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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

fIE NEW YEAR
ilres a complete new outfit and it should be up to the standard of
sperity and well being that is sure to hold sway in 1917.
Our clothes measure up to it in Style, Quality and Service.

C'4 e firligau :43a Au
Official newspaper at the University of
Mifrigan. Published every morning except
M.nday during the university year.

G. H. Wild Company
Merchant Tailors

State Street

III

DON 'T THROW AWAY
your Dull Razor Blades
We will sharpen them better than new
.E L. S aWITZER Co
DW ARE 301 State St. SPORTING GOODS

o

New Sxspply of

Laundry Csses

'he Slater Book Shop

U

- E~

di new shoes are stitched with Goodyear Welt machines.
Ve-use same machines for repair work. We believe we
ave the most modern equipped shoe repair shop in Ann
rbor. You'll get high class work and courteous treatment
t this shop and we think you'll find us worthy of patron-
ge. Our call and deliver service is at your disposal. Use it.

Famous Shoe Repairing Co.
hONE 807 301 S. State St.

Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Ofices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $2.50; by mail, $.oo
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; tudents' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414. :
Communications not to exceed Soo words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-1
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the westj
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7: 3 o'clock each1
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager1
Conrad N. Church......-.......News Editor
Lee E Joslyn-.....-...... .-City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald......... Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Verne E. Burnett...........Assoiate Editor
Golda Ginsburg.-.........Women's Editr
Carleton W. Reade--------.Statistical Editor
Marian Wilson ............. Literary Editor
E. Campbell . .Assistant Business Manager
C Philip Emery.. Assistant Business Manager
Alert Horne.. Assistant Business Manager
Rosco R. Ra... Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter.. .Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
. L. Stadeker E. L. Zeigler
C. M. Jickling H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth
Reporters
W. A. Atlas Allen Shoenfeld
H. C. Garrison C. L. Roeser
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. H. Fricken G. 0. Brophy
B. I. Millar F. A. Taber
D. H. Cruttenden a Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L.rWood J. C. Martin
T. F. MAllister
Business Staff
Bernard Wohl J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
emur B. Wilson
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1916.
Night Editor-Harry M. Carey.
THE MAGIC CARPET
Friday night we will be given a ride
on the Magic carpet. Back to the lands
in the far east we will travel under
the guidance of the foreign students
of the University. The entertain-
ment is the second annual play or
spectacle to be held under the au-
spices of the Cosmopolitan club. The
purpose of the undertaking is two
fold. First, to raise money for a loan
fund for foreign students. Second, to
bring the campus as a whole into
closer touch with the ideals and cus-
toms of the students from other lands.
Although the performance last year
was unsuccessful financially, we are
glad that the foreign students did not
abandon their undertaking. They have
profited by the mistakes of the first
production and with the experiences
of last year to guide them should pres-
ent a play successful in every way.
We are looking forward to the per-
formance of "The Magic Carpet" Fri-
day night in Hill auditorium.
SLIPPERY SIDEWALKS
Ann Arbor is a city possessing con-
scious civic pride. Its residents and
its city officials are awake to many
progressive steps in municipal im-
provement. But Ann Arbor is at the
present time enduring an unnecessary
evil - -slippery, slushy sidewalks.
Though there have been several op-
portunities on warm days to clean off
the thawing slush and ice, most of the
walks have been neglected. The pres-
ent condition of the walks is a dis-
grace, and we hope that Ann Arbor
householders will take advantage of
the next thaw to clean their walks.
EXPERIMENTS FOR THINING
TREES STARTED BY FORESTERS

ANNOUNCEMENT

t eiess a poster was pr epareu y Ul
Department of Naval Militia Affairs at
Washington and subsequently placed
upon the campus bulletin boards, an-
swering the majority of the questions
asked. In addition it referred all pat-
riotic citizens and "prospective mem-
bers" to the above mentioned depart-
ment and its local representatives for
further information. Insomuch as an
answer has again been asked for, and
this request supported by an editorial
in The Daily, we are glad to take this
opportunity of answering the particu-
lar questions asked.
(1). The local units are organized
under the Naval Militia Acts of Feb.
16, 1914; and the Army and Navy Bill
of Sept. 15, 1916.
(2). Under the above mentioned
Army and Navy Bill members of the
local organization are eligible to be-
come members of the National Naval
Volunteer, upon passing examinations
which are prescribed by the Secretary
of the Navy, and set forth in General
Orders No. 153 of the Navy depart-
nment.
(3). In answering this question
there is printed an extract from the
above mentioned posters, Paragraph 2.
"The primary object of the Naval Mil-
itia is to train its members in time
of peace so that in time of war they
can serve their country creditably
and intelligently.'
(4). The Naval Militia is "eligible
to be called forth by the President of
the United States to serve the United
States in time of war, actual or threat-
ened, with any foreign nation, involv-
ing danger of invasion, and rebellion
against the authority of the United,
States government, or when the Pres-
ident, in his judgment, is unable with
the regular forces at his command to
execute the laws of the United States."
Sec. 3, General Orders,153.
(Signed) JOSEPHUS DANIELS,
Secretary of the Navy.
(5). Members of the Naval Militia
can secure discharges for the follow-
ing reasons among others:
(a) Change of residence from dis-
trict in which armory is located.
(b) Physical disability.
c) Expiration of enlistment.
(d) Press of business.
Or if removing to another ditrict of
this state where a similar division is
established, they will be transferred
to it for the balance of their enlist-
ment.
(6). Pending legislation now under
consideration at Washington it is im-
possible at the present time to state
whether these men would be handled
as a division or otherwise, in case of
war.
(7). Every member of the Naval
Militia is liable for service. The legal
military age is 18 years and not 21.
K. WARREN HEINRICH.
C. M. M., M.-N. E.

R1 iRew d~ear's
Greeting
to ICI

SAM BURCHFIELD

I 11l1111111lll ll llilliltllllillll lll1 i i1lllillllllilllllt ll11 1 1ll ll illillilll1 11 11 1
ANSWERS NAVAL QESTIONS
Handy Desk Calender
CAN SECURE DISCHARGES FOR
FOUR REASONS- MILITARY AGE Awhole years comfort for
18 YEARS.,,
To the Editor of The Michigan Daily: 7 a
On Dec. 15, 1916, a certain commun-
ication appeared in the columns of=^
The Michigan Daily asking seveu ques- Diaries and Office Supplies in general at
tions in regard to the Naval reserve.
As these questions had already been
adequately answered in a public meet- -
ing by Captain J. Farrand Lewis, com-
manding the First Battalion of Mich-
igan, and also in the local press, it -
was not deemed necessary to repeat = VNIVER.SITY BOOKSTORES
the information in The Daily. Never-
4hnlracc n nn,-flb ir a -n -rc no r da-i rb the :____________ _____[___________________________________________________

Take your Amateur Finishing
TO
DAINEIS

Y

&cO

Gives you the best Tailoring service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

06 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

,.,.

We Offer You
SECURITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION
Resources $3,800,000
Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest corner Main and Huron
Branch Office- -
707 North University Ave.
e Farniers & Mechanics Bank
Ofers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
venient and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
Pleased With our Service. Two offices
-105 S. Main St.: 330'S. State St.
EYPLWMITERS of all naIkes
sale or Rent. Oleaning I
Rop&&r71ng, 97PEW1ITIG &
IeOG 2AT GING sUPLIES
322 S. State 582-J
m 12 - 2 Special Tea and Rice Served
PLAI N

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Bstween Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars ran on )Eastern time, one bour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
m., 8::o a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:10.
p. M.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m and
every two hours to 6:48 p. In.; to Lansing,
8:49 P. 2"n.
Jackson Express Cars.-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)--9:48 a. In. and every two hours
to 7:48 P. n.
Lcal Cars Eastbound-:34 a. m., 6:4o a.
in., y : e3 a. m.. and every two hours to 7':05 P.
tn., Sm.5 p, m., 9:o5 p. m., io:5o p. m. to
Ypsilanti only, 9:2o a. m., g:5o a. m., :o5 p.R
Va., 6:05 p. in., 11:45 P. im., I :10 a. mn., 1 :20~
a. m. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6:os a. m., 7:5. a.
., i:ao p. in.. 12:2o a. m-.
i Takes Pictures
a g Develops films
makes Prints
and Enlarge-
713 IE.. NIVE6RStTY
aNM~pg a wtP rTHg A arm C oc ks
SH DE E V S Y 1 $ 1 .0 0 u p
Fountain Pens-
Waterman and Conklin
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
MODERN BARBER SHOP
332 State St.
A Particular Place
for Particular People.
FRANK C. BOLCH, Propi
ing the holidays, should report to the
director at the gymnasium at once.
Members of the board of representa-
tives of the Women's league should
have the questionaires which were
sent to them on the vocational con-
ference, filled out and ready for re-
port at the meeting, Saturday, Jan. 13.
An opportunity is afforded for a col-
lege girl to secure her room and board
by doing part time work. Applicants
should see the dean of women at once.
Masques will meet at 4 o'clock to-
morrow afternoon with Lavinia Mc-
.Bride, '18, at 1221 Willard street.
Mortarboard will meet at 7:30
o'clock, at the Delta Gamma huse.

QJUARRY DRUG CO'S.
Prescription Store
Cot. State & N. University
WOMAN STUDENT CONTRACTS
ChICKEN-POX AT IOWA CITY
Iowa City, Ia., Jan. 9.-One of the
women at the University of Iowa has
contracted chicken-pox. The disease
broke out originally in some Iowa City
homes, but this is its first spread to
the university boundaries.
The authorities at Iowa assert that
there is but slight fear of any ex-
tensive spread of the disease in the
university, as all who have In any way
been exposed are being watched care-
fully for signs of its development.
REUBEN PETERSON, JR., '14,
RETURNS; RESIGNS POSITION
Reuben Peterson, Jr., '14, son of
Prof. R. Peterson of the Medical fac-
ulty, is back in Ann Arbor. Peterson
has been working on the Poughkeep-
sie Evening Enterprise in Poughkeep-
sie, N. Y., and resigned his position as
city editor to devote his time to the
writing of special articles.
Peterson was succeeded on the En-
terprise by F. F. McKinney, '16L, ed-
itor of the Michigan Daily last year.

THE
Varsity Toggery
SHOP
11071S.University St.
Extends the greetings of the new
year to
MEN OF MICHIGAN
for a happy and successful year.
CHOP off a few
minutes and eat some of
GEORGE'S SVEY
WAI KING 1600
314 S. State St. Phone 1244-M
Smith College Announces Fellowships
Six fellowships, of the value of $500
each, and without charge for tuition,
have been announced, by Smith col-
lege, for women graduates, of not less
than one year's standing, either of
Smith college or of other colleges of
recognized standing. The holders of
these fellowships are required to -act
as assistants, not in teaching, and for
not more than six hours a week. Ap-
pointments are not restricted to any
one department. Applications must be
filed by Feb. 5. Fuller information may
be secured at the office of the dean of
women.
Girls attention! For rainwater
shampoos and scalp treatment for
falling hair go to Mrs. J. R. Trojanow-
ski, 1110 S. University, side entrance.
Phone 696-W. 5-two wks

...

r-

IP SUEY

- 25c

der entirely NEW management
k Service, Wholesome Food, and
mable price.
Drop in and Try

hi an Inn 611
Telephone 948-R

E. Liberty

WJjomen I

Experiments aiming to develop an
effective method of thinning tree
species have been started on the Uni-
versity forestry farm under the super-
vision of Prof. L. J. Young, of the For-
estry department. These experiments
are being tried out on selected stands
of white and scotch pine planted 12
years ago, and will extend over a per-
iod of 80 years.
Similar experiments have been tried
out in Europe with the result that an
increase as high as 100 -percent has
been gained in the commercial value
of the timber experimentd upon. In
this country the problem is consider-
ably more complex because of the var-
iety of soils and trees.
This is the first experiment of the
kind ever started in this state and will
be watched with considerable interest
by men who are interested in timber.
First results will appear in about ten
or fifteen years.
Michigan Dames Hear Dr. A. L. Jacoby
At a meeting of the Michigan Dames
held last night at Newberry hall, Dr.
A. L. Jacoby of the University hos-
pital gave a talk on the "Freudian
Theory." Captains were elected for
the membership campaign to continue
for the next two weeks.

Gentlemen's shirts-
conservative patterns -
not the common kind-
all this week and next--
Jany. 6 to 20 -at our,
clearance sale prices -
quoting prices will not
show you the shirts-see
our south show window
display.

7
An
/

I

I

ids,

VE NVS
10c PENCIL
o matter - ahat course you're
taking you need this famious
pencilI
B ECAUSE of the sup-
Berlative quality of
material and workman-
ship, VENUS is admit-
tedly the finest pencil
it is possible to make.
If you like a thick
soft lead that marks so
that you can read the
writing half way across
the room, choose the soft de-
grees 63-53-4B. #-
For short-hand notes or easy
writing 33-23-3 (medium soft)
are popular.
For sketching, gen-
eral writing purposes,
etc., HB-F-H-2H (med-
ihm) will prove desir-
able..
For drafting, a med-
ium hard pencil gives V
the best results and
you'll like
3H-4-5H-6H.
For very thin, narrow lines
for extremely accurate graphical
charts, maps, details, etc.,
7H-8H-9H are available.
FREE Look for the distinctive
water-mark finish . on each
of the 17 black degrees and
hard and medium copying,
Your professors will confirm
these statements as to the mer-
its of VENUS pencils.
For sale at the college book
store.

I

enior women will hold an important
ting at 4 o'clock this afternoon in
n 101 Economics building.
eneva club will not meet until
rsday, Jan. 18.
rhe Sense for Ideal Values" will
he subject- of the talk by Prof. J.
3rumm of the rhetoric department
respers, at 5 o'clock Thursday aft-
oon in Newberry hall. -
irls who wish to secure honor
its for hikes and skating done dur-,

m '.A

I'i

I

American Lead Pencil Co.
215 Fifth Ave. Dept. DD
New York
Note: Send us your
name and address
s ~ and we shaul be
pleased to have sent
to you for test a box
E of VENUS
drawing
4 N pencils,
VENUS
pencil and
VENUS
FREE Eraser

41

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