IN EUROPE
English Poet, Returning to New York,
Tells of British Mlsundpr-
standing of Note
New York, Jan. 12.-Alfred Noyes ar-
rived yesterday on the American liner
St. Paul, which was two days late on
account of the New Year holiday. The
English poet, who will make a short
lecture tour before returning to his
duties at Princeton university, said
that no one could foretell when or how
peace would be achieved, but he spoke
with enthusiasm of the efficiency of
the British preparations on the Somme
front.
"I was there recently," he said,
"and it looked to me as if the war
could go on for ten years without vic-
tory for either side. There is nothing
spectacular about the fighting there.
It is a very grim affair, and looks
just as if a great nation were slowly
pushing its way toward its goal. The
English and French are moving slow-
ly, but certainly, toward the Rhina,
and the Germans are as gradually fall-
ing back. But there is doubt if the
Rhine is ever reached.
"There is scarcely a family in Eng-
land that has not lost a member. There
are five gone in my family. That
makes us serious. I have offered my
services to the war office three times,
but have been rejected on account of
my eyesight. In spite of all this loss
of life, there is no hatred in England
against the enemy-not a bit."
Mr. Noyes said that the British army
on the Somme had plenty of ammuni-
tion and stores of every description to
carry on the war right through the
winter, and that there would be no
slackening day or night.
"There is certainly a preponderance
of allied aircraft," he said, along the
Somme front, and a superiority of
heavy artillery. I saw great flocks of
aircraft of all kinds soaring from our
lines when I was there, less than a
month ago, while there were no Ger-
mans in the air. The British kept up
a heavy bombardment with their guns,
with few replies from the enemy. Ar-
tillery officers informed me that the
reas:n was that the Germans had no
observation balloons, and one must be
economical of shots when they cost
from $500 to $1,000 each, mustn't one?
They don't use thats ort of ammuni-
tion at random."
Arizona Pastor Turns Policeman
Douglas, Ariz., Jan. 12.-The Rev.
Hubert L. Sparks, pastor of the First
Baptist church here, has accepted an
offer of the city council to appoint him
a policeman for the purpose of leading
a campaign against. illicit sale of
liquor, gambling, drug sales, and kin-
dred vices.

PRESS HUTCHINS EXPLINSI
MILITARY COURSE WORK
(Continued from Page One)
take it for at least one school year and
devote three hours weekly to drill and
instruction. President Hutchins stat-
ed that although the character of the
work had not been determined as yet,
it would probably consist mostly of
theory, with some practice. As it is
now understood, the practical work
may either be taken in the University
or at some summer camp. If uniform-
ed companies for drill purposes are
organized in the University it will pro-
bably necessitate the purchase of a
uniform which will not cost more than
$8.00.
)iovement to Provide Oilcers
President Hutchins wishes it made
plain that enrollment in the proposed
courses in no way makes a student
more liable to be called into the feder-
al service in time of war than if he
had not taken the work. The only dif-
ference it willmake is that if men are
drafted into federal service in time of
an emergency, all who have had this
work will be eligible to enter as of-
ficers instead of privates. "The whole
object of the movement among col-
leges," said President Hutchins, "is to
fit young men to be officers in the
army in time of trouble."
Students taking either the classroom
or drill work in the University or in
the summer camps are not required to
take oath as are those in the Naval or-
ganization. They are required to take
the work for one school year if they
elect the courses but may drop them
at the end of that time if desired, or
pursue them further.
Start Campaign M(onaday
Those in charge of introducing this
new work into the University are very
anxious to have a large number of
students enroll in the courses. A cam-
paign will be started Monday by mem-
bers of the present organization for
the purpose of getting more men inter-
ested in the movement. The present
organization will be entirely reorgan-
ized and if enough men join, several
companies will be made. An inform-
ation and recruiting office will be plac-
ed either in University hall or in
Waterman gymnasium, Monday. Any
student who intends to take the pro-
posed course is required to sign a
statement to this effect and hand it in
to Dean Effinger by next Tuesday.
This puts the student under no obilga-
tion but is simply for obtaining the
names of thosemwhointend to take
the work. The blanks to be used for
this purpose may be obtained from
the information office, or from Dean
Effinger's office.
All Students May Take Work
Although credit for this work will
probably be allowed only in the liter-
ary and engineering colleges, students
from any department of the Univer-
sity may enroll in it.
All classes in the engineering col-
lege will be dismissed at 10 o'clock
this forenoon in order that the stu-
dents may hear the proposed course
explained by President Hutchins. The
senior and sophomore classes will
meet promptly after dismissal on the
diagonal walk in the engineering
court, while the junior and freshman
class will meet at the same time on
the east and west walk between the
surveying and medic buildings. The
classes will march from these places
at 10:15 o'clock to the auditorium of
University hall to hear President
Hutchins. Dean Cooley is very anx-
ious to have a good turnout.
Senate Stops Liquor Ads in Mals

Washington, Jan. 12.-Transmission
in the mails of liquor advertisemtnts,
in circulars, newspapers, or otherwise,
into states which prohibit such adver-
tising or solicitation, is barred by a
bill by Senator Bankhead of Alabama,
passed today by the senate. It now
goes to the house.
Announce Union Dance Committee
Union members serving on the regu-
lar Union Saturday night dance com-
mittee this week are: Charles W.
Fischer, Jr., '18, chairman; Herbert
A. Gustin, '18, Douglas C. Mittelsdorff,
'18E, and Richard H. Khuen, '19E.
Ukuleles are the popular string in-
strument of the day and are sold at
the Allmendinger Music Shop, 122 E.

What we
~~ do to Hats
'We mike hiats
We sell hats at retail
We carry a big stock
We have the latest all the time
We shape hats to fit the head
We clean and reblock hats
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard. Next to the Delta
Cor. Packard and State

"The Masquerader"

-i

I

Wed. t sat. G A R R ICKa, n.8
DETROIT

ARCADE'
Shows at 3:00; 6:30; 8:oo; 9:30
ioce Unless Otherwise Speciied.
Phone 2961d.
Fri.-2Charles Richman In "The Rattie
ICry of Peace."
Sat.-z3-Mary Anderson and Wm. Dun-
can in "The LatMa" Charlie
Chaplin in "Behind the Screen"
I(Ret.) sac.
Children's Matinee, 8 P. M.
Mons.-r-Clara Kimball Young in "My
IOfficial Wife."
Tue.-16-Mabel Taliaferro in "The Dawn
of Love." (Ret.) ; Mutt and Jeff
Cartoon.
Orpheum Theatre
Matinees, r:eo-3 :3o: Evening, 6:45,
8:z5, 9:30.
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Sat.-z3-Louise Glaum and Howard Hick.
man in"Somewhere in France." Also
Triangle Comedy. 15c
Sun.-Mon.-14-13-Mae Murry in "The
Plow Girl." Also Holmes Travels.
Tues.-6-Dorothy Gish in "Atta Boys
Last Race." Also Triangle Comedy. i5c

I

aa
/f3- ]

.Of

DAYS GoeNong SUNDAY NIGHT

I

C. W. GRAhAM, Mgr.

TWICE DAILY......1 5 and 8:15 P. M.
EVENINGS....a 75o, $1, n '$1.50
MATINZZ.. a..........25, and75o
Seat Sale Opens Thursday at 1:00 P. M.
LLIAM FOX se
ADE
OF

ALL THIS WEEK

DISQUE STARTS PRISON REFORM
Announces Plan to Reinstate Half Day
of Rest for Convicts
Lansing, Mich., Jan. 12.-Beginning
next week the inmates of Jackson pris-
on will be released from the service
cell - to - work -and-back-again routine
that has been in force ever since the
"intensified production" program was
instituted in order to increase the pro-
duction and financial returns of the
institution.
Warden Disque, the new head of the
prison, paid his respects to the new
governor, Albert E Sleeper, today, and
while here he announced that he would
next week restore the half-hour daily
liberty that prevails in practically
every other prison in the country.
"I feel that the men must, to main-
tain good condition, have some fresh
air, exercise, a bit of relaxation, time
to smoke or chat. We hoped to give
two half hour periods, but because of
other conditions this is impracticable,"
he said.
After the warden's talk with the gov-
ernor it also became known that the
new warden on New Year's day had
assembled all the men, given, them an
army officer's talk, and as an evidence
of his good faith had wiped the slate
clean, had taken the ball and chain
and striped suits off the chain gangs,
which numbered many men despite
the claims put forward for the "new
penology" at Jackson. As a result, the
men showed their appreciation by in-
creasing production in all industrial
departments.
SCENES FROM MANY LANDS
SHOWN IN "MAGIC CARPET"
(Continued from Page One.)
was, stirring, and the spirited college
yell was greeted with much laughter
on the part of the audience
The entire 100 performers in the
cast gathered for a grand finale be-
fore the footlights in response to a
summons from the magician, when the
Cosmopolitan song was sung. The
words and music were written for the
occasion by Prof. J. R. Nelson.

Whitney Th
A A lAa A EO

eater

SUBLIMMJALSOR
AUGMEN7h SYMHN RHS~

Sheehan & Co.

This Wmdfl
The Only Ill=o Dollar Picture PEvermu

i

"

II

WHITNEY

THEATRE

THURSDAY, JAN. 18
SELWYN & COMPANY
Producers of "Within the Law," "Under Cover"
"Twin Beds," "Under Sentence," and Margaret
Illington in "The Lie," etc., etc., etc.
PRESENT
THEIR ANNUAL LAUGH FESTIVAL
Fair AND W arn er

mfr ANU AMtJVK

A PRESCRIPTION FOR THE BLUES
COM POUNDEDB-VO
B y A VE RY HOP W O OD

The Comedy that ran over one year at the Harris (Selwyn & Co.'s own)
Theatre, N. Y., and broke all records for big business.
Now playing at the Cort Theatre, Chicago,

PRICES: 0e - 75c - $1.00 - $1.50

Boxes $2.00

SEAT SALE - TUESDAY, JAN. 16 - 10 A. M.

Carpet," second production of the Cos-
Considerable credit is to be given to
J. P. Adams, '19, and his able assist-
ants for the way in which the proper-
ties were managed, no hitch being ob-
served throughout the entire perform-
ance.
It was to be gathered from the un-
stinted applause of the audience that
numbered over 4,000, that "The Magic

mopolitan club of the University of
Michigan met witb their entire ap-
proval. The proceeds of the ptrform-
ance will be used to establish a loan
fund for foreign students who are
lacking in the means to complete their
collegiate work.
Best music in the city Saturday
night at the Armory. 13

AT T HE

Student

Supply

Store,

You will find everything to suit your needs.
Give us a trial and we will satisfy you.
We develop filrn for 100
Opp. Eng. Arch 1111 So. Univ.

Tel. 1160-R

Dance at Armory Saturday night. 131 Liberty St.

121

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