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January 11, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-11

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W FLURRIES AND
COLDER

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UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

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VOL. XXVII. No. 74.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 11, 1917.

r t r

"BUFFALO BILL"
DIES IN DENVER
Col. W. S. Cody, Famous Frontiers-
main, Meets End at Sis-
ter's Home
KILLED HIS FIRST INDIAN
AT AGE OF TWELVE YEARS
Was Scout, and Enlisted' Man in Civil
War; Won His Nickname by
Killing 4,280 Buffloes
Denver, Jan. 10.-Colonel William S.
Cody, Buffalo Bill, is dead.
The noted plainsman and scout
breathed his last at 12:05 o'clock this
' afternoon and with his passing, it
seemed to the thousands of friends
who had closely followed his fight for
life, as if the last vestage of the old
west, the "wild and wooly west," had
passed with him.
Hero of hundreds of cheaply bound
paper books designed to catch the
youthful eye, and foremost figure in
book after book of morocco bound
treasured adventure tales, he was the
idol of boys both old and young the
country over.
Fought in Civil War.
He killed his first Indian when he
was only 12 years old, while he was
with a troop of United States soldiers
on their way from Lawrence, Kans., to
Utah. Colonel Cody was only ten years
old when he left Iowa and went with
his father, mother, and seven sisters
and brothers to Kansas.
Cody served in the Civil war first
as a horse buyer for the government,
then as a guide to Colonel Clarke, com-
manding the Ninth Kansas volunteers,
and then as an enlisted man. He gained
his nickname in 1867 when he killed
4,820 buffaloes while under a contract
to supply a Kansas-Pacific railroad
gang with buffalo meat.
He died at the home of his sister,
Mrs. May Cody Decker, of this city,
where for weeks he lay critically ill
making the hardest possible battle for
his life. Weeks ago friends despaired
of his recovery from a complication of
diseases, but Buffalo Bill refused to
give up. He rallied to the extent that
he could be moved to Glenwood
Springs for his health, but a relapse
occurred and he was brought to Den-
ver.
Uremic poisoning, which set in yes-
terday, was the immediate cause of
Colonel Cody's death, Dr. East stated.
All of Colonel Cody's relatives and
several friends and old time associates
were at the bedside when he died. Col-
onel Cody will be buried in Denver.
Knew of Approach of Death.
Two days before his death Buffalo.
Bill himself knew that' the end was
only a matter of hours, but the grim'
old pioneer, schooled to fortitude,,
never wavered. Cheerfully he dis-
cussed his coming death with relatives
He even made plans for his funeral.
He met death as he met life, squarely
and without flinching. He was con-
scious during his long illness until a.
few hours before the end.
WILSON'S RAILWAY
HEARINGS CLOSE
Interstate Commerce Commission Will
Hear Last of Reports of legis-
lation Tomorrow
Washington, Jan. 10.-Senator New-
land, chairman of the inters tate com-
merce committee, announced today he

would endeavor to close the hearings
on the president's railway Legislation
program tomorrow. The <,ommittee'
will meet Friday in executive 3 session,
Newlands said, and report out the
president's railroad bills.
Mr. Lewis Gives Talk on Power Plants
Mr. Lewis of the Detroit Ed.:ison Co.
gave a short talk on the "Water Power
Plants on the Huron" before tbte local
branch of the A. I. E. E. last night.

8 HOUR LAW NOW
IN SUPREME COURT
Adamson Measure's Constitutionality
to Be Decided before High-
est Tribunal
Washington, Jan. 10.-The Adamson
railroad law is in the hands of the
United States supreme court.
The court is to decide whether this
statute, based on sensational circum-
stances last fall to avert paralysis of
the nation's commerce highways, is
constitutional. Frank C. Hagerman,
special assistant attorney general,
closed his arguments to the high trib-
unal at 1:45 this afternoon and the
government formally took the matter
under consideration.
When a decision can be expected is
mere speculation, both government and
railroad attorneys agreed this after-
noon. Hagerman went over a rather
rough path,- as Chief Justice White,
Justice McKenna and Justice Pitney
tried him with questions.
Hagerman, despite hammering, con-
tended that anything that had to do
with "turning of a wheel" has to do
with commerce, and that if commerce
is interstate, congress may regulate it.
Hagerman admitted the Adamson law
"goes a little further than any previ-
ous law" but contended it is clearly
constitutional.
HUTCHINS TO TELL
OF TRAINING PLANS

JENNIE JACOBS,'
° MAGIC

'18D, WHO WILL PLAY THE LEADING ROLE IN "THE
CARPET," AND PROF J. RALEIGH NELSON,
AUTHOR AND DIRECTOR

I

TAGORE PRAISES HINDU
SCENE IN "MAGIC CARPET"

AIES PROMISE ITALY
LAND AS BRIBE-REPORT

Philosopher
Idea

Says Plot Gives
of Indian Stage
and Life

Good

Entente Assures Territoryi
for Eastern Front,
Official Sources

to Get Men
Say

"No American could have written
this play. The plot is excellent, and
will give the people of Ann Arbor a
better idea of the Indian stage," said

Students of Literary College
Want Military Course Meet
Tomorrow

Who Sir Rabindranath Tagore on the oc-

President Harry B. Hutchins will
meet students in the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts to ascer-
tain the number who wish to elect a
course in military training, tomorrow
afternoon at 4:15 o'clock in Univer-
sity hall. The president will meet stu-
dents of the Colleges of Engineering
and Architecture for the same purpose
Saturday at 10:30 o'clock in the same
place.
The president is calling these meet-
ings under the authority .of the com-
mittee on military instruction, ap-
pointed by the regents of the Univer-
sity. The committee voted that, "if
the faculties of the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, and the
Colleges of Engineering and Architec-
ture decide to give ithe time for mili-
tary studies specified in General Or-
ders No. 48, as amended, the president
be directed to call meetings of the
students enrolled in these colleges who
are interested in the subject of mili-
tary training, in order to ascertain the
number who desire to elect work of
this character."
At these meetings President Hutch-
ins will explain fully the requirements
of General Orders No. 48, as issued by
the war department, and what will be
expected of students who elect mili-
tary work. Under the orders the Uni-
versity authorities must among other
things, "agree to maintain under the
prescribed military training not less
than 100 physically fit male students."
MAKE CUTS IN BOTH CAST AND
CHORUS TRYOUTS FOR OPERA
Several cuts were made when the
cast for the Union opera went through
the first act yesterday afternoon. The
present list of the cast is posted at
the Union as well as the first of those
who survived last night's cut of the:
chorus. The next cast tryout rehearsal
will be held Friday at 4 o'clock at the
Union. There will be another rehearsal
of the chorus tryouts at 7 o'clock to-
night at the Union.
Prof. A. C. Glaser to Lecture in Detroit
"The Vitalistic and Mechanicalistic
Conception of Man" is the subject of a
lecture. to given by Prof. A. C.
Glaser befo e the Twentieth Century
club of Detroit tonight through the
office of the University extension de-
partment.

casion of his recent lecture here, after
reading the scenario of the Hindu
sketch of the "Magic Carpet."
Other scenes of the play are fully
as representative of the native cus-
toms of the people as the Hindu act.
Sotokichi Katsuizumi, '17, said yester-
day of the Japanese scene, "It is very
representative of my country."
The stirring reality of the Zulu scene
is due to the work of Albert A. Seele,
'18D, and Robert Melcher, '18D, both
of whom have lived among the Zulus
and speak their language. Many be-
lieve this scene discloses the origin of
college yells.
Much effect has been added to the
play by correct stage properties. As
an example of the care taken in the
designing of these, the Japanese fence
was built low and with openings at
both top and bottom. This was due
to the fact that there was a law in
feudal times which made the builder of
a fence capable of furnishing a hiding
place for a robber liable for all in-
juries received from the highwayman
using the fence as a refuge.
Great care has been taken in the se-
curing of correct costumes. For the
Hindu scene it was necessary to go to
New York for the women's costumes.
A great variety of music is included
in the play. In addition to songs writ-
ten by Abraham Gornetzky, '17, and
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, there are thril-
ling Zulu war chants, selections by
the Hawaiian quartets, and old Hindu
hymns sung by the young Indian actor,
Nilkanth Chavare of Kolhapur, India.
Several beautiful dances have been
improvised by Miss Evans director of
Barbour gymnasium.
DRY LAW FOR MISS.
Gov. Bilbo to Convene Legislators to
Pass Liquor Restrictions
Jackson, Miss., Jan. 10.-Governor
Bilbo announced this afternoon that
he would call an extra session of the
Mississippi legislature in a day or two
to pass an absolute prohibition law.
The United States supreme court de-
cision sustaining the Webb-Kenyon
law prompted the governor's action.
Catholic Students to Dance Saturday
The Catholic Students' club will hold
their first dance this year at 2:30 to
5:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon at
Packard academy. Chaperones and
committee on arrangements will be
picked later.

Washington, Jan. 10.-One of the
chief reasons for the allied conference
at Rome was to discuss Italy's claim
to territory on the eastern shore of
the Adriatic sea. The official report
today related rumors that Italy has
been guaranteed Trieste, Austria, and
the surrounding territory at the north-
ern end of the east shore of the Adri-
atic, largely inhabited by Italians, and
South Albania at the south end of the
eastern shore of the Adriatic.
It was also reported Italy has am-
bitions for territorial acquisitions in
Dalmatia between the two sections'
above mentioned. Her claims to this
territory, however, conflict with those
of the Slavs who inhabit all but a nar-
row fringe along the sea coast.
Italy had demanded recognition and
guaranty of her claims to the territory
on the east Adriatic coast, it was re-
ported, before she would be willing to
place additional forces at the disposal
of the allies for the campaign on the
eastern front.
SELL JUNIORS 'HOP'
TICKETS JAN. 18
Committee Will Try to Punish "Scalp-
ers"; Decorating Con.
tract Let
Tickets for this year's J-hop will
go on sale for juniors only at 12
o'clock on Thursday, Jan. 18, at the
Michigan Union. The sale will con-
tinue for two days. Beginning Satur-
day morning, the sale will be opened
to both juniors and seniors. After
Saturday noon the sale is to be thrown
open to the entire campus. The price
will be the same as last year, $5.00 per
ticket. Places for the various booths
are to be drawn at a later date, not
yet decided by the committee. Ten
tickets will be allowed to each booth.
Unusual punishment is to be meted
out to those students who attempt to
speculate in the pasteboards, accord-
ing to V. H. Simmons, '18,, chairman
of the publicity committee.
Last year a great deal of this scalp-
ing went on, and vigorous efforts are
to be made to prevent such an occur-
rence .taking place again.
The contract for the decorations at
the hop was awarded 'to the Favor Pa-
per Works of Chicago. The programs,
and refreshments have not yet been
fully decided upon, but will be an-
nounced in a few days.
Prof. Cox to Lecture on Roadmaking
"Roads and Roadmaking" is the sub-
ject of the extension lecture to be
given by Prof. J. J. Cox at Hadly to-
morrow night.

ENTENTE REPLY
TO PEACE NOTE
BULLETIN.
New York, Jan. 10.-The entente ie-
ply to President Wilson's peace note
has been handed to Ambassador
Sharpe of Paris, according to official
word reaching Washington tonight. No
intimation of contents will be given
the press until the reply has been of-
ficially received and deciphered.
1,500 ENGINEERS EXPECTED
PRESENT AT BIG MEETING
At the freshman engineer assembly
yesterday Dean M. E. Cooley spoke on
"The Engineer of the Future," and D.
A. Smith, '17E, gave a short talk on
the honor system. An all-engineer as-
sembly at 10:30 o'clock Saturday
morning in University hall was an-
nounced and Dean Cooley expressed
his desire ,for a full attendance in
order to convince the campus that
there actually are 1,500 slide-ruie- de-
votees in its midst.
This will be the first time in the en-
tire history of the Engineering college
that all classes have assembled to-
gether. President Hutchins will give
the address.
REPORTER SAYS LANSING
GATE TIP ABOUT NOTE
Newspaper Man Gives First Contra-
dictory Evidence in Peace
Note Probe
By J. P. YODER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 10.-The first
"contradictory testimony' of the peace
note leak probe came today when
Archie Jamieson, state department re-
porter for the Central News, in de-
scribing how Lansing gave the news-
paper men the confidential tip to the
note, said, "Secretary Lansing had
said he was giving us the information
because he did not want it to come
back in garbled form from abroad and
'injuriously affect the market'."
Representative Lenroot then read
Secretary Lansing's testimony to the
effect that he "had not had the market
in mind" when he gave the tip to the
reporters and imposed secrecy upon
them. William Odlin of Hearst's In-
ternational News Service said the only
information about the note sent out
by the Hearst service was a "caution-
ary message to hold the report for re-
lease."
"Is your service the Hearst service?"
asked Chairman Henry.
"So it is called," replied Odlin.
Chairman Henry wanted to know
who had written an article carrying
an I. N. S. slug line receipt which
Henry said was in effect a statement
that a cabinet official, two senators and
another high government official might
be involved in the leak situation. He
thereupon demanded the names of all
the Hearst staff here, after having tele-
graphed for C. W. Barron of the Wall
Street Journal, and Dow, Jones com-
pany. The commission later decided
to issue a subpoena for him to come
here with his ticker records.
DEMOCRATS IN LEAD
Have Majority of One Over Republi-
cans in Lower House
Washington, Jan. 10.-With Repre-
senative Scully of New Jersey, Demo-
crat, definitely known to be elected,

the house's net session today lined up
as follows: Democrats, 216; Republi-
cans, 215; Progressives, 2; Socialists,
1; Independents, 1.
Prof. T. C. Trueblood Reads "Hamlet"
Prof. T. C. Trueblood will give some
readings from Mark Twain at Alpena
tonight at the request of the Univer-
sity extension department. A recital
on "Hamlet" will be given at Monroe
tomorrow night before Prof. Trueblood
returns to this city.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.
UNIVERSITY CORPS
MUSTERED INTO
NAVAL RESERVES
CAPT. J. FARRAND LEWIS ADMIN-
ISTERS OATH OF ALLEGIANCE
TO MEN
FORM NEW RANKS
AT CALL OF ROLL
Col. Bersey, Pres. Hutchins, Lieut.
Richardson, and Dean Cooley
Make Speeches
Ninety-six university men last night
raised their right hands in solemn sub-
scription to the oath of allegiance to
the United States and thereby became
regularly enrolled members of the
naval militia of the state of Michigan.
Captain J. Farrand Lewis, commander
of the Michigan naval brigade, admin-
istered the vow and formally accepted
the student 'divisions into the state
body. He was attended by a staff of
eight officers.
Ceremonies started at 7 o'clock,
when the University divisions marched
onto the floor in column formation,
preceded by the Varsity band and a
company of 60 blue-jackets. The roll
was called by Lieut. C. B. Lundy, exe-
cutive officer of the Michigan naval
brigade. Each man, as his name was
called, saluted and stepped forward
two paces into a new rank.
When the battalion had been com-
pletely formed on the new line, the
command was turned over to Captain
Lewis, who administered the oath. At
the conclusion of this ceremony, Mar-
garet Cooley, '18, was escorted to the
colors stand by a detachment of of-
ficers from the local units. The bugler
sounded "Colors," and as the last notes
died out, Miss Cooley raised the Ameri-
can flag over the battalion.
Col. John S. Bersey, adjutant-general
of the state of Michigan, representing
Governor Sleeper, in a short speech
following this ceremony, pointed out
that the organization of bodies such
as the one just mustered was the only
force tending to offset America's pres-
ent military weakness.
President Harry B. Hutchins ex-
pressed his approval of the step taken
by those enlisting, and gave it as his
opinion that the body of men before
him would bring no disgrace upon the
University. Lieut. W. G. Richardson,
chief recruiting officer for the naval
reserve, stressed the need of volunteer
military organizations under the pres-
ent American military policy.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of the Col-
lege of Engineering, official represent-
ative of the University, recited some
of his experiences in the navy and
naval reserve and assured the men
they would never regret the step they
had taken. He also pointed out the
opportunities offered by the Univer-
sity in the line of training for military
or naval officers.
At the close of the ceremonies, the
members of the battalion held a meet-
ing in which the following officers
were chosen: Seventh division-Mr.
0. M. McNeil of the Engineering col-
lege, senior lieutenant; Mr. E. A. Har-
rington of the physics department,
junior lieutenant, and K. W. Heinrich,
'17E, ensign. Eighth division-Prof.
A. E. Boak of the history department,
senior lieutenant; Dr. J. R. Hayden of
the political science department, junior

lieutenant, and A. H. Jenkins, '17, en-
sign. These men will be commissioned
immediately by the governor.
Dixie Club Dance Will Start Late
Owing to the conflicting dates of the
Cosmopolitan club's entertainment on
Friday night and the Dixie club dance,
B. R. Penniman, president of the Dixie
club, announces that arrangements
have been made to postpone starting
the dance at the Armory long enough
so that those desiring to do so may
attend the "Magic Carpet."

TOMOKROW NIGHT
4oo 1he MAGIC CARPET
A PLAY OF ORIENTAL MYSTERY
HILL AVDITORIVM 50 cents

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