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January 09, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-09

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THE WEATHER
CLEAR AND COLDER
TODAY

I

AV ~
g0 wlrta

:43 t t

UNITED PREL
DAY AND NIGH'
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 72.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1917.

PRICE FIVE C

AEXAMINATIONS IN
COLLEGE OF LAW
SCHEDULE FOR FIRST SEMESTER
TESTS MADE PUBLIC
YESTERDAY
PERIOD TO BEGIN FEB, I
AND WILL END FEB. 9
All Examinations to Continue Four
Hours; Students Must Not
Use Names
The schedule of final exalminations
for the Law school sas given out by
the office yesterday is as follows:
On Friday or Saturday preceeding
the examination, each student is to
hand in to the office as many standard
size blue books, containing not less
than 40 pages, as he has subjects.
Blue books and scratch paper -will
then be given out by the instructors
at the time of examinations. No stu-
dent is to write his name on any part
of the blue books he uses as a means
of identification, but must use the
number which was posted opposite his
name on the bulletin board earlier in
the semester. Each examination will
last tour hours, unless it is finished
sooner, and each will start promptly
at the time given below:
First Year Class.
Thursday, Feb. 1-Property 1..8 a. m.
Friday, Feb. 2-Torts..... ....2 p. m.
Monday, Feb. 5-Criminal law..8 a. m.
Wednesday, Feb. 7-Con-
tracts 1.....................8 a. m.,
Second Year Class.
Wednesday, Jan. 31-Trusts...2 p. m.
Monday, Feb. 5-Property III. .2 p. in.
Third Year Class.
Thursdayr, Feb. 1-Constitu-
tional law ... ..........2 p. m.
Saturday, Feb. 3-Trial Prac-
tice ....................2 p. m.
Electives.
Wednesday, Jan. 31-Prop-
erty IV ...............8 a. m.
Suretyship ..............8 a. m.
Thursday, Feb. 1-Consti-
tutional la .............2 p, m.
Friday, Feb. 2-Bailments and
carriers................8 a. m.
Friday, Feb. 2-Public officers .2 p. m.
Saturday, Feb. 3-Sales.......8 a. m.
Monday, Feb. 5-Insurance. ...8 a. m.
Monday, Feb. 5.-Federal
courts .....................8 a. m.
" Tuesday, Feb. 6-Conflict of
laws .....................8 a. m
Tuesday, Feb. 6-Bills and
notes .... ... .........t. p. m.
Wednesday, Feb. 7-Irrigation
law ... ................8 a. m.
Thursday, Feb. 8-Equity juris-
prudence II.. ..... .8 a. m.
Thursday, Feb. 8-Judgments.2 p. mn.
Friday, Feb. 9-Public serv- .
ilelaw ..................8a.mi.
Friday, Feb. 9-Mining law 8 a. M.
WANTS WILSON'S SALARY
FOR WALL ST. LOSERS

OVER 200 MEN COMPETE
FOR PLACES IN OPERA
Chayles Morgan, Jr., Directs Chorus
Tryouts Last Night at
┬░Union
Over 200 men tried out for places
in the chorus of the 1917 Michigan
Union opera at the Union last night.
This is the largest turnout that ever
has been present at any chorus tryout
since the Mimes started presenting an
annual opera. The first cut reduced
this number to 115, but Charles Mor-
gan, Jr., who personally conducted the
tryouts, acting as judge, considered
this number much too large, so a sec-
ond elimination was held, cutting the
total down to approximately 85.
Yesterday afternoon a meeting of the
cast was held at which time the book
was read and discussed. Mr. Morgan
had several minor corrections to make,
but expressed himself as being very
well pleased with it as it stood.
On Wednesday afternoon, the first
real cast rehearsal will be held at the
Union and on Wednesday night the
chorus will meet for its first practice.
Practically all those who survived the
cut last night will be carried on the
chorus till after the start of the new
semester when the final cut will be
made.
The list or chorus men will be posted
in the Union this afternoon and will
also appear in tomorrow's Daily.
PROF. S. de MARTONNE
TO SPEAK ON ROUMANIA

Noted

Geographer' to

Give .Ta

Wednesday and Thursday, on
Interesting Areas

alks,

Prof. Samuel de Martonne, profess-
of of geography in the Sorbonne,
Paris, will lecture We'dnesday and
Thursday afternoons in the auditor-j
ium of the Natural Science building,
speaking on the subjects of "The Bat-
tle Fields of France" and "Roumania."
Professor, de Martonne has been giv-
ing lectures at Columbia University
and Cornell University and is on his
way to the University of Chicago to lec-
ture. The lectures are given under
the auspices of the University and are
to be illustrated with lantern slides.
Dr. de Martonne, though only about
40 years of age, is one of the most dis-
tinguished geographers living, and the
best authority upon the areas which
he is to discuss. The predicament in
which Roumania finds itself today,
lends special interest to the second
lecture.
Owing to the ceremony in connec-
tion with the formal enrollment of
men of the naval reserves on Wednes-
day, the time of the first lecture which
had been set for 8 o'clock .in the even-
ing, has been made 4 o'clock in the
afternoon, so that both lectures will
be given at the same hour on succes-
sive days. Admission is free.
DEBATERS TO ELIMINATE'
Each Talks Eight Minutes in Mid-West
League Tryouts Jan. 18
The first eliminations of the 24 men
now on the debating squad competing
for places on the teams that will de-
bate in the Mid-west Debating league
will be held next Saturday, Jan. 13, in
room 302 Mason hall.
The tryouts will commence at 8
o'clock in the morning and each
speaker will be given eight minutes in
which to make his constructive speech.
The following men are now on the
squad:
Jeffersonian: S. G. Ogden, '17L, P.
A. Miller, '17L, S. D. Frankel, '17L, H.
L. McCarthy, '17L, R. A. McGinnis,
'17L, and E. B. Houseman, '17L.
Webster: T. H. McCormack, '17L,
L. W. Lisle, '17L, T. McDonald, '17L,
A. P. Bogue, '18L, N. D. Ireland, '18L,
and L. B. Harper, '18L.
Alpha Nu: C. E. Hutton, '17, H. B.
Teegarden, '17, C. E. Bailey, '17, R. W.
Ward, '17, C. W. Miller, '19, and M.
W. Welch, '17.
Adelphi: G. W.Hulbert, '17, H. F.'
Massnick, '18, B. F. Magruder, '18, J.
R. Simpson, '18, J. W. Planck, '18, and
R. F. Kahle, '17.
The men will speak in alphabetical
order.
Murgia's Carranza Troops Hold Parral
El Paso, Jan. 8.-General Murgia's
column of Carranza troops occupied
Parral at 7 o'clock last night, captur-
ing nine locomotives and 100 cars
taken from Torreon by Villistas. The

GIVE PARTICULAS
FOR WARTRINING
President Harry B. Hutchins Makes
Official Announcement to Men
of Michigan
MEET STUDENTS PERSONALLY
NEXT FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Notice Appertains Only to Men of
Literary and Engineering
Colleges
President Harry B. Hutchins offici-
ally announced yesterday. a special
notice regarding a course in Military
instruction to be given in. the Univer-
sity. On Friday and Saturday of this
week, President Hutchins will meet
students of the Literary, Engineering
and, Architectural colleges and explain
the requirements in order to ascer-
tain the number who wish to elect
such a course.
The notice as given out by Presi-
dent Hutchins is as follows:
Military Instruction
Special notice to Literary, Engin-
eering, and Architectural students.
* In order to secure a detail, for pur-
poses of military instruction, of an
army officer under the act of con-
gress approved June 3, 1916, and gen-
eral orders No. 48, as amended, the
university authorities must, among
other things, "agree to maihtain un-
der the prescribed military training
not less than one hundred physically
fit male students." At a recent meet-
ing of the committee on Military in-
struction, appointed by the Regents
of the University, it was voted that, if
the faculties of the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, and the
Colleges of Engineering and Architec-
ture decide to give the time for mil-
itary studies specified in said general
orders, as amended, the President be
directed to call meetings in the sub-
ject of military training, in order to
ascertain the number who desire to
elect work of this character. The.
above named faculties having approv-
ed the scheme as outlined in general
orders 48, as amended, the President
hereby calls meetings as follows:
For Literary Students. Friday aft-j
ernoon, January 12, at 4:15 o'clock,
University hall.
For Engineering and Architectural
Students. Saturday morning, January
13, at 10:30 o'clock, University hall.
At these meetings the President will
explain fully the requirements of gen-
eral orders 48, as amended, and as to
what will be expected of students who
elect the military work. .
Dated, January 8, 1917.
H. B. HUTCHINS,
President.
PROF. ALBERT JOHNSON
TO GIVE SPANISH TALK
Third Lecture of Cercle Francas tot
Be Given This After-.
noon
Prof. Albert Johnson of the depart-1
ment of romance languages, will de-1
liver the third lecture of the Cerclef
Francais course for the year at 5
o'clock, this afternoon, in Tappan hall.
In this lecture Professor Johnson re-i
lates the incidents of a trip throught
Spain on foot. The admission price
to students will be 50 cents and thet
public $1.00. t
The Cercle Francais will also hold<

a meeting at 7 o'clock in the Cercle
rooms in order to make arrangements
for the entertainment of the actors of
the "Theatre Independent Francais d'
Amerique" company which will ap-t
pear in Ann Arbor, Jan. 16, under the
auspices of the French, faculty andl
the Cercle Francais.
Henry S. Canby Lectures on Fiction
Henry S. Canby author of "College
Sons and College Fathers" will speak
in West hall at 11 o'clock today. 1

Washington, Jan. 8.-The house late
today passed the agriculture bill car-
rying approximately $25,000,000, and
providing $50,000 for an investigation
proposed by Representative Mann of
Illinois of manipulation of food pro-
ducts and methods of their production,
transportation, storage, preparation,
marketing and manufacture. The house
previously had adopted an amendment
giving employees who get less than
$1,200 a year a ten per cent increase
in salary with five per cent increases
for those getting between $1,200 and
$1,800.
El Paso, Jan. 8.-Four cases of
meningitis in the Eighth Ohio national
guard infantry with one death caused
a quarantine to be clamped down on
one company of guardsmen in that
regiment today. George W. Appelby of
Company F died today and his cousin,
Robert Jenkins, of the same company,
has been stricken with the disease.
Ottawa, Can., Jan. 8.-Casualties to
the Canadian forces to the end of De-
cember aggregate 68,290, made up as
follows: Killed, 10,854; died of wounds,
4,010; died of sickness, 494; presumed
dead, 1,108; wounded, 48,454; missing,
2,970. Of this number, 53,837 casual-
ties occurred in 1916.
Dallas, Tex., Jan. 8.--Federal Judge
Meek today instructed the federal
grand jury to investigate charges of
peonage in northern Texas. The court
stated that the United States district
attorney has collected evidence that
large land owners have held negroes
in bondage on the ground that the
negroes were indebted to them.
Pittsburg, Jimu. 8.-Robert J. Dodds,
member of a Pittsburg law firm and
close friend of the family of W. A.
Lewis, was on his way to Philadelphia
today to co-operate with representa-
tives of the aged broker's there who
are investigating the death of Bernard
W. Lewis, the Colbert case suicide.
Washington, Jan. 8.-A spirited de-
fense of the present volunteer 'system
of national defense was made before
the home military committee this aft-
ernoon by Major William C. Harllee,
marine corps.

1
R
L
7
L
s
l
'r

SPECIAL EXAM HOURS

The following final examina-
tions not announced in the
printed sheets distributed to
students are especially sched-
uled as follows:
Economics 1-First Thursday,
9 to 12 o'clock.
Philosophy 7 (psychology)
First Monday, 2 to 5 o'clock.
* * * * * * * * * * *

*
*
*
*
*
*
*$
*
*
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*

BROKER

RECRUITING FOR NATAL
RESERVES__COMPLETED
Twenty-Five Percent of Candidates
Rejected in Physical Ex-
amination
With the divisions already over-
crowded, recruiting for the University
naval reserves closed last night, two
full days before the mustering cere-
mony. This, in view of the fact that
25 percent of those examined were
rejected. Under the efficient system
organized by J. P. Poppen, '17M, as-
sistant medical officer of the battalion,
forty-three men were looked over in
four days of examinations, giving an'
average of better than ten a day.
Final plans for the ceremonies to-
marrow night have practically been
completed. Permission has been .se-
cured for the attendance of the Var-
sity band, which is to lead the divis-
ions on the floor and play the national
anthem. It will also sound the bugle
calls necessary for the proper per-
formance of the mustering. On ac-
count of the inexperience of the stand-
ard-bearers in matters of flag-salutes,
the battalion flags will not be raised
at the mustering, as was heretofore
stated, but will be hung in a promin-
ent place in the gymnasium.
Definite word has not yet been re-
ceived from Governor Sleeper as to
the possibility of his attending to-
morrow's ceremonies but it is thought
that he will be unable to do so. Ad-
jutant-general Bersey, Captain Lewis,
and Lieut. Richardson and their
staffs will, however, be present, ar-
riving from Detroit on the Michigan
Central late Wednesday afternoon. It
has been decided to hold a reception
for the officers in the trophy room of
the gymnasium immediately after the
conclusion of the mustering.
President Harry B. Hutchins has ap-
pointed Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of
the College of Engineering, to speak
for the University at tomorrow night's
formalities. Dean Cooley has had
wide experience in naval affairs him-
self, being a graduate of the Naval
academy and a former officer in the
United States navy. He was at one
time assistant engineer of the Mich-
igan naval brigade, the same organi-
zation with which the local divisions
will be affiliated.
NO PLACE FOR HYPHENS AT
MEETING OF S. A. R. TONIGHT
An "Americanization meeting," un-
der the auspices of the Washtenaw
chapter of the Sons of the American
revolution, will be given at 8 o'clock
tonight in the high school auditorium..
Mr. Milton E. Osbornwill act as pre-
siding officer of the meeting and the
main address will be given by Merton
A. Sturges of Chicago, chief natural-
ization examiner, Honorable J. E. Beal,
regent of the University, will give the
address of welcome. The musical pro-
gram is under the direction of Mr. T.
H. Trost.

DECLARES NEWS COMES
FROM TRUSTY SOURCE
Representative Chiperfield and Witness
Threaten Personal Clash
Over Question
By J. P. YODER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 8.-Thomas W.
Lawson declared this afternoon he had
been told by a member of congress
that a member of President Wilson's
cabinet had speculated in stocks on
advance information of the president's
note to belligerents. The Boston fi-
nancier made the charge at this after-
noon's session of the house rules com-
mittee probing the note leak to Wall
street.
A near personal clash between Law-
son and Representative Chiperfield fol-
lowed when Lawson refused to divulge
names. Chiperfield demanded that
Lawson be reported to the house that
"he might be dealt with for contempt."
Lawson declined to give the names, he

Pr ass Farm BWill
For $25,000o,000
House of Representatives Approves
Act Providing for H. C. of L.
Probe

LIAWSON CHARGES CABINET MEMBER
WITH SPECULATION AS RESULT OF
ADVANCE PEACE NOTE INFORMATI1

MAKES SPECTU

STATEMENTS
CONGRESS

BEFORE
QUIZ

DRY STATES CAN'T
LIQUORS BY MAIL+

.4

GET
ORDERS

Representative Kent Urges Use of
Month's Pay of Officials
as Leak Reprisal

One

Supreme Court Upholds Decision of
Maryland with Reference to
West Virginia
Washington, Jan. 8.-Construing the
Webb-Kenyon act, the supreme court
today affirmed a Maryland court's de-
cision refusing to penalize the West-
ern Maryland railroad and the Adams
Express company for refusing to ship
liquor into "dry" West Virginia.
Attorney for the distillers argued
that soliciting by mail and delivery
by an express company did not con-
stitute a sale within the dry state,
which is forbidden by the Webb-Ken-
yon act. The lower court reversed
itself after reopening the case and de-
cided that it did.
The Kenyon law by the court's de-
cision was held constitutional. The
decree is of nation-wide importance,
affecting every prohibition state. Chief
Justice White, who read the opinion,
upheld the Kenyon law in its broadest
sense.
"Congress," he said, "has the. un-
doubted power to prevent interstate
commerce being used, to violate state
laws."
The structure of government, he
said, rests on co-operation of state and
nation. The decision is a severe blow
at distillers who had contended inter-
state commerce laws did not have any-
thing to do with state laws.

said, because he learned them in
confidentialftalk. The Chiperfield me
tion came after numerous brushes wit
Lawson; who seemed to take the greal
est delight in baiting the represents
tive. Lawson wanted to stop th
"hideousness" of the system by whic
"widows are robbed through leaks,
he said.
"Well, help us out by naming thi
congressman who named a cabine
member," Campbell pressed.
Lawson Refuses to Give Name.
Lawson replied: "I am anxious t
have this situation cleared up, bu
that is one fact that you won't ge
from me."
Lawson claimed to have corrobor
ated the congressman's statemen
about the cabinet members through
banker friend.
"And the banker said that matter
were such that the party with whoa
the cabinet member dealt wgs so clos
to the cabinet member that he coul(
get the latter out of bed at 5 o'clocl
in the morning to talk with him,
Lawson went on.
"Was the cabinet member suppose
to have speculated himself?" aske
Garrett.
"He was as closely connected wit
the leak as if he had speculated," sai
Lawson. Lawson again questioned th,
authority of the committee to investi
gate.
"I think it is the height of imprc
priety for the witness to question th
authority of the committee," inter
rupted Chiperfield.
Flouts Committee's Authority.
"I don't care what the committee'
authority is or what the committe
does or thinks," Lawson replied, "
only know you have me here and
wish you would let me go home."
Lawson brought in the name c
Barry Baruch, but an attempted eulog
of him was halted.
"Baruch will talk for himself," th
committee men said.
"Well, it seems to me there has bee
an attempt to make somebody the goa
maybe me," said Lawson.
"I don't give a damn," said Lawso
when Chairman Henry ruled the wil
ness must not make side remarks. "
will make them if they are made t
me."
"The break in the market would hav
come without a leak," added Lawson

Washington, Jan. 8.-Assessment of
one month's pay of the "president,
each And every representative, senator,
cabinet officer, stenographer and clerk"
to-help pay losses of Wall street specu-
lators on the leak on the presidential
note was proposed today in a resolu-
tion by Representative Kent of Cali-
fornia.
The resolution provides that all
losses of speculators from Dec. 18 to 24
be paid, and that the contingent fund
of the house be drawn on, if neces-
sary, to help the officials pay it.
Kent declared there had been fric-
tion between the "correlative branches
of the government" located respective-
ly in Wall street and Washington, D.
C., and while the Washington branch
thought peace advisable, Wall street
believed in war.
To Put on Real Zula Dance in Show
One of the cleverest and most art-
istic bits of dancing will be seen in
"The Magic Carpet," on Jan. 12, in
Hill auditorium, when George Lubke,
'19D, will interpret the Zula dance.
This dance is well known in the re-

REPETITION OF CHRISTMAS MUSIC
Pease Auditorium, Ypsilanti
NORMAL CHOIR 200 SINGERS
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Conductor
Wednesday, January 10, 8 P. M.
Ann Arbor patrons holding season tickets to normal concert course
will be admitted on these tickets. NO SEATS RESERVED.

Predicts Another "Leak."
Several Hurt When Car Leaves Rails "Another and a worse one will con
The Detroit, Jackson and Chicago in a few weeks. Then you will kno-
limited car that left Detroit at 9 what I am talking about. I wanted :
o'clock yesterday morning and due in to start this committee in the way to
Ann Arbor at 10:45 o'clock, was de- real investigation so that this hellis
railed at Inkster, near Dearborn, and business might be stopped.".
crashed into a telephone pole and a big "Again I would call your attentia
tree, splintering both and causing to the fact that you are not in a bar,
minor injuries to a number of pas- said Campbell.
sengers. The injured were taken to "Oh, hell isn't bad," Lawson ar
Ypsilanti for care. No one was serf- swered. -"Let me lecture you a bit."
ously hurt. As far as could be ascer- The row was halted by Henry.
tained yesterday, no students were on The committee adjourned at 4:2
the car at the time. - until 9:30 tomorrow morning.

abited 1

- the abor- small garrison of Villistas fled
Murgia's approach.

upon

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