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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 06, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-01-06

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_ tom) i

1-4 Off Sale

ALL OVERCOATS REDUCED 25 PER CENT FROM
ORIGINAL PRICE
$20.00 Coats now.................... .
21.50 Coats now....................16.)0
27.00 Coats now................. ..2.2
Now is your opportunity to secure one of the newest
models of Overcoats at a great reduction.
Our full line of Bath Robes is also included in this reduc-
tion sale.
TINKER 1& COMPANY
Cor. State and William Sts.

w


'fir. skits-lW..s ta.. Ir:-

Full Dress

Suits, Tuxedo Coats, in
latest styles
Also Silk and Opera Hats

the very

COPYRIGHT, 1416.
Z... ADIAERBROS. & CM~

Do ihis
"Provide
yourself w
a smile and
air of prospi
ity. Wear
your best h1
ness suit an
a cheerful
necktie. If
you have no
best suit-Ab
one. We ha
to appear pr
sperous, if
are to be pr
sperous."

LINDENSCHMITT, APFEL & Co.

Cosmopolitan Club Explained in
Article Dealing with Foreigners

r.

t

The Eberbach & Son Co.

Good Drugs-Toilet Articles
Chemicals and Laboratory Supplies.
You know the Quality is Right.

The Eberbach & Son Co.
200-204 E. Liberty St.

One of Our Dinners)

_-IF" w , , Fl, I - "r--M I lnrf-, r i%,Avjllmlmmmm

Served from 11 to 1
Regular Oinner 35e consists choice of
meats; mashed or boiled potatoes; one
vegetable; choice of pie or pudding; tea,
coffee, or milk.
SPECIALS, as served
Soup .io with meat order .o5
Roast or Fricassee of chicken .25
Roast Prime Ribs of Beef .25
Roast Leg of Veal with Dressing .25
Pork Sausage with Sweet Potatoes .25
Pork Chops Breaded. Extra Special .25
Small Steak with Onions. Ex. Spec'l .25
Bread and Mashed Potatoes included
with above meat orders.
Side Orders Extra
Potatoes mashed .05 Stewed tomatoes .o5
Potatoes boiled .05 Stewed corn .05
Potatoes fried .05 Stewed peas .05
Potatoes german fried .05

In your striving after the
highest oflife's ideals, do not
overlook details.
We are consistently striving
with you to perfect one of
these important details-
your dress.
MAR QUARD Ii
C wIIPUS T'IOR
516 I . Williams St.

Dr. N. S. Hardikar tells of the cus- Exactly the same thing has hap-
tomnary relations of foreigners and the pened in this city and queer questions
people of the land to which they have have been asked by both Americans
immigrated. In his article, which fol- and foreigners about different sub-
lows, he explains the purpose of the Sects. I was once asked by a woman
Cosmopolitan club and shows how it attending the University the name of
should aid a better understanding the Hindu founder of the Hindustan
among all students. The series of for- religion, saying that he was murdered
eign articles written by members of in 1911.
the club appearing in The Daily show Hinduism was not founded by one
the customs and habits of the people man and it is not a religion of the
in foreign countries. twentieth century. There is no re-
ligion so old as that of the Hindus'.
The west speaks of the Orient as Of the 33 nationalities represented,
being populated by heathen, barbarians very few students I believe know
and uncivilized people, and the east where Porto Rico or Honduras is.
believes that the Occident is inhabited Many do not know where the rivers
by mean, treacherous and inhuman be- Mississippi, Amazon or Nile flow. Of
ings. All foreigners whose customs course, it is a matter of mere educa-
are different from those of one's own tion, but I feel that every student on
land are supposed to be uncouth. Folks the campus ought to have at least a
believe that people beyond their own faint knowledge of the world.
boundary have neither reasoning Club Overcomes Ignorance.
power nor the common sense to grasp And this can be easily done by com-
the deeds of men such as themselves. ing in contact with the different stu-
Should an American or European en- dents and mixing with them freely.
ter the home of an Oriental in the east Ignorance could be driven out by edu-
it is likely that he would be despised cating one's self. Organizations like the
and asked to occupy the veranda at Cosmopolitan club, where almost all
once, as the people believe that the nationalities gather to discuss various
stranger will destroy the purity of problems, serve the purpose.
their house. And in America or Eu- We would like everyone to increase
rope an Oriental is very seldom al- the membership of the club by enlist-
lowed to enter the higher society for ing and thereby benefit from the as-
fear that society will be poluted by sociation. Let the foreigners shakeg
the very presence of a heathen. hands with the natives of this country p
False Rresumptions Made. and open their hearts to them; let V
When men go to Central Africa and Americans welcome the outsiders
try to mix with the people there, they whole-heartedly. t
are shunned because they have differ- The articles appearing in The Daily
ent manners and customs. Everyone have aroused considerable interest. d
thinks in his own light and accuses Both foreigners and Americans have '
others. We cannot blame anyone, but expressed favorable comment on them.
both parties do wrong to presume this Articles have been published on Japan, J
way; both are ignorant of each other, South Africa, Germany, Canada, and
and hence, commit a blunder in such China. The remaining stories of the
presumptions. foreign series will appear soon.

REULE,
CONLIN,
FIEGEL
COMPANY
200-202 'MAINS

Sippeirs or IDancing
FOR. MEN
Pumps in patent and dull leather also popular
dancing Oxfords
FOR WOMEN
Party slippers in all colors of satin. Dull, ort Patent
leather and also Gold and Silver cloth pumps
Buy Corrify Slippers for Xmas
WAHRWn Sh.e Store.
VTA~ JMMaIn~ St. State St.

Come In

Home made pies per cut .o5
tard .oS,with cream so.
Coffee .05 Tea .o5
Milk per bottle .o5
S TATE WJT
TREET LUN'
Open All ight .I A. QUAC

Rice cus-

Chocolate .50
Cocoa .Io
CH
KENBUSH, Mgr.

C(OLLECTION OF CATALOGULES
S8dOWS GIIOWTII OF 31 C11IGAN
Course of Studies Scattered Throigh
1f.ige PanlidhoIt Instead of
600-Pare Book

ENGINEERS ISSUE Aii I
DIRECTORY A. I20) STORY
The Engineering department is get-
ting out a register of its alumni which
will be off the press about the first of
April. It will contain the name, ad-
dress and present occupation of each
alumnus of the college. According to
a recent ruling of the board of regents
a larger register will be published in
1920 and every five years thereafter.
This will contain a short professional
history of each graduate and form-
er student of the university, telling
of all the positions he has held since
graduation, and also mentioning any
professional honors that may have
come to him in this time.
W. Stephens, '70, Writes Monographs
Walter B. Stephens, '70, A.M. '73. is
the author of two monographs, "Lin-
coln and Missouri" and "Grant in St.
Louis." The first of these books is
published by the State Historical so-
ciety of Missouri, and the second one
by the Franklin club of St. Louis.

Old University catalogues which
have recently come to light, with their
entire program of studies scattered
through a 16-page pamphlet, show a
marked contrast to the volume of to-
day, which requires 600-pages to cover
the same information given in the
earlier book. The course of study of-
fered to the 72 students who attended
the University in 1843 seems more ap-
propriate to a medieval school than
to a modern university. The first
term of the freshman year, for in-
stance, requires the study of Folsom's
Livy, Xenophones' Cyropaedia, and
Blourdon's Algebra.
In 1852 the catalogue itself came
out under the title of "Latin Catalogus
Senatus Academici," with even the
names of the faculty and students Lat-
ini7ed whenever possible. A collec-
tion of these catalogues from 1847 is
now in the possession of Francis M.
Sessions, '88, and they contain inter-
esting accounts of the growth and
progress of the University.
Polish your floors with Old English
Floor Wax. C. ~i.. Major & Co., Phone"

YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETY
PLANS JANUARY MEETINGS
Miss Saunders, chairman of the pro-
gram committee of the Young Peo-
ple's society of the Unitarian church,
which meets at 6:30 o'clock every
Sunday evening, announced yesterday
the program of the speakers for the
neetings this month.:
Prof. W. D. Henderson of the physics
[epartment will speak at the meeting
next Sunday evening. Morriss Fruit
will talk on "Mental Enslavement,"
Jan. 14. Miss Gwendolyn Watkins
will also give a reading at this time.
Leslie M. Lisle, '17L, will present
reading from James Whitcomb Riley
n Jan. 22. Cecil A. Ross, '18, will give
vocal solo the same evening. Wen-
ell F.bCrockett, '17L, has been se-
Hured by the committee to talk on
Hawaii" for Jan. 28.

Ti z'form Clothzes
-
-U

1:XHIBI1T AUTO HIGHWAY MAPS
,adioi-al Association outlines Over
300,000 Miles of Roads
Has your dad an automobile? If so,
you should stop at the Library some
time during the next two weeks and
see over 300,000 miles of road mapped
by the National Highways association
and 100,000 miles more proposed by
the "better roads" movement.
There are roads from Cheboygan to
Miami, from New York to Seattle and
from Wilmington to San Diego. A
transcontinental road from New York
to San Francisco is one of the pro-
posals. A special feature is that all
maps arranged by the association have
clearly marked every village and ham-
let through which the tourist would
pass. This is especially useful in that
any temporary detour is a simple mat-
ter for the main course is plainly in-
dicated.
Iowa Passes Coal Shortage Crisis
Iowa City, Iowa, Jan. 5.-It was
feared at the University of Iowa that
a coal shortage would cause the Un-
iversity to close down for a time, but
relief was obtained by the accumla-'
tion of fuel made during the holidays.
and authorities announce that the,
crisis is past and fuel is now coming
in sufficient quantities to satisfy all
needs.-

LAW REVIEW FOR JANUARY
WILL GO ON SALE MONDAY
Unless unexpected delays occur, the
January number of the Michigan Law
Review will be ready for distribution
next Monday. Besides the usual "Notes
and Comments" and "Recent Impor-
tant Decisions," this issue will contain
an article entitled "The Changing
Legal Order," by Prof. Floyd R.
Mechem, a former professor of law in
the Michigan Law school. Professor
Mechem has been teaching in the Chi-
cago law school since he left Ann Ar-
bor in 1903.
There will also be an article on
"Public Utility Valuation," by Prof.
Edwin C. Goddard, professor of law
and secretary of the Law school, and
another on "Duress by Legal Proceed-
ings," by Prof. Edgar N. Durfee, of
the Law school.
Col. Pack Brings Back Navajo Rugs
Col. A. C. Pack of Ann Arbor has+
consigned to the Randall and Pack
studio, 212 Washington street, a choice
collection of genuine Navajo rugs and
blankets which he took great pains to
pick out while on duty in Mexico and
on the Mexican border this summer.
Mr. Pack made a tudy of these blank-
ets with the aid of Chaplain Axton of
the 20th U. S. infantry, who is a rec-
ognized expert on this subject. Thesef
will be sold at a low margin of profit
and present a splendid opportunity for

a
o
a
di
cl
"t

Leave Copyl Copy
at t
Quarry's and LAsIdentFI
The Deltax Supply sure
ADVERTISING -

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Florida Land-A hand-
some 11 acre farm, all cleared and
fenced, will sell at a big sacrifice.
As good productive soil as you will
find in the state, especially adapted
to raise fruit and vegetables of all,
kinds, high, dry and healthy loca-
tion, no swamps or malaria; good
house, two barns, poultry houses,
farraing implements; everything
ready to start work. One and one-
half miles from center of the city of
Ocala; good schools and churches;
excellent drinking water. Good rea-
son for selling. Title A-No. 1. Terms
to suit. Mrs. A. M. Winzel, 117 E.
Forsyth St., Jacksonville, Fla. 6-7-9
LOST.
LOST-A leather watch fob and gold
charm, either on State Street or on
the campus. Finder please leave at
825 E. University Ave., and receive
reward. 5-6

WANTED
WANTED-Five men with some sell-
ing; exlperience. Thlree to six hours
spare time. Talk it over with me,
Mr. Negley, 306 S. Main St., up
stairs. 6
WANTED - Industrious man, not
afraid of work, with good references
wishes a job as porter in a fratern-
ity. Call 1873-W. - 5-6-7
WANTED-If you are in need of any-
thing, The Michigan Daily's Classi-
fied Department can help you get
it.
3IISCELLANE OUS
1'_ T TYPEWRITERS of all makes
bought, sold, rented or ex-
changed. Expert repairing,
factory service. Sole agent Under-
wood & Corona. TYPEWRITING,
MIMEOGRAPHING & SUPPLIES.
0. 1.. MORRILL, 32 S. State St.
(Over Baltimore Lunch). 582-J.

FIND NEW SMALLPOX CASE;
OFFICER URGES PRECAUTION
Another case of smallpox has been
found in the city. Mrs. I. Wagner, 716
Church street, is the latest one to
come down with the disease. The house
was quarantined yesterday afternoon.
Dr. John A. Wessinger, local health
officer, has sent out a warning for
everyone in the city to be vaccinated.
Kansas Conducts Merchant Courses
Lawrence, Kan., Jan. 5.-Feb. 5 to
9 will be the time at which the fourth
merchants short course will be held
at the University of Kansas. It is
conducted by the university extension
division for the benefit of retailers
and professional men in many fields
and consists in a series of lectures
cn topics of interest to men in busi-
ness life.
Ohio State Building Damaged by Fire
Columbus, Ohio, Jan. 5.-An unex-
plained fire in one of the Ohio State
University's recitation halls Tuesday
morning, caused about $2,000 damage.
The fire started in the basement, and
before its discovery had gained
enough headway to cause a good deal
of difficulty in extinguishing it.
Chess and Checker Fans Meet Tonight
A meeting of the Chess club will be
held tonight at 7 o'clock in the club
room in the Natural Science building.
All members are urged to come and
receive their tournament standings.
Students in'terested in checkers are in-
vited to attend and show what they
can do.
B. F. Browne Appointed Deputy Officer,
Governor Albert E. Sleeper has ap-
pointed B. F. Browne of this city dep-
uty dairy and food commissioner of
the state. Mr. Browne accepted the
offiee.

*1
!~7TFOR
Mfli UG?

1 -3 Off

On Suits and O'Coats

ALL NEW STOCK

Now is the time to get that Ukulele
you've been wanting; at a discount.

,.
..... ..,_ _ i

Allmendinger Music
Liberty St.
1.

Shop, 122 E. i the purchaser to obtain one more for
6 his collection.

-- .
"""""

I

A Victor Record Dance Hit
NO. 35593

TOM CORBET

Medley

Waltz

116 E. Liberty Street

I-

I'm A-Lonigln' r09 You!l
Ontly a. Yoaz- Ad.

G innellBros.o. im s. Main St.
PHONE 1707

Flannel Shirts made to order. G. H.
Wild Company. Leading merchani
tailors. State street. tf
0. G. ,Andres for shoe repairing. E2!
S. State. 'Phone 17184. toes-401

1,

I- '1.

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