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December 19, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-19

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DAY AND NIGHT SERVICI
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER
ANN ARBOR

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VOL. XXVII. No. 67. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1916. PRICE FIVE CE

COMMITEES OF
UNION P FOR
187 ANNOUNED
A. A. SCHUPP, '17E, GENERAL
CHAIRMAN, GIVES NAMES
OF ASSISTANTS
OTHERS MAY BE CHOSEN LATER
Positions Given to Men Who Have
Worked Faithfully on Prerl.
ous Productions
Committee appointments for the 1917
Union opera were aniounced yester-
day by Arthur Schupp, '17E, general
chairman. The positions have been
given to those who have worked faith-
fully on previous productions. Ad-
ditional appointments may be made
later on.
The appointments are as follows:
Master of properties. John W. Neu-
mann, '17E; master of costumes,
Thatcher Rea, '17E; stage manager,
Gordon Smith, '17E; chairman music
publishing committee, E. B. Palmer,
'17; chairman publicity committee,
John W. Langs, '17; electrician, R. B.
Gardner, '17E; assistant to treasurer,
D. A. Smith, '17E; assistant to general
chairman, Chas. Fischer, '18, J. D.
Hibbard, '18E, A. V. Livingston, '18E;
costume committee, Harold Collins,
'18E, Carl Neumann, '18, F. J. Thieme,
'18E; property committee, W. S. Din-
widdie, '18E, R. B. Gotfredson, '18, A.
G. Ippel, 18; assistant stage managers,
A. G. Gabriel, '18, David W. Shand, '18;
music publishing committee, Paul
Cholette, '19, Sherwald Sedgwick, '19;
publicity committee, Cecil Andrews,
'18, Richey Reavill, '19, George Ohrs-
trom, '19L; stage committee, F. C..
Bell. '19, John Chase, '19, T. S. Cox,
'17, E. G. Dudley, '18E, R. E. Gault, '19.
Ri. S. Daugherty, '19, M. F. Smallpage,
'18, H. E. Storz, '19; finance commit-
tee, J. L. Bateman, '19E, H. L. Caul-
kins, '19, Brodhead Howard, '19, J. M.
Pierce, '19, 3. F. Hunter, '19, Philip
Bash, '19, Henry G. Hoch, B. R. Dooge,
'19, J. I. McClintock, '19.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE PLAN PARTY
Entertainments to Be Given for Girls
That Remain in City
A number of parties have been ar-
ranged by the Women's league for the
girls who are to remain in Ann Arbor
over the holidays and the first of these
has been set for Friday afternoon of
this week in Barbour gymnasium.
The festivities, consisting of danc-
ing, cards, and certain mysterious
"games," are to begin at 3 o'clock and
continue until .6 o'clock. Margaret
Reynolds, '17, president of the league,
is managing the affair and will open
her home for one of them Thursday,
Dec. 28.
There will be other/ parties in the
vacation which will be .announced
later.
JUNIOR LAWS SELECT J-HOP
REPRESENTATIVES AT MEETING
At a meeting of the junior law class
yesterday afternoon Clarence Klinger
and Lester A. Meeks were appointed
to represent the laws on the J-hop
committee.
The following men were appointed
to act as a social committee for the
year: W. C. Allie, chairman; G. F.

Hurley, J. W. Thomas, and W. H.
Hodges. Plans were discussed for a
junior law post mortem smoker to be
held at the Union after the final exam-
inations at the end of this semester.
Glee Club Personnel Not Yet Decided
According to a statement made by
Maurice Nicholls, '17E, manager of
the combined Glee and Mandolin clubs,
early this morning, the clubs will leave
for their western trip at 9:06 o'clock
Thursday morning. The personnel of
the organization has not been defl-
nitely decided yet, but will be an-
nounced tomorrow.
Michigan Dropped by Syracuse, Report
An unconfirmed report was re-
ceived from the Detroit papers early
this morning that Syracuse had
dropped the University of Michigan
from its football schedule and had
submitted a game with the Michigan
Agricultural college in its. place.

Housewives Not
Against Dealers
Merchants Already Beginning to Feel
Effect of Boycott
"The Housewives' league has noth-
ing personal against the grocers of
Ann Arbor, and I believe that they
misunderstand the movement set on
foot," was the response of Miss D. S.
Fogg. secretary of the league, in an-
swer to the proposed idifference of
local dealers as regads the boycott
plans.
"The feeling that seems to predom-
inate among local grocers and meat
dealers, according to statements given
out by them, indicates that they re-
gard the boycott plan as 'unfair' and
state that it will have no effect upon
the articles attacked. Another argu-
ment is that they can sell all the but-
ter and eggs they can get hold of at
the price they must ask."
Miss Fogg also stated, when asked
what she thought of the attitude taken
by the dealers, that the Housewives'
league was merely joining the na-
tional movement, and that in order to
do so must .become a local movement.
"We have no grievance against the
dealers and think that if they under-
stand the movement they will co-op-
erate with us." She also stated that
one of the leading grocers said he
would gladly co-operate with the
league as soon as he could reduce his
stock.
One of the members of the exe-
cutive committee of the Housewives'
league stated last night that many of
the merchaits were already beginning
to feel the effect of the boycott. She
also stated that Ann Arbor dealers
were given a chance before the boy-
cott was declared to help in fighting
the high cost of living in this city, and
although they offered their co-onera-
tion, they di not suggest definite
plans to help along the movement.
BARON STILL HELD CAPTIVE
Oppenheim Mystery Partly Cleared;
Banker Kept at Ellis Island
New York, Dec. 18.-Mystery sur-
rounding the deportation of Baron R.
Robert Emmanuel Oppenheim, British
and French banker, was partially
cleared this afternoon when he was
ordered deported on being "moral
turpitude."
The nature of the crime with which
Oppenheim was charged was not dis-
closed by the immigration authorities.
Baron Oppenheim has made announce-
ment that he will appeal to the im-
migration authorities at Washington.
He will be held at Ellis Island until
this can be acted upon.
FRESH LITS TO HOLD SMOKER
Dean Effinger and Dr. Scott Address
Yearlings Tonight
Dean John R. Effinger and Dr.
Jonathon F. Scott will speak at the
freshman literary smoker to be held
at 7:30 o'clock tonight in the Michi-
gan Union. Anyone who can play is
urged to bring his instrument, as mu-
sic will be furnished by members of
the class.
Those serving on the committee are:
R. G. Yerkes, '20, chairman;- Roger
Manwaring, '20, and John Andrews,
'20. Plenty of tobacco, cider, and eats
will be on hand. An admission of 25
cents will be charged.

SOPHOMORE ENGINEERS GIVE
CHRISTMAS PARTY IN GYM
Barbour gymnasium was the scene
of the soph engineer Christmas party
last Saturday night. Although there
were no colored lights or decorations
the hundred couples that attended
were made to feel that Christmas was
here.
The music was furnished by Shook's
J-hop orchestra of Detroit. The party
was chaperoned by Mr. 0. W. Boston
and Mrs. Boston, and Mrs. J. R. Allen.
Adelphi to Hold Preliminary Try Out
Sixteen members of the Adelphi
house of representatives will meet at
7:30 o'clock tonight in the Adelphi
rooms to compete for places in the
preliminary try outs for the mid-west
debating team. Of the 16, six will be
chosen to represent the society in the
tryouts for the Varsity debating team.

WOODPLEDSFOR
TRAINING SSTEM
Recommends Proposed Military Train.
ing Bill; Should BegineIn.
struction at 19
SUGGESTS SIX MONTHS' DRILLING
Washington, Dec. 18. -"Nothing
could be more lamented than the com-
plete failure of the mobilization plan
along the border," declared Major-
General Leonard Wood, former chief
of staff, before the sub-committee on
military affairs today. "Not one-half
of the regulars or militia units on the
border today are at war strength,"
said Wood. "We have no defense, we
are unprepared; the only way is to
get it by the universal training sys-
tem. We must get it now and get it
quickly."
Wood outlined very briefly the plan
by which he said 4,000,000 trained men
would be available in a few years. "In
addition to our regular forces we must
have additional forces," Wood said.
"The proposed universal military ta-
ing bill will ultimately make a sys-
tem. We would not wait any length
of time to develop our citizen forces.
In addition to the plan now proposed
we should begin to train the youth at
19 years of age. Six months' intensive
training in camps is sufficient to give
us well trained private soldiers. I
make this statement after being at
several summer training camps. Non-
commissioned officers would require
more training.
Would Soon Have Army of 4,000,000.
"About 1,030,000 youths reach the
age of 19 annually, about one-half of
these are physically fit for military
training. In addition to the six months'
intensive training, on reaching the age
of 21, be recalled for one month pre-
liminary training in the field. I would
not accept married men. At the age
of 29 we would have available an army
of 4,000,000 trained men. At the end
of six months' intensive training they
will weigh up well with the regular
army and would be as well as one-half
of the regular army. The six months'
intensive training is equivalent to
about 18 months' regular training.
About one-half of the time of the regu-
lars is taken up with other duties,
There should be no pay for such serv-
ice.
Shows Character of Border Militia.
"It is a part of a man's duty to the
nation," said Wood, "and figures show
that the names of 47,757 men out of
90,000 on the rolls of the militia or-
ganizations called to do border serv-
ice disappeared during transition from
state to federal service. Of this num-
ber 23,721 were disqualified for phy-
sical reasons and 7,258 failed to re-
spond to the call. The number of men.
subject to call without prior experi-
ence and with less than three months'
military training was 81,263 enlisted,
or 63 per-cent of the total number, the
37 per cent represented a partially
trained organization. Of the total 90,-
817, it was found that only 21 per
cent were rated first-class marksmen,
16 per cent werecrated in different
shots and 63 per cent were rated as
entirely untrained."
UNION TO HOLD SATURDAY
NIGHT DANCES IN VACATION
During Christmas vacation the
Michigan Union will hold its regular
Saturday night dances. The Union
is scheduled for more than 50 dinners

and lunches after vacation, a number
of smokers, and more than 30 dances.
N. C. Fetter Spends Vacation in Penn
N. C. Fetter, general secretary of
the University Y. M. C. A., has gone to
Pennsylvania where he will remain.
till Jan. 4. After his return to Ann
Arbor he will attend a church work-
ers' convention in Chicago during the
month of January.
C. W. Miller Operated on Yesterday
Cecil W. Miller, '19, was taken sud-
denly ill Sunday afternoon and was
removed to the Homeopathic hospital
where he was operated on for acute
appendicitus yesterday. Last night he
was reported to be regaining rapidly.
Fresh Laws to Meet After Vacation
A meeting of the freshman law class
will be held at 4 o'clock Friday,, Jan.
5, 1917. All members of the class are
urged to be present.

Estimate Losses of Armies
Berlin, Dec. 18.-The total French losses since the beginning of
the war have been 3,800,000, and the British losses 1,300,000, ac-
cording to "the most reliable data," says the official News Service
agency today.
The French losses on the Somme up to the end of November the
press estimates to be at least 250,000, the statement declared. The
British loss was 550,000, plus the total loss of 880,000. The German
losses were much lower than 500,000.

"ROUND ROIN'TO
BE INVIESTIGATED
Gen. Geo. Bell, Jr., Charges Men of
Ohio Regiment With Careless-
ness and Inefficiency
PUNISHMENT AWAITS SIGNERS
El Paso, Texas, Dec. 18.-Investiga-
tion has been ordered by Gen. Geo.
Bell, Jr., commanding the 11th divis-
ion here, into the reported signing of
the "Round Robin" by a number of
National guardsmen of the Eighth
Ohio Infantry, charging that neglect
of the conditions of the men was re-
sponsible for the sickness and indi-
rectly causing the death of on of the
men of Company G of that regiment.
In case the signers of the document
are found they will be subject to
punishment.
Colonel Vollreath, commanding the
Eighth Ohio Infantry, reported to Gen.
Bell today the incident of the "Round
Rubin." "I will take action against
the guardsmen for such conduct as the
'Round Robin' incidents," said General
Bell, "because it is absolutely without
foundation. Two regular non-commis-
sioned officers who inspected every-
thing reported conditions good and I
am told by the officers of the Eighth
Ohio of some men who through their
own carelessness and ineffiiency in
Company G became ill."
In military quarters it is known that
discontented groups angered by being
detained on the border are attempting
to foment trouble. Such guardsmen
will be dealt with severely upon dis-
covery of their identity. As a result
the men are loathe to talk and discon-
tent is confined to undercurrents with
occasionally outbreaks.
It was said that the "Round Robin"
was mysteriously employed while in
the mails enroute to Akron, 0. "Any
demonstration is without justifleation
if the cause be assigned as due to
shortage of sanitary conditions," said
Gen. C. Steaks, commanding the Ohio
troops. "The health report list is
ample proof of the conditions."
Ohio Senator -to Demand Investigation
Washington, Dec. 18.-Senator Hard-
ing, Ohio, will demand an investiga-
tion of coalitions along the border if
the official reports bear out the press
despatches of conditions said to ex-
ist in the Eighth Ohio regiment as an-
nounced by the United Press this aft-
ernoon.
The war department said this at-
ernoon that the question of discontent
against the rations among the border
militiamen would naturally be handled
by General Funston himself unless
conditions went to actual mutiny. The
department had heard nothing -of the
Eighth Ohio incident.
Yale Directory Shows Steady Increase
New Haven, Dec. 18.-The Directory
of Living Yale Graduates, issued this
week, shows a steady increase in the
n, ..m ofj ~, mn fl Jar tak 4nn

SUB-COMMITTEES
PICKEDFOR HOP
Late Start Makes It Necessary to Start
Preliminary Work During
the Holidays
MEN TO MAKE REPORT JAN. 4
At the first real business meeting of
the J-Hop committee which was held
last night at the Union, the following
sub-committees were appointed by E.
C. Schacht, general chairman:
Executive-E. C. Schacht, '18E,
chairman; C. L. Klinger. '18L, secre-
tary; G. A. Reem, '18, treasurer; L. A.
Meeks, '18L.
Decorations-J. D. Hibbard, '18E,
chairman; W. M. McKee, '18E, L. A.
Meeks, '18L.
Music and features-H. B. McCal-
lum, '18, chairman; F. W. Prover, '18.
Booth--}E. G. Dudley, '18E, chair-
man; P. 0. Davis, '18A.
Programs, invitations, and tickets-
B. W. Malfroid, '18H, chairman; D. L.
Mitchell. '18D, R. H1. Halstead, '18.
Refreshments and pictures-T. S.
Barnett, '18M,tchairman.
Publicity-V. H. Simmons, '18, chair-
man.
Taxies and arrangements-H. B.
McWilliams, '18P, chairman.
E. E. Mack, chairman of last year's
hop, spoke at the meeting last night
and gave some valuable suggestions.
The different committeemen are plan-
ning to put in some time during the
Christmas vacation, owing to the late
start this year. All of these commit-
tees will report on their investigations
at the next business meeting, which
will be held on the evening of Jan.
4, 1917.

MUSIC, EATS, N
CIDER AT SMOKER!:T I TE N6 ,
GOODFELLOWS TO HAVE TWENT
CHILDREN AS GUESTS
AT UNION
TO BE HELD AT 4 O' CLOCI
Big Christmas Tree to be Decorate
to Entertain Small
"Kiddles"
Music, eats, smokes, and cider wil
be some of the features of the big
goodfellow smoker at the Union this
afternoon.
The excitement will begin at 4
o'clock and for the next two hours
there will be entertainment for every-
body, including the 20 "kiddies" wh
will be the guests of honor.
One of the musical attractions wil
be the "Midnight Sons." This quarte
has promised to contribute the bes
harmony on its repertoire and mor
talent of the same order has virtuall
signed up to help make the big even
a success.
Fraternity Gives Christmas Tree
A big Christmas tree has been se-
cured from one of the fraternities and
this will be decorated for the benefi
of the children.
Because of the lack of time befor
the students will leave, the committe
in charge of collecting old clothes and
shoes from the fraternities has aske
the different houses to send all suc
material to the Union tomorrow. Eact
house will send its contribution ad
from here it will be sent to the offlei
.of the Federation of charities.
All independents are urged to brin
anything they have to give when they
come to the smoker. Every kind o
garment can be put to some use. The
need of clothing among the poor s
urgent and every contribution will be
value to someone.
Nearly All Cared For
Every boy on the list furnished by
the Federated charities showing those
who were in immediate need of cloth
ing has been cared for. There are still
a few little girls but they will be cared
for by the money contributions as fai
as possible. Any houses who wish tc
take children for a "feed" or an outfl
of clothes or both, should call Mrs
William D. Henderson this morning, or
Miss Frieda Sigworth at the Delt.
Delta Delta house. While most of the
children in serious need of clothin
have been taken care of there are stil
many who would appreciate a Christ-
mas dinner.
The fraternities who are on the
Goodfellow list at presentaare: Sig-
ma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Nu, Delta
Tau Delta, Phi Delta Theta, Trigon
Phi Gamma Delta, Alpha Sigma Phi
Acacia, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Kap-
pa Psi, Psi Upslon, Sigma Chi, Ph
Sigma Kappa, and Sigma Phi. Th
Monks and two individuals who with-
hold their names are also on the list
The sorority list is as follows: P
Beta Phi, Alpha Chi Omega, Kapp
Kappa Gamma, Alpha Phi, Sorosis, anm
Delta Delta Delta. Newberry resi
dence and the Kappa Alpha Theta
sorority will each provide for tw
children. The Martha Cook dormitory
and the Mu Phi Epsilon sorority ar
each contributing money.
Boxes to be Collected Today
A contribution of $10 from the Mor
tar Board society brings the tota
amount collected from campus socie

ties up Ito $84.65. The boxes placed
around the campus will probably bE
collected sometime today and this aft
ernoon a report which will be as near
ly complete as possible will be prepar
ed by the Goodfellows and submitted
to Mrs. William D. Henderson of th
Federated charities.
The Lutz Clothing company has no
tified the Goodfellows that it will sel
one dozen Mackinaws for $3.00 each
their cost price, to organizations whc
are outfitting children.
Tomorrow morning The Daily wil
publish a resume of the campaigr
showing as far as possible just wha
has been accomplished.
$2,600 Collected on Seals at Yal
New Haven, Dec. 18.-The commit
tee in charge of the sale of Red Cros
seals in New Haven announces tha
$2,600 has been collected to date, an
that efforts are being made to realiz
a total of $5,000 by the time the cam
paign closes.

* * * * * * * * * * *
BE A GOODFELLOW 2
Come to the Smoker This j
ternoon!Z
Society Contributions to
Fund:

* -* *
**
*
Aft- *
*
the *
*
0.25 *

Vulcans
Griffins

...... . .....$1

...............

Mortar Board............
Sphinx ..................
Scalp and Blade........
Adelphi .................
Archons ...............
Cercle Francais..........
Senior Society...........
Commerce club...........
Totem club..............
Prescott club.............
Alchemists ..............
Illinois club..............
State Street Merchant....

10.15
10.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
3.25
1.00

I

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Total...............$84.65
* * ** * * * * * * *

OFFICERS' EXAMINATION FOR
MILITARY CORPS HELD TODAY

manufacturing, finance, mercantile Examinations for permanent officer-
business, and engineering, and an ships of the military training corps
equally steady decrease of those who during the second semester will be
are entering the professions. held in the west medical amphitheater,
at 6:45 o'clock tonight. The examina-
Ohio Club to Hold First Smoker Jan. 11 tion will cover the following subjects:
Members of the Ohio club and their School of the soldier, squad company,
Buckeye friends will hold their first and battalion; leadership; combat; at-
smoker of the school year on Jan. 11, tack; fire superiority; camps; marches
1917, just about a week after the holi- and camp sanitation.
day recess. Plans for numerous All men are eligible who have had
speeches and an assortment of cider at least one year's drill with an or-
and doughnuts are being made by the ganized corps or have attended one
social committee. of the government's camps or have
been members of any state militia.
Prof. W. L. Schurz Finishes Book The drill for tomorrow evening has
Prof. W. L. Schurz of the history been postponed and the next regular
department has just finished a book drill is scheduled for the first Wed-
on the "History of the Pacific." nesday night after vacation.z

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