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January 07, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-07

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UNITED PR

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DAY A-ND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

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VOL. XXVII. No. 71.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 7, 1917.

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. PRICE FIVE CEr

------

1

CONGRESS PROBE
TO STARTMONDAY
Tumulty, ,Secretary Lansing and T.
W. Lawson to Be
Called
PROOF OF LEAK IN PEACE NOTE
SHOWN IN COMMITTEE MEETING
Hearing Expected to Be One of Big-
gest Affairs in History
of Congress
By J. P. YODER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Jan. 6.-Congress on
edge tonight awaited the rap of Chair-
roan Henry's gavel on Monday when
Secretary Tumulty, Secretary Lansing,
"Frenzied Finance" Lawson, and prac-
tically every financial writer in Wash-
ington and perhaps a half dozen big
capitalists of Wall street will appear
at the house rules committee investi-
gation of the leak to Wall street on
President Wilson's peace note.
The hearing will be one of the big-
gest things in the probing line that
congress with all its investigations has
seen in years. It was established at
the committee's hearings today beyond
question of doubt that there was a
leak. Democrats said openly that the
hearings will be "flivvers." They de-
clared that nothing can be done to
any financial writer even if it should
be'proved one of them was responsible
for the leak.
They admitted it would be different'
if the man who spread the story is
an embassy employee. They also ad-
mitted that the hearings might result
in legislation to prevent future occur-
rences. Republicans declare that un-
less the rules commnittee reports favor-;
ably for an investigation, they will'
make the biggest floor fight the house1
has seen in years.
LELAND POWERS SPEAKS JAN. 13
Will Give Recital of Shaw's "The
Devil's Disciple"
Leland Powers, reader, will appear
in Ann Arbor for the nineteenth time
when he gives his recital of "The
Devil's Disciple," by George Bernard'
Shaw, in University Hall, Saturday,
Jan. 13. Mr. Powers commenced ac-
tive platform work in 1898 and since
that time every year has found himF
delivering at least one recital in Ann{
Arbor. -
Mr. Powers is without doubt ther
foremost reader appearing before the
American public today and as the
head of the Leland Powers School of
the Spoken Word, which he foundedf
in 1904, he has attained added fame as
a teacher.s
Tickets will go on sale Wednesday,f
Jan. 10, at Wahr's bookstore. A lim-
ited number of reserved seats will be1
sold.
CHINESE STUDENTS ELECT
OFFICERS FOR COMING YEAR
Members of the "Chinese Students'
club at their regular monthly meeting"
elected the following officers for the
coming year: President, F. C. Liu,E
18; vice-president, Niiung Ting, '20M;,
corresponding secretary, L. W. Thoms,a
'18E; treasurer, C. F. Tang, '18M; as-
sistant treasurer, C. K. Chow, '18; au-
ditor, T. P. Lee, '19M.

The Chinese Students' club will re-
ceive Mr. Julian Arnold, the attache
of the American legation at Pekin,'
Monday, Jan. 15.{
Moon Enters Total Eclipse Tonight1
The Ann Arbor public will witness1
a total eclipse of the moon tonight. The
moon will enter the shadow at 11:50
o'clock and will be in total obscurity
at 1 o'clock. At 2:29 o'clock Monday
morning it will begin to leave the
shadow and will be in full view againt
at 3:38 o'clock.1

To Hold Tryouts
for Chorus Parts
Will Take Place at Union Tomorrow;
Morgan to Be One of
Judges

Tryouts for chorus parts in the 1917
Michigan Union Opera to be given by
the Mimes or the University of Michi-
gan Union will be held Monday night
at the Union at 7 o'clock. Director
Charles Morgan, Jr., will be present
at this tryout and will be one of the
judges. Those who try out will be
judged solely on their ability to dance
with a partner.
Plans for the annual- trip to be tak-
en during the spring recess are pro-
gressing rapidly and it is assured that
at least six out of town engagements
will be played at that time; with the
prospect that several more will be ar-
ranged at a later date.
GORNETZKY WRITES NEW SONG
"The Dinkey-Bird" to Make Appear-
ance in "Magic Carpet"
Indifferent to his number of song
siccesses, Abraham Gornetky, '17,
has composed an irrestible sweeping
melody, which immediately after its
appearance in "The Magic Carpet" is
certain to take the campus by storm.
"The Dinkey-Bird" is the title of the
song, and will be sung by Frank
Grover, '18, in the Hawaiian act of the
play.
"The Dinkey-Bird" is a poem written
by Eugene Field. It is rhythmical and
naturally adaptable to a melody. Also.
it is of a literary nature, and is not in-
clined to the commonplace composi-
tions that form the substance of man
ragtime pieces. The poem has been
set to music before, but not after the
fashion of Gornetzky. 'In the present
form "The Dinkey-Bird" is a captivat-
ing strain, and will prove a feature in
"The Magic Carpet" on Jan. 12.
Tht song is being published by Mrs.
Root of the University Music House.
The title page will be identical with
poster of the -play. Permission was
obtained from Scribner Sons to use the
lyrics before any action was deter-
mined upon.
STURGES TO TALK JANUARY 9
ON NATURALIZATION PROBLEMS
Hon. Merton A. Sturges, chief ex-
aminer of the United States bureau
of naturalization, will deliver an ad-
dress in the high school auditorium,
Tuesday evening, Jan. 9, at 8 o'clock
He will discuss some of the natural-
ization problems that confront the im-
migrant seeking citizenship in this
country.
Regent Junius E. Beal will also give
a short address of welcome to the
foreign born residents of Ann Arbor
who have signified their intentions of
becoming American citizens.
The address, "Naturalization Pro-
blems," given by Mr. Sturges aroused
great interest at the meeting of the
school teachers of the state of Illinois
at Bloomington. Mr. Sturges will ad-
dress several meetings in Detroit on
Saturday and Monday. The meeting
in Ann Arbor is largely in the inter-
ests of the establishment of a night
school for the benefit of recent citizens
and those intending to attain to citizen-
ship.
GEORGE E. LEWIS TO SPEA
BEFORE BRANCH OF A. I. E. E.
Mr. George E. Lewis, superintend-
ent of the hydraulic power plants of
the Detroit Edison company, will speak
before the regular monthly meeting of
the student branch of the A. I. E.. E.
at 7:30 o'clock Wednesday evening,
Jan. 10. The meeting will be held in
room 348, Engineering building.
The subject of Mr. Lewis' address
will be "Tle Development and Opera-

tbons of Water Power Plants on thel
Huron River."

TO- POUR CONCRETE FOR
NEW UNION APRIL FIRST
Steam Pipes Laid to Thaw Out Ground
Preparatory to Further
Excavation
"We expect to start pouring concrete
for the foundation of the new Michigan
Union Monday and to complete the
foundation by April 1 of this year,"
stated George M. Ames, '85, of the
Hauser, Owens & Ames Co., yester-
day.
Everything is in readiness to begin
work tomorrow. Repairs have been
made for the derrick which was brok-
en last week. The derrick is 70 feet
high, is supported by six cables, and
is capable of excavating several tons
of earth a minute. Steam pipes have
been laid to thaw out the ground at
the west end of the basement where
the big hole must be made eight feet
deeper.
Workmen are engaged in digging
foundation trenches and in sinking
abuttment holes at the east end of the
excavation. About 300 tons of granite
boulders have been hauled preparatory
td'beginning the foundation. The com-
pany's office has been completed under
the Union elm, as well as six shanties
for housing tools and materials. A
gravel bin with the capacity of 150
tons and heated by steam pipes will
allow construction to go on in the
coldest weather.
The committee on the foundation
meets today to decide whether the
gravel on the grounds will be suitable
to use in the concrete. More than 3,000
barrels of Portland cement will be
used.
LEVIN TO ADDRESS MENORAH
Speaker is Professor of Torts in Un-
iversity of Detroit
"The Jewish Renaissance" is the
subject of an address to be delivered
before the Michigan Menorah soci-
ety at 8 o'clock this evening in New-
berry hall by Isadore Levin, a law-i
yer of Detroit, and professor of torts
in the Law school of the University of
Detroit. During his undergraduate'
days at Harvard, Mr. Levin was pres-
ident of the Harvard Menorah society,
vice-president of the Intercollegiate
Menorah association, and president of
the Intercollegiate Zionist association.
An important report concerning the1
Menorah study circles that'are abouts
to be organized will be made at thisi
meeting, and all who are interested in
these study circles are urged to be1
present in order that they may be or-;
ganized as soon as possible.
The election of officers for the sec-
ond semester will be held on Sundayy
evening, Jan. 21. A nominating com-1
mittee, whose business it shall be to
nominate men to run for office, will be
appointed tonight.

I

BERLIN IDEA,1 u. I
SUPPORTS ALL1

.1

Feeling in Telztoz Capital Result o
Senate Support of Wilson
Peace Plan
Ih ISiER STATES ALLIES HAVE
lEFUSED RECENT PROPOSALS
6er1a1 Head Declares in Announce
ment to Fighters That War Will
Go on Owing to Entente
By Carl W. Ackerman
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Berlin, Jan. 6.-America is drifting
toward the allies rather than toward
the policy of co-operation with other
neutrals, is the view of certain ele-
mnents in Germany.,
The opinion is based on discussion
evoked in the United States senate
over the resolution for endorsement of
president's peace note introduced by
Senator Hitchcock. In certain quar
ters, at least, it is held that a debate
as to the possibility of America chang
ing her international policy and enter
ing into a foreign alliance may in
dicate such a tendency.
Kaiser William's proclamation to the
German army and navy today echoed
the press and public's belief that the
allies' reply to Germany is a refusal
The proclamation was as follows:
"To My Army and Navy:
"Together with my allied rulers I had
proposed to our enemies to enter peace
negotiations. Our enemies refused my
proposal. Their hunger for power
wants Germany's destruction. The war
will continue. Before God and hu
manity it is the hostile government:
exclusively that will incur the heavy
responsibility for all further terrible
sacrifices which my will would havE
spared you.
"Justly independent of our enemies
resumption of the war, therefore, and
animated by the will to defend our
holiest good, and to secure a happier
future to the country, you will become
like steel. Our enemies did not ac
cept the understanding proffered by
me.' Now with God's help our arms
will force them to it.
(Signed) "WILHELM,
"Great Headquarters, Jan. 5."

rn

CHARLES MORGAN, JR., OF PHILADELPHIA,
Who Returns to Direct the 1917 Michigan Union Opera.

Charles Morgan, Jr., of Philadelphia, will arrive in'Ann Arbor early
Monday morning to start active work on the 1917 Michigan Union opera.
Mr. Morgan will remain in this city indefinitely, going from here to Phila-
delphia, where he is directing rehearsals for the Mask and Wig club of
the University of Pennsylvania. Immediately after examinations he will
return to Ann Arbor and remain here until the annual show is put on at
the Whitney theater.

SENIOR PICTURES MUST
0E IN BY FEBRUARY 1
Other Work on 1917 Year Book May
Be Delayed Unless Fourth Year
Men Hurry Photos
Seniors in the University may suffer
the disappointment of not finding their
photographs on the pages of the 1917
Michiganensian among those of their
classmates unless they arrange at once
for the taking of these pictures. Feb.
1 is the final date set for the accept-
ance of the photographs, and it is
hoped by the management of the year
book that every senior will feel it his
duty to look after the matter of turn-
ing in his photograph before this date,
as much of the success of the senior
book depends upon the. number of
senior pictures it contains.
The matter of getting the photo-
graphs in has given more trouble this
year than last, and it is especially trou-
blesome owing to the fact that all other
factors in the production of the book
point toward an early publication. The
(Continued on Page Six.)

STANDARDS ARRIVE FOR
MAUSTERINGCEREMONIES
More Whan 30 Men Sign Up for Naval
Reserves During Campaign
of Last Few Days
Two United States standards and a
Union Jack, each six feet by eight
feet, have been received from Detroit
by the University naval reserves to be
formally raised at the mustering next
Wednesday night. The standards are
bordered with heavy gold bullion
fringe and are supported by nine-foot
jointed maple staves, each bearing a
nine-inch spread-eagle and a three-
yard gold bullion cord with tassels.
The name of each division appears in
cloth of gold on the third red stripe
from the bottom of its standard. The
standards will be borne by the bat-
talion on parade while the Union Jack
is to float from some point on the cam-
pus on the days on which the divisions
are under arms.
Recruits for the organization are
coming in fast, over 30 men having
signified their desire to become mem-
bers during the past two days. Phy-
sicial examinations are being held
every night at 7:15 o'clock at the Uni-
versity health service and a recruiting
office is being maintailed at the same
place.
Uniforms for the battalion have not
yet arrived, but the following con-
formity of dress has been ordered for
th,#"iremony Wednesday night: Dark
trousers,' white shirts with sleeves
rolled to elbow, stiff white collars, and
black bow ties.
Faculty members wishing tickets for
the mustering may obtain them from
the deans of their departments while
members of the organization may re-
ceive them from K. W. Heinrich, '17E.

PLAN

FIRST SKATE CARNIVAL

Presbyterian Church
10:30 A. M. Service in the Auditorium of High School.
Leonard A. Barrett Speaks-"PEACE--WAR"
6:30 P. M. Young People's service, McMillan Hall
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Women's League to Hold Affair at
Weinberg's Coliseum
The first skating carnival was plan-
ned. at a meeting of the athletic com-
mittee of the Woman's league yester-
day afternoon. It will be held at
Weinberg's coliseum next week, the
definite date to be announced later.
Some headliner attractions are
promised for . the event, including
races and an interclass game of ice-
hockey. It is also rumored that there
will be an exhibition of fancy skat-
ing.
Tickets will be out by the middle
of this week and the committee is am-
bitious to raise the sale above the
thousand mark, and thus surpass the
record attendance of last year's carni-
val.
Olga Shinkman, '17, is chairman of
the committee which is undertakinig
the affair.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB TO MEET
TO DISCUSS "MAGIC CARPET"
Members of the Cosmopolitan club
will hold a general get-together Mon-
day night in Newberry hall at 7:30
o'clock to discuss the "Magic Carpet,"
the club's play, which will be pro-
duced in Hill auditorium Jan. 12.
The meeting is open to all the club
members and all are asked to attend,
as several important matters will be
discussed at the meeting.
German Submarines Safely in Port
Berlin, Jan. 6.-The German subma-
rine U-46, reported sunk, has returned
to her home port.

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WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE

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LYNN H. HOUGH
Professor in the Garrett Biblical Institute and one of America's
Leading Religious Thinkers
SUBJECT:
THE DYNAMIC OF RELIGION

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Charles Weber, '14, to Talk Tonight
Charles Weber, '14, who has been,
spending the past two years at the
Boston Theological Seminary, is home
for a short time on a vacation. He

TONIGHT
7:30

METHODIST CHURCH

TONIGHT
7:30

1 will speak before
umu
. of the Methodist
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the Epworth League
church this evening

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A PLAY OF WONDERS

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THE
Hill Auditorium

AGIC

CARPET

TICKETS ON SALE TOMORROW

Friday, January 12

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