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January 12, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-12

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UNITED PRES:
DAY AND NIGHT
WVIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 75. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 1917. PRICE FIVE CE

CAMPUS TO DECIDE
ON HONOR SYSTEM
BY GENERAL VOTE

RESOLUTION FOR CAUCUS
PASSED BY STUDENT
COUNCIL

IS

WILL BALLOT
CLASSES ON

DURING
TUESDAY

Junior Lits and Engineers to Elect
Members to Governing
Body
A census of the attitude of the stu-
dent body of the University towards
the adoption of an honor system in
time for the coming examinations will
be taken next Tuesday.
The decision of the Student council
to submit questionaires to all classes
came as the reult of the report of a
committee which has been investigat-
ing the honor system. The committee
reported that'it had met Tuesday night
with members of the faculty and
representatives of some of the student
organizations, and that this combined
body had arrived at the following con-
'clusions:
1. That a greater spirit of honor
should be fostered among the stu-
dents of the University.
2. That the boast of having "put
it over on the Prof." must be entire-
ly eliminated.
3. That this is the proper time to
consider the establishment of the hon-
system in the various schools and
colleges of the University.
4. That the forced cheating of
those who do so in self defence to
keep abreast of their less conscienti-
ous neighbors would be reinoved by a
spirit of honor.
5. That if a spirit of greater honor
is adopted by the student body it will,
no doubt, meet with the hearty sup-
prt of the faculty of most of the
schools and colleges.
6. That a system corresponding to
those already in successful operation
in the Engineering college and Medi-
cal school should be adopted in case
the project is favorably received by
the student body.
Medical School Uses Plan
The plan now in use in the College
of Engineering and the Medical school
is based- upon a declaration of prin-
cipals which states that it is not hon-
orable either to give or recieve help
In examinations. It has proved suc-
cessful here, due to the fact that all
the students lend their hearty co-oper-
ation to the system and principles in-
volved. Practically entire charge of
the administration of the system is in
the hands of an honor committe com-
posed of students. They attend to the
details of dectection, investigation,
and disposition of the cases.
After the report of the committee
had been given, the Council voted to
submit the pla to the campus for its
sentiment. The method to be em-
ployed in doing so will be similar to
that used last year in the health
questionaire gotten out by the Health
service. Ballots will be passed out in
the various classes next Tuesday in
all the colleges except Medicine and
Engineering. In this way it is hoped
that every member of the colleges
where the system is not at present in
use will have an opportunity toiex-
press his opinion on the question.
Whether or not any reform will be
adopted depends largely on the out-
come of the vote.
To Purchase New Rope
A new rope to be used in next
spring's tug-of-war between the un-
derclassmen has been ordered by the
Student council to replace the one de--
stroyed last year. The rope was sev-
ered during a struggle for- its pos-
session after the tug itself was over
The cost of the new rope is to be as-
(Continued on Page Six.)

SYSTEM SUCCESSFUL
AMONG ENGINEERS
Honor Examinations Find Favor in
Professional College Says
R. L. McNamee, 117E
According to Robert L. McNamee,
'17E, former member of the honor com-
mittee for the College of Engineering,
the plan of putting students upon their
honor in examinations, has resulted in
an unqualified success, and the belief
seems well founded that the same
would result from its adoption in the
other schools and colleges of the Uni-
versity.
The committee was first composed of
two men from each class, with an act-
ing chairman selected from the senior
class. Their first task was to organize
and put into effect the honor system in
the College of Engineering. Since its
inauguration, the committee has acted
as a disciplinary body. While working
without set rules or even a constitu-
tion, this committee handles all cases
of misdemeanor reported to them. It
is the duty of each member of any
class to make such report, should no
attention be paid to the admonition of
the class by the student offending.
For those students who do not de-
sire to take an examination under the
honor system, a "proctor room" has
been instituted where the quiz is given
under the supervision of some in-
structor. This room has been rarely
used, it is said. The professor con-
ducting an examination leaves to a
vote of the class whether or not he
shall remain in the room.
THAW CUTS TROT ON
ARRITAL OF DETECTVES
RUSHED TO HOSPITAL WHERE
DOCTORS SAY CONDITION
IS SERIOUS
BULLETIN.
Philadelphia, Jan. 11.-Harry Thaw's
condition is still critical.
Philadelphia, Jan. 11.-Harry Kend-
all Thaw, slayer of Stanford White,
seriously slashed his throat and wrist
here this afternoon as detctives were
about to arrest him in answer to an*
Indictment in New York, charging that
he kidnapped 16-year-old Frederick
Gump, of Kansas City.
Bleeding profusely from deep
wounds, he was found in the home of
Mrs. Elizabeth Taco, 5260 Walnut
street here, where he had been for
several days. Thaw was taken to St.
Mary's hospital in a private ambul-
ance, where doctors said his condition
was serious.
Detectives had completely surround-
ed the house after tracing Thaw there.
The fugitive had evidently been watch-
ing the net close about him. Lieu-
tenant of Detectives Wood followed by
four plainclothesmen, pounded on the
door. After repeated knockings they
forced their way in. Thaw was sit-
ting in a chair gazing calmly at the
blood as it spurted from the cuts.
Thaw asked to be taken to St.
Mary's hospital. Severaltother hospit-
als were passed on the road, but
Thaw's wish was followed. He had
evidently taken great care in cutting
himself for the main arteries had been
slashed at the wrist. The cut in his

throat was not sufficiently deep to
prevent it being treated in the am-
bulance.
Efforts to arouse Thaw sufficiently
to make a statement to the police
proved futile. A police guard was put
at his bed. If he recovers, he will be
arrested and held here for the New
York authorities.,
On the bed was a bottle of bichloride
of mercury tablets. Some of the pois-,
on had been removed. It is not known
whether he took any.

"NGEMPI JAMA, ZUMU" ,
ZULU COLLEGE YELL

COSMOPOLITAN CLUB PLAYI
READY AFTER LONG
PREPARATION

FORINSTUDENTS
PRESENT "MAGIC gP "TOIH

Production Portrays Adventures
American Girl on En-
chanted Rug

of

19

"The Magic Carpet" takes place at
8 o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium.
Aladdin and his lamp!
Quick transitions from an American
garden to brief vivid phases of life
In countries practically aststrange to
the modern American as that of the
Arabian Nights serve to furnish a novel
evening's entertainment.
Going from the birthday party of a
rich little American girl on "The
Magic Carpet" to Hawaii, the land of
volcanoes and plaintive music, the
scene gives an opportunity for ukelele
accompaniment to songs of foreign
origin.
"E Zulu ngempi jama zumu--"
Thus begins one of the Zulu war
chants given by the actors who fur-
nish -the South African scene, at the
command of Aladdin. The 20 men
who take part in this portion of the
program have been carefully studying
the songs in order to give them their
ful value of impressiveness.
Aladdin Disguised.
Aladdin, in this production, is dis-
guised as "Dadda Rhamadad il Habo-
dad." He is served by six minature
genii, four of whom have the custody
of "The Magic Carpet," while the
others act as attendants of the sacred
lamp.
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, producer,
has composed a song of cosmopolitan-
ism fr thetoccasion. The music is
impressive, the words inspiring. Pro-
fessor Nelson conceived the idea for
this series of clear pictures early in
the summer and the completed pro-
duction gives testimony of the consid-
eration the play has received.
President Harry B. Hutchins ap-
proved forcefully the aim of the en-
tertainment, which is two fold: to dem-
onstrate the interesting qualities of
some national life, and to found a loan
fund for foreign students. Professor
J. A. C. Hildner and other faculty
members have also given the produc-
tion their unqualified approval.
Tagore's Approval.
Sir Rabindranath Tagore in his ap-
preciation of the Hindu act concen-
trated the interest of many upon this
unique portion of the evening's pro-
gram. Particular attention has been
accorded the lighting and scenic ar-
rangements needed to bring out clear-
ly the effects of the costuming in the
Japanese and Chinese representations.
After following in the path of "The
Magic Carpet" through various pro-
trayals of national life, Aladdin, at the
request of the American girl and her
friends, calls back the 100 actors to
form the finale. The lights go down
on the assembled cast singing the song
composed for the occasion by the pro-
ducer.
CLAIM 14-YEAR-OLD KANSAS
GIRL KILLED HER MOTHER
Paola, Kans., Jan. d1.-Hazel Speel-
man, 14, found wounded, beside the
dead body of her mother, in an old
barn near here last week, was ar-
rested this afternoon charged with
murder. The girl is believed by coun-
ty officials to have shot her mother
and then to have attempted suicide.
Although the girl is believed to be dy-
ing, she will be taken to a Kansas
City hospital and operated on in a
hope of saving her life.

DEANS STRONGLY IN
FAVOR OF SYSTEM
headsof Colleges Go on Record U'nan-
imously as Supporting
Donor Idea
Expressions of opinion of the deans
of the various schools and colleges of
the University show that they are
unanimously in favor-of the honor sys-
tem, providing that the students de-
sire its adoption.
Dean J. R. Effinger of the Literary
college said, "I am heartily in favor
of the honor system and shall do all
in my power to aid its adoption in the
University."
Dean H. M. Bates of the Law school
expressed himself in favor of the honor
system as follows: "I am in favor of
the principles of the honor system
and have at two different times sug-
gested its adoption."
Dean A. H. Lloyd of the Graduate
school said, "I am in favor of the honor
system of conducting examinations and
would support any movement to insti-
tute it into the University."
Dean V. C. Vaughan of the Medical
school expressed himself as being very
strongly in favor of the honor system
of conducting examinations, saying
that the Medical school had used it for
16 years. "I would never go back to
the old method of conducting examina-
tions. The honor system is the proper
thing and on the whole works well.
Besides this, it is the duty of teachers
to hold up high ideals to our students
as well as to instruct them in the
studies of the curriculum."
"Great," said Dean M. E. Cooley of
the Engineering college when asked
his opinion of the honor system, "and
the best part of it has been the added
dignity that has come through its adop-
tion. But the only honor system which
will be a success is one run by the
students themselves with the faculty
keeping out of it"
Prof. C. B. Kinyon of the Home-
opatic Medical school said, "I have
used the honor system for two years
in my classes and would not return
to the former method of conducting
examinations."
SCENE OF GERMAN TRIUMPHS
DESCRIBED BY PROF. MARTONNE
- Roumania, the scene of the latest
triumphs of the central powers, was
the subject of an illustrated lecture by
Prof. Emmanuel de Martonne of the
Sorbonne, Paris, in the auditorium of
the new Science building yesterday
afternoon.
The lecture was the second and last
given by Professor Martonne, his sub-
ject Wednesday having been "The Bat-
tlefields of France." The speaker con-
trasted the fertile fields of the times
of peace with the corpse strewn fields
of war.
SAYS CAPITAL MUST
BE LABOR'S FRIEND
Magnate Pleads for Better Under-
standing Between Two
- Powers
Ithaca, N. Y., Jan. 11.-"The time
is coming when the important quali-
fications for f;olding executive posi-
tions, will be a man's ability to deal
successfully, and amiably with labor,"
John D. Rockefeller, Jr., declared to-
day, speaking at Cornell founders' day
ceremonies.

He declared that was the reason la-
bor and capital have had so many dif-
ferences, adding that proper co-opera-
tion cannot follow such attitudes, and
pleaded for a better understanding be-
tween the two industrial powers.
beckefeller referred to his experiences
in the Colorado coal fields, declaring
miners showed a tendency for frank-
ness in all discussions regarding rela-
tions between capital and labor.

URGE BANISHMENT OF TURKS FROM
AND ARMENIAN RELEASE FROM

EUROPE
SUBJECT

Berlin Powers Issue Note Addressed to Neutral Powers in Which the
Ally Communication Wins Reference as "Too Insolent to ,
Answer"; Teutons Still Ready for Conference
Washington, Jan. 11.-The allied reply to the Wilson note has been
received in Washington. It says the details of the allies' terms are no
to be made public until a later hour in the negotiations. The minimum is
Restoration and indemnification of Belgium, Servia, 'Montenegro.
Evacuation and reparation of the occupied parts of France, Russia
and Roumania.
The freeing of the Armenians from Turkish domination, and the elim
ination of the Turks from the continent of Europe.
Berlin, Jan. 11.-Germany sent a note to all neutral nations stating
that the language of the entente reply was too insolent to answer. She
renewed her expression of willingness to state the terms of a peace at a
conference.
London, Jan. 11.-In a speech today David Lloyd-George declared the
allies were determined to rid the world of "unspeakable despotism." He
added that Wilson had been informed that all desired peace.

ALLY -REPLY TO' PEACE NOTE WA'NTS
REPARATION AND RESTORATION FROFI
GERMANY [EENEGOTIATI1ONS BEG
EXACT DETAILS OF REPLY TO PRESIDENT WILSON KEPT SECRI
UNTIL A TIME NEARER TO REALIZATION
OF MEETING IN FUTURE

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
IT CAN'T BE DIDi *
* . _*
* Minneapolis, Jan. 11.-"Blessed
* is she that bottleth up her mouth *
* -for she shall be called a *
* corker" is the motto of a novel *
* organization formed by the wom- *
* en of the University of Minne- *
* sota which is known as the anti- *
* gossip club. The object of this *
* club is to offset the influence of *
* the Gossip club which meets *
* once a week on the campus for *
* a "gab-fest."*
EXPLAINS MILITARY .
TRAINING TO LITS
President Hutchins to Address Meet-
ing in University Hall
Today
President Harry B. Hutchins will ad-
dress a meeting of men students in the
College of Literature, Science and the
Arts in University hall at 4:15 o'clock.
this afternoon to explain to those in-
terested in work in the subject of
military training, the requirements
necessary to elect work of this char-
acter. The president- will speak with
4 view to establishing at the Univer-
sity courses in military work under a
United States army officer to be de-
tailed here if 100 men signify their
willingness to elect the course.
The president will explain, under
the authority of the committee on
military training, appointed by the
regents of the University, the require-
ments of General Orders No. 48, as is-
sued by the war department, which
will be expected of students who elect
military work.
President Hutchins will deliver the
same address to students of the Col-
leges of Engineering and Architecture
at a meeting to be held tomorrow at
10:30 o'clock in University hall, with
the same end in view.
Discuss "Magic Carpet" Ticket Sale
A meeting of the Cosmopolitan club
was held in room 302 University hall
last night todiscuss the sale of tickets
for "The Magic Carpet." Prof. J. A.
C. Hildner and Harry Johnson, '17L,
gave short talks in which they urged
the men to press the ticket sale on
Friday.

By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 11.-Couched
what officials hint is "clear a
strong language," the entente reply
President Wilson's note to belligere
reached here today, with an unmist
able definition of exactly what the
lies are fighting for.
In so far as officials would reve
the message also places the burden
responsibility upon Germany in
matter of giving further peace ter:
for as it left a way for Germany to
this, it might be said the note left
door open for continuing peace nego
ations.
One official indicated that the re
was not a "complete throw-down
President Wilson's note." 'I
strengthens the view that the pe
door is still ajar, though official d
cussion and information was so li
ited that a complete interpretation
government feelings toward the mi
sage could not be obtained.
Germany's Latest Note.
Berlin, Jan. 11.-The German g
ernment today sent a new note to n
tral nations. It stated first that
German government had, received
entente reply to the note of Dec.
and the press bureau said that-
note "contained a proposition to en
at once into peace negotiations. '
note, the press bureau states, c
tinues: "Our adversaries declined 1
proposition, giving as a reason tha
is one without sincerity and with
importance. The form in which t
clothed their communication exclu
answer to them, but the imperial g
ernment considers it important
point out to the governments of ni
tral powers, its opinion about the s
ation.
Not Discussion of War Origin.
The central powers have
reason to enter into any discussi
about the origin of the world,"
note continued, according to the pi
bureau text. "History will judge u
whom the immediate guilt;.of the'v
falls. The verdict will as little i
over the encircling policy of EnglE
the revengeful policy of France,
the endeavor of Russia to gain C
stantinople, as over the instigation
a Serbian. assassination in- Saraje
and the complete mobilization of R
sia, which meant war against (
many."
(Continued on Page Six)

IT'S

TONIGHT

THE MAGIC CARPET
TICKETS ON SALE AT HILL AUDITORIVM WAHR'S AND ON CAMPUS
50 cents 8:00 P. M. HILL AVDITORIUM

4S

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