100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 13, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I HL w M rl
PROBABLY SNOW-HIGH
WINDS

I

Ap 4
r 4lt

3 atty

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 76.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1917.

PRICE FIVE C

I i .--,____

EXPRESS OPINIONS
ON HONOR SYSTEM
Facuity Members Favor Adoption of
Plan to Raise Standards in
Examinations
CAMPUS SENTIMENT BACKS
EXTENSION OF MOVEMENT

Tire Frst Gunu
in Thaw Battle
Prosecution Wins Initial Skirmish
When Partner of Accused Is Held
for Extradition
Philadelphia, Jan. 12.-The first
skirmish of the legal battle that is
to be staged to save Harry K. Thaw
from being returned to Matteawan or
sent to prison was conceded to the

Women Endorse Campaign for
System; Dunne Thinks It
Not Practical

New prosecution here late today when
Oliver A. Brower, indicted on the

That the proposed extension of the
honor system to all the schools and
colleges of the University will mani-
fest itself as an unqualified success,
was the general opinion of members
of the faculty and of several students
prominent upon the campus when in-
terviewed yesterday.
Some little doubt was expressed,
however, as to whether the plan would
work as well in the Literary college
as it has in the professional schools
of engineering and medicine. Prof.
Charles Horton Cooley of the sociology
department said, "I am heartily in
favor of the project, and believe that
with the support and co-operation of
the students its success Is assurred.
But the lack of certain well-defined
and well-knit groups in the literary de-
partment, owing to the wide choice of
electives, may make the establishment
of the system harder to effect."
"There is no reason why the re-
sults of such an honor system should
not prove gratifying," said Dean Myra
B. Jordan, "but of course its success
or failure depends upon its reception
by the student body."
Margaret R. Reynolds, '17, president
of the Women's league, declared that
agitation in that direction had been go-
ing on among the women oftthe Uni-
versity for some time, and that they
would welcome the inauguration of the
plan with favor., Glenn M. Coulter,'
'18L, president of the Michigan Union,
said, "It is advisable that the honor
system be extended to all departments
of the University There is little doubt
about its practicability."
Not so sanguine was the opinion of
Maurice F. Dunne, '17L. "A Utopian
condition," declared the football man,
"much to be desired but not to be
looked for inactual practice."
surprise, then, when in ling up
DR. WISE TO SPEAK
ON "FACING LIFE"

charge of having conspired in the kid-
napping of Frederick Gump, Jr., was
held without bail to await extradition
to New York.
In agreeing that Brower is held for
extradition, Henry Scott, Brower's at-
torney, virtually acknowledged that
Thaw will be returned to New York
to face trial. "In view of the fact
that Thaw is practically in custody,"
he said, "and will himself go or be
taken to New York to answer the in-
dictment under which he is charged,
I am willing that the defendant be
held for extradition."
Assistant Attorney General Black of
New York with Detectives Cuniff and
Flood of the New York force, arrived
here today and were awaiting permis-
sion from physicians to obtain Thaw's
version of the charges made by Fred-
erick Gump, Jr., as well {as the Pitts-
burger's story of his suicide attempt.
It was expected that the murderer of
Stanford White would be strong
enough despite the deep self-inflicted
wounds in his face and wrists to face
this ordeal soon. Thaw will leave de-
spite his wounds, providing he did not
swallow any of the deadly poison tab-
lets discovered to be missing from a
bottle found in his pockets.
Physicians at St. Mary's hospital
declared today they were greatly con-
cerned over the possibility that Thaw
may have taken the poison. With the
discovery that some of the tablets
were missing Thaw is being watched
closely.

REQUIREMENTS OF
COURSEEXPLAINED
Hutchins Tells Literary Students
Nature of Proposed War
Work
MAY ESTABLISH MILITARY
SCIENCE PROFESSOR CHAIR
Engineering Students Gather to Hear
President Talk Today; to
Dismiss Classes
According to present indications the
introduction of Michigan's long talk-
ed of chair in military science is soon
to become a reality. About 50 men of
the College of Literature, Science and
the Arts, expressed their interest and
enthusiasm yesterday afternoon in the
auditorium of University hall, at the
meeting called by President Harry B.
Hutchins for the purpose of explain-
ing the election of the proposed
course in military science and also for
finding out the number of men who in-
tend to enroll in it in case the course
is given. No definite action was taken.
The men were given until next Tues-
day to consider whether or not they
wished to take the work.
100 Men Must Enroll
The specifications of the war depart-
ment state that in order to have an
army officer detailed to take charge of
the work the University authorities
must agree to maintain under the pre-
scribed military training not less than
100 physically fit male students. There
is that number enrolled in the present
organizatio . for military training,
however, it is not known how many of
these intend to elect the course.
President Hutchins will address the
engineering and architectural students
on the subject at 10:30 o'clock this
forenoon, and it is expected that a
large number of them will join the
movement, as it is known that the
sentiment in favor of military training
is much stronger on that part of the
campus than elsewhere.
Outline Possible Courses
The exact character of the proposed
work and the number of hours credit
allowed in the university for it cannot
be determined until the detailed of-
ficer arrives and arranges the courses
with the university authorities to fl
local conditions. The courses prop
posed by the war department which
are subject to modification, are as fol-
lows:
(a). Nomenclature and care of
rifles and equipment.
(b). Infantry drill regulations;
close and extended order, to include
the schools of the soldier, squad, and
company.
(c). Instruction in firing the rifle,
to include gallery practice.
The regulations under which this
work is carried on requires that any
student who enrolls in this work must
(Continued on Page Six)
NOTE PROMISES BOMB
Feminine Writer Threatens to Blow
Up Chicago Bazaar
Chicage, Jan. 12.--A note written in
a feminine hand stating that the
Coliseum where Chicago's biggest
charity event, the allied bazaar, would
be blown up, was received by Thomas
O'Connor, fire marshal, today. The
warning was turned over to Chief of
Police Schuettler, who will assign spe-
cial guards to watch tht building.

Athlete Joins Ambulance Corps
Madison, Wis., Jan. 12.-Stevenson
Lewis of Cleveland, senior agricultur-
ist and track man of the last two years,
will join the Wisconsin ambulance
corps in France. Lewis will be gradu-
ated at the close of the coming se-
mester and will sail Feb. 15 from
New York. Williams, Clark, and
Craigh of the track, football and swim-
ming teams are already abroad.

PERHAPS HERE'S ONE EXPLANATION
OF WHY WE LIVE ON CEREAL FOODS
Chicago, Jan. 12.-With steak at 35 to 40 cents a pound and
bacon at 30 to 35 cents, knights of the high cost of living were cheered
today by the financial statement of Armour and company for the
year ending Oct. 28, 1916. It showed gross ,sales of $525,000,000 as
compared with $425,000,000 the previous year and net profits of $27,-
000,000 against $18,000,000 the year before. J. Ogden Armour, presi-
dent, stated that earnings were at the rate of 20 per cent of the cap-
ital stock.

DESTROY
VESSEL;

ITALIAN
600 PERISH

SCENES OF MANY
LANDS SHOWN IN
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB PRODU
TION PLEASES LARGE
AUDIENCE
GROVER APPLAUDED
AFTER HIS SINGIN
Chinese Act Also Particularly Well I,
ceived; Cast Gathers for Grand
Finale

Mine or Torpedo Is Responsible
Sinking of Reina Margherita
Near Valone

for

GOERNMENT MAY1TAKE
CONTROL 0OF WIRELESS
TiODI), HEAD OF RADIO SERVICE,
SAYS SUCH ACTION NE-
CESSARY
Washington, Jan. 12.- Commander
Todd, United States navy, head of the
naval radio service, told the house-
committee on merchant marine and
fisheries today that the only effective
way of preserving neutrality im wire-
less operations is by government con-
trol of wireless.
The neutral question is a serious
and complicated one, he said, and
ought to be remedied immediately. He
cited submarine activity of the U-53
off Nantucket as illustrating the im-
portance of action. Commissioner of
Patients Ewing told the committee he
believed in government control but
opposes government ownership.
Ewing was of the opinon that the
wireless act could thus be developed
and improved under private owner-
ship. He was in favor of the measure
as it stands, however, and spoke, he
said, for the secretary of the interior.
The bill, while not actually provid-
ing for government ownership, au-
thorizes the purchase of coastal sta-
tions if private companies desire to
sell and so limits private wireless en-
terprise that it eventually will lead to
absolute government ownership.
CAR INJURES COUPLE
Interurban Crashes Into Rig Occupied
by Mr. and Mrs. Sayles
Another accident was added to the
increasing list of catastrophes of the
Detroit, Jackson, and Chicago railway
at 10 o'clock yesterday morning when
a Kalamazoo limited crashed into a
rig occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Floyd
Sayles of Third avenue at the corner
of Seventh and Huron streets, totally
destroying the vehicle, splintering the
glass front of the car, and nearlly
causing the death of the two persons
in the rig. Mr. and Mrs. Sayles were
taken to the University hospital im-
mediately.
Mr. Sayles was driving north on
Seventh street and tried to cross Hur-
on street and evidently not seeing the
approaching interurban, continued
crossing the street. When W. Pratt,
motorman of the car, saw the rig, he
tried to stop, but was unable to do so,
and the interurban smashed into the
rig. Mrs. Sayles, who is more injured
than her husband, sustained a broken
collar bone, a cut on the head, and a
bruised eye.
Dr. E. K. Herdmann, who is attend-
ing the injured parties, stated last
night that the couple are out of danger
Both injured persons are about 40
years old.
Present Reform Bills in Indiana
Indianapolis, Jan. 12.-Prohibition
and suffrage bills were presented to
the legislature today. The dry bill
backed bythe Indianapolis federation
was presented in the senate by Thomas
Dorrell of Greenwood, and in the house
by Frank L. Wright of Randolph
county.

LEADPOWERS BRAS
SKAW'S PLAY TONIGHTi

TO GIVE RECITAL OF "THE'
DISCIPLE" IN U-
HALL

DEVILSI

Leland Powers, in his recital of "The
Devil's Disciple," by George Bernard
Shaw, which he will give tonight at 8
o'clock in the auditorium of Univer-
sity hall, will make his twentieth ap-
pearance before Ann Arbor audiences.
Mr. Powers is recognized as the
best reader today appearing before
American audiences in such programs
as Dicken's "Bleak House," "David
Copperfield," and "The Christmas
Carol," and the works of Booth Tark-
ington, John Galsworthy, and Shake-
speare's comedies, "Twelfth Night,"
and "The Taming of the Shrew."
In 1904 Mr. Powers founded the Le-
land Powers School of the Spoken
Word in Boston, Mass., the foremost
school of public reading, impersona-
tion, and the vocal interpretation of
literature in America.
Mr. Powers has perhaps the most re-
markable list of return engagements
that has been accorded to any reader
or lecturer on the platform today.
Chautauqua, N. Y., has called him 33
different times to appear on their ly-
ceum programs. Brooklyn, N. Y., has
given him 27 engagements and Pitts-
burg has heard him 14 times.
The recital will be held under the
auspices of the Oratorical. association,
and the general admission charge has
been fixed at 35 cents. The charge for
reserved seats is 50 cents.
For the first time in the history of
the University, members of the En-
gineering classes will usher at an Ora-
torical association function. Hitherto,
the Law and Literary colleges.have al-
most exclusively taken the leading
part in the activities of public speak-
ing in the University, but since the
election of their delegates to the Ora-
torical association, the Engineering
college has come closer to the ac-
tivities of oratorical interests in the
University.
R. A. Cole, '18E, is chairman of the
committee, and will appoint the ushers
for tonight's lecture. 5

Dadda Rhamadad il Habodad, magic-
ian and genii at large, rubbed his
magic lamp.
Straightway mystic scenes, spice-
laden from the Orient, passed in sol-
emn splendor before the eyes of the
audience who gathertd in Hill audi-
torium last evening to ride on the
magic carpet to the lands of long ago.
The plaintive melodies of Hawaii,
the holy rites of India, the pomp and
glory of old China in her prime, the
poesy of Japan in the season of the
cherry blossoms, and the piercing war
cries of the dusky Congo chiefs were
blent together in pleasing harmony.
To the beauty and simplicity of "The
Magic Carpet," as written and directed
by Prof. J. R. Nelson, was due its
marked success.
Sent to Penelope Pembroke on the
occasion of her twelfth birthday comes
the Arabian sorcerer to transport her
guests to lands beyond the sea. The
parts of Jennie Jacobs, '18D, as Pene-
lope and of Warren Townsend, '18, as
"Dadda" served as the threads on
which were strung the several scenes
and dances.
Grover Makes Hit With Songs.
Two songs by Frank Grover, 'is,
"The Dinkey Bird," 'and a "Japanese
Love Song," the music of which were
written by Abraham Gornetzky, '17,
won much applause and served each
as an "entre act" as did also two
aesthetic dances, "Aurora and, the
Moonbeams" and the dance of the
Geisha girls.
Perhaps the enthusiasm of the audi-
ence rose to its greatest pitch at the
close of the Chinese act in which was
portrayed the story of Maung Nung,
the Chinese Joan of Arc, which part
was played by Charlotte Kelsey, '18.
The role of her blind father, the Rev-
erened Kwong Lee, was taken by R.
Clarence Hunter, '17. The lighting ef-
fects, the costumes of the actors, and
the naturalness of the acting well
merited the applause which was ac-
corded the playlet.
The poetic atmosphere of the Hindu
scene, which won praise from Tagore,
while it was yet in the manuscript,
proved no less attractive. The wierd
chanting of N. R. Chavare as Narida,
the holy man, seemtd to strike the key-
note of India's-an ient mysticism. How
Krishnarao, full of occidental ideas,
is brought back to the faith of his fa-
thers, forms the theme of the act. Dr.
N. S. Hardikar took this part, while
that of his wife, the simple Kamala,
was played by Florene Pride.
Japanese Scene Pathetic.
A touch of the pathetic was fur-
nished by the scene trom Japan. From
shrine to shrine the noble Baron Inada
seeks his long lost daughter, finding
her at last in the keeping of Maru
the peasant. She refuses to leave her
foster parents. Elsa Apfel, '17, won
applausp as the daughter, as did E
Katsuizukmi, '17, as the nobleman. M.
Uyehara as the pilgrim caught the
spirit of the spring in the warbling of
his flute.
To A. F. Seele, '18D, and A. R.
Melcher, '18D, goes the credit for the
realistic Congo scene. Both men have
lived among the Zulu tribes, and as
leaders of the two bands of warriors
managed to present a spectacle that
(Continued on Page Six)

Talks at Union Service in Hill
ditorium Tomorrow
Night

Au-

"Facing Life," is the subject Dr.
Stephen S. Wise, rabbi of the Free
Tabernacle in New York City, has
chosen as the subject of his address
to be delivered at the Union church
service to be held tomorrow night in
Hill auditorium.
Dr. Wise has spoken in practically
all the principal cities of the United
States, and at many colleges and uni-
versities, but this is his first visit to
Ann Arbor. Within the next month
he will speak at the chapel services
of Cornell University for the second
time during the present school year.
Dr. Wise is known the country over
not only as a pulpit orator, but as
a speaker on any occasion. He last
year made a nation wide tour speak-
ing in behalf of universal peace.
75 Couples Attend Architects' Dance1
More than 75 couples attended the
architects dance at the Michigan Union
last night. Prof. Emil Lorch and Mrs.
Lorch, Prof. George M. McConkey and
Mrs. Conkey and Prof. Louis Boynton
and Mrs. Boynton chaperoned the
party.
Those serving on the committee
wtre: Charles M. Norton, '19A, chair-
man; Lawrence S. 'Martz, '18A, and
Harold M. Kiefer, '19A.

Berlin, Jan. 12.-Six hundred sailors
abroad the Italian ship Reina Marg-
herita perished when the ship was de-
stroyed off Valone by mine or torpedo,
the press bureau announced today, re-
ferring to confirmation from the Bas-
eler Anzeiger. The press bureau's
statement follows: "The Baseler
Anzeiger reports from Rome the de-
struction of the Italian battleship
Reina Margherita is confirmed. The
vessel sunk off Valone either as the
result of a mine or torpedo. Six hun-
dred out of 800 men on board perished.
RAILWAY BROTHERHOODS WILL
WAIT FOR COURT DECISION
Chicago, Jan. 12.-The conference of
representatives of the four railway
brotherhoods in session here probably
will close tonight, W. G. Lee, presi-,
dent of the trainmen, stated today.
"We have reviewed the situation thor-
oughly and there is nothing more left
for us until the supreme court hands
down its decision," Lee told the United
Press.
CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
TO BE SENT TO WAR THEATER
Montreal, Jan. 12.-The royal Can-
adian northwest mounted police are to
be sent oversea as a part of the Can-
adian fighting forces. Plans are under
way to send this world famous organ-
ization to the European war theater.
The provisional governments in the
west have been notified to arrange for
policing their own territories during
the absence of the present forces.

BLAST SHAKES N.

Y.

Blasts at Haskell, N. Y.. shatter Win-
dows in Metrop .s
New York, Jan. 12.-Three explos-
ions in Haskell, N. J., about 30 miles
west of this city; at 10 o'clock last
night, rocked the city for several sec-
onds. The force of the detonations
shattered a number of windows and
tore down many wires. The extent of
the casualties and damages have not
yet been dttermined.
House to Stand Pat on Defense Act
Washington, Jan. 12.-The house
committee on military affairs will
stand pat on the national defense act
of last June regardless of any action
of the senate, Chairman Dent an-
nounced today, following a decision of
the committee to hold no further hear-
ings to admit further criticism of the
national guard.

A Powerful Play
A Meester's
Interpretation

HAVE YOU H-AR
L E L N D POiWE Rs

6A L L
Seets at Wahr's
35 to S0 ento

O* DatVIL S I tos^ C .- A P *.E?'".
yr ~h' "~aCe

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan