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December 17, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-17

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iDAY-WA IER AND
PROBABLY SNOW

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[IcH AN

oAL

UNITED PRESS WI
DAY AND NIGHT SERVIC
THE ONLY MORNING PAPERI
ANN ARBOR

l.

VOL. XXVII. No. 66. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1916. PRICE FIVE

VOTE TO BOY.COTT
BUTER AND EGGS'
F OR THREE WEEKS
HOUSEWIVES, BOARDING HOUSE
KEEPERS, AND STUDENTS
TAKE ACTION"
WILL NOT FIGHT MERCHANTS
Grocers Given Till Thursday to Un-
load Stocks, So as Not to
Injure Them
"It is the opinion of this meeting
that the people of Ann Arbor should
refrain from buying butter and eggs
for a period of three weeks, begin-
ning next Thursday." The above reso-
lution was adopted by an overwhelm-
ing vote at an enthusiastic mass meet-
ing of Ann Arbor housewivbs, busi-
ness men, students, and boarding
house proprietors in the high school
auditorium last night. It was only
after a lengthy and somewhat heated
discussion that -the persons present de-
cided that the best way to combat the
high cost .of living in this city is by
the above method.
In order to bring out definitely the
idea that the object of the resolution
was not to fight the local merchants,
it was moved and passed that the mo-
tion should not go into effect until
next Thursday morning so as to give
the merchants time to give warning
to the persons who furnish them with
eommodities.
William K. Niemann Talks.
William K. Niemann, '17, who spoke
on behalf of the stewards of the fra-
ternities, sororities, and clubs on the
campus, stated that although he was
not in normal times in favor of a boy-
[ cott, with such conditions as now pre-
Vail it is the only way to solve the
high living cost question. "We must
not blame the grocers, maybe not the
middle man," continued Niemann,
"but we must go back even farther
than that in some cases. I know of
a case in New York City where one
man has 85 carloads of eggs in storage
- waiting until the time comes when the
price of eggs goes to the maximum. A
united effort of all the people for a
boycott would no doubt force this mer-
chant to unload the eggs at a rea-
sonable price." Mrs. C. V. Kent, rep-
resentative of the Housewives' league
gave the history of the league, stating
the purpose and aim of the house-
wives in the movement here in Ann
Arbor.
Herbst Thinks Boycott Will Do Good.
Mr. H. H. Herbst in an eloquent talk.
said that the people of Ann Arbor are
paying outrageous prices for commodi-
ties' and that it is the duty of, every
Ann Arbor citizen to investigate the
conditions and take some definite stand
in the movement. "If the people of
fAnn Arbor should declare a boycott
and everyone should unite in the move-
ment, I am sure that the price of
foods in this city would drop consid-
erably " stated the real estate man.
Mr. C. C. Freeman, boarding house
proprietor, stated that he is very much
in sympathy with the Housewives'
League and that if the local organiza-
tion joined with the national organiza-
tion in combating the prohibitive
prices, that a boycott would be effec-
tive. He stated, however, that he is
not in favor of a boycott, but that an

appeal should be made to everybody to
refrain from buying butter and eggs.
A vote was then taken on whether
or not the people of Ann Arbor should
refrain from buying butter and eggs,
and the resolution passed by a ma-
jority of about eight to one.
Conrad Church, '17, acted as chair-
man of the meeting.
Fire Destroys Forty-Eight Buildings
Shamokin, Pa., Dec. 16.-Fire which
broke out in the Williams building
Friday night for a time threatened de-
struction of the business section. Two
score business ouses and eight dwell-
ings were destroyed at a loss of $350,-
000. Several spectators were injured
by falling walls. Several fire depart-
ments from nearby towns responded,
but the firemen were handicapped by
frozen water plugs. Sixty families
were driven into the bitter cold, many
in their night clothing.
A defective flue is blamed for the
fir'.

Poetry Boycott
Would Stop This
But Its Author Thinks Our House.
wives' Movement a Good
Thing
Oh, we can buy that house and lot,
and eke that motor car, and other
costly things, I wot, from store and
shop and bar. For we have sworn
ne'er to use the' products of the hen,
and to defeat the shopman's ruse to
raise the price again. Our morning's
egg we will eschew, although it grieves
us 'sore, nor let the barber us sham-
poo, until the prices lower. No longer
need the actor sad his noble form de-
fend. Too precious even are the bad
to waste on such an end. It seems to
us that someone's plot to corner the
supply, well merits quite the boycott,
which you have pledged, and I.
Select Scenario
for Junior Play
Book Written by Jeanette Kiekenfeld,
Chosen for Annual Production
By Third Year Girls
The scenario written by Jeanette
Kiekenfeld, '18, has been chosen for
the annual Junior Girls' play. Its ex-
act nature, in accordance with tra-
dition, is kept a profound secret, but
the committee in charge, which has
dad a number of scenarios under con-
Aideration for some time, stated that
although several were desirable art-
stically, none were so practically pro-
lucible as the one chosen.
Members of the class who wish to
compete in the writing of the music
and. lyrics will meet at 4 o'clock to-
.norrow afternoon in Barbour gymnas-
.um to receive instructions from Prof.
T. R. Brumm of the Rhetoric depart-
nent, who will coach the play. Work
3n the book is nearing completion and
try outs will probably be held soon
after the opening of the second semes-
ter. Clarissa Vyn, '18, is general
;hairman of the play.

VILLISTAS PRESS
CHIHUAHUA DRIVE
Carranzista Army in North of State
Cut Off by Advance of Bandit
Forces
WANTS PACT WITH AMERICANS
El Paso, Texas, Den. 16.-Proceed-
ing swiftly southward, Villa's forces
have occupied Jimimvrez, and are now
in possession of that city as well as
Sampa and Rosalia, the only impor-
tant points between them and Chihua-
-hua, according to the reports from
mining companies tonight. The oc-
cupation by bandit forces effectually
serves the only channel of escape for
General Mugiua's government army in
the north.
It has been reported also that Villa
has sent a courier from his camp 50
miles weA of Minaca in the Guerreo
district of Chihuahua, offering to make
an agreement with the American gov-
ernment to the effect that he would
abstain from destruction of life and
property in Mexico if the American
forces would withdraw into United
States territory.
Villa Has 8,000 Men.
At the camp where Villa had left his
wounded in the Guerrero district, a
number of Carranza wounded also are
being treated by Villa's surgeons,
after they had promised to join the
Villa army. Villa has 8,000 well armed
men and 3,000 rifles in reserve, a
number of artillery pieces with him
and a supply of shells for those pieces.
From sources here known to be
friendly to Villa it was learned that
Villa is anxious to put himself in a
better light with the United States
government, and this was said to ac-
,ount for the fact that no Americans
or other foreigners other than Chinese
and Arabs were killed in Chihuahua
City during the five days Villa was in
control.
MUNSTERBERG DIES SUDDENLY

A n Unexpected JMobilization

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WILL ANN ARBOR HOUSEWIVES' LEAGUE BOYCOTT LEAD TO THIS'

MIMES INITIATE AT UNION Noted harvard Professor Succumbs
Ito Heart Attack, It Is Thought

iew Members of Organization Give
Songs at Luncheon
The sextet from Lucia sung by three
'nitiates was one of the features of
he Mimes' Dansant held at the Michi-
,an Union yesterday from 1 to 5
'clock. The men rendering the sextet
vere Earl Pardee, '17, Gordon Smith,
17E, and John Neumann, '17E. They
vere led by Glenn Coulter, '18L.
Luncheon was served at 1 o'clock
vith dancing between the courses. Let-
ers were passed around with instruc-
:ions for the stunts of each initiate.
after lunch more dances were en-
oyed, when Morrison Wood, '17, took
he. floor and appointed Alan Living-
ton, '18, and Robert Bennett, '18, to
;ive an interpretation of the Argen-
ine tango. Lathvon Berry, '18E, gave
t Spanish dance.
Arthur Hammond, '17D, and Leon-
ird Aldrich, '17E, played a duet on the
:axaphone and cornet, accompanied by
A. .J. Gornetsky, '19L, on the piano.
John Kasberger, '18, gave an ex-
temporaneous talk on how he became
a butler. Walter Atlas, '18, danced the
iighland fling.
The party was chaperoned by Mr.
Earl V. Moore and Mrs. Moore.
POLONIA LITERARY CIRCLE
MEETS IN McMILLAN HALL
Commemorating the anniversary of
the birth of Adam Mickiewicz, Poland's
greatest poet, the Polonia Literary
circle will give a literary program at
McMillan hall at 7 o'clock tonight.
Stanley Bomcki, '17, will speak on
the significance of the poet as a fac-
tor in national life; Joseph Skutecki,
'17E, will talk on Mickiewicz's master-
pieces, and Prof. S. J. Zowski of the
Engineering college, will address the
meeting on the activities of the poet
with reference to the life of the Polish
students in Europe after 1815.
The program will be given in Polish
and all understanding that language
are invited to attend. Refreshments
will be served.
London Stops Manufacture of Hairpins
London, Dec. 16.-The manufacture
of hairpins is to halt because the gov-
ernment needs the metal for bullets
and shells.j

Cambridge, Mass, Dec. 16.-Prof.
Hugo Muensterburg of Harvard uni-
iversity, one of the foremost au-
thorities on psychology in the world,
-lied at his home yesterday morning,
it is thought from heart attack. He
was 53 years old.
He was born at Danzig, Germany,
June 1, 1863, and was a graduate of
Leipsig and Heidelberg universities.
He has received honorary degrees
from a number of universities of this
country.
Professor Muensterburg was the au-
thor of "Psychology and Life," "Psy-
chology and the Teacher," "American
Problems," "Psychology and Industrial
Efficiency," and many other well
known scientific books.
In 1903 he was appointed editor of
the Harvard phychological studies and
held that position up to his death yes-
terday. He was contributer to a num-
ber of scientific journals in both Amer-
ica and Europe, and was also vice-
president of the International Con-
gress of Arts and Sciences.
Junior Laws Hold Meeting Monday
There will be an important meeting
of the junior law class at 4 o'clock
Monday afternoon in room C, of the
Law building.

HOP COMMITTEE MEETS
AT UNION THIS MORNING
Will Formulate Preliminary Plans for
Social Event to Be Held Be-
tween Semesters
At its initial meeting at the Union
at 10:30 o'clock this morning, the
J-hop conmittee will formulate the
preliminary plans for the dance this
school year. Hard work is in store
for the committee, which, owing to
its late election, must hurry up the
many details, great and small, con-
nected with the biggest social event
:f the year.
All the committees must be ap-
pointed and most of the contracts
made before school reopens in Jan-
uary. The committee will be assisted
at the meeting by the men who had
charge of the function last year. Their
experience is expected to be valuable
in suggesting plans.
The following have been elected by
the various junior classes to act on
the committee which meets at the
Union: E. C. Schacht, '18E, general
chairman; Frank Grover, '18, Robert
IHalstead, '18, Victor Simmons, '18, Guy
Reem, '18, Harry McCallum, '18, John
Hibbard, '18E, Waldo McKee, '18E,
Elbridge Dudley, '18E, H. B. McWil-
liams, '18P, B. W. Malfroid, '18H, and
B. O. Davis, '18A.
The laws, dents, and medics will
appoint their representatives tomor-
row.
MICHIGAN ALUMNUS CONTAINS-
REPORT OF GRADUATE SCHOOL
The December number of the Mich-
igan Alumnus has come from the
press. It contains the usual number of
interesting articles and, several ex-
cellent cuts.
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd gives the 1915-1
16 report of the Graduate school, and
the organization of a naval corps at
the University, in connection with the
military training system recently ad-
opted is discussed at length.
A review of the football season just
closed is presented by N. H. Bowen,
'01, and there are reviews of several
new books and magazine articles re-
cently published by Alumni.

GODOFELLOW Sum RAISED j
TO FIFTY DOLLAR MARK
Additional Campus Societies Aid in
Pledging Money for Christ-
mas Work<
Several of the campus societies'
aided in the Goodfellow movement
yesterday, bringing the sum pledged
up to the $50 mark. Several fratern-
ities other than the ones mentioned in1
The Daily, have also signified their in-
tention of taking a boy and fitting him,
out with a complete outfit and giving,
him a big Christmas dinner.
The list of contributors to the
Gooodfellow up to date is as follows:
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
* Vulcans ...............$10.25 *
* Griffins .................. 10.15 * ]
* Sphinx................. 5.00
* Scalp and Blade.........5.00
* Adelphi ............... 5.00 *
* Archons ......... ........ 5.00 * 1
* Cercle Francais .......... 5.00 *1
* Senior Society ...........5.00 *
* Commerce Club ...........5.00 *
* Totem Club .............. 5.00 *
* Prescott Club ... , .. ......5.00
* Alchemists .............. 5.00 *
* Illinois Club............3.25 *
* State Street Merchant ...1.00 *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
DEBATE QUESTION ANNOUNCED
Societies to Argue on Compulsory Mil-
itary Training
Announcement of the question for
the inter-society debates held in the
spring was made yesterday by the
president of the Oratoricalassociation.
The question is, "Resolved, That com-
puLhory military training should be
adopted for all male citizens of the
United States."
The society tryouts will be held
shortly after the opening of the second
semester, and the elimination debates
between the four debating societies.
Jeffersonian, Webster, Alpha Nu, and
Adelphi, will be held in March. The
final debate will be held next May in
University Hall, at which time the two
winning teams in the eliminations will
debate for the alumni cup. ;
The freshman debate between the
freshman members of the Alpha Nu
and Adelphi societies will be on the
same question and the tryouts will be
held shortly before the cup debaters
are chosen.
STUDENTS APPLYING FOR WORK
AT "Y" EMPLOYMENT BUREAU

FRENCH GAIN 12
MILES IN CHARGE
100,000 GERMANS UNABLE
CHECK ATTACK OF
ALLIES
80,000 MEN IN GREAT GNARL
9,000 Prisoners Already Reported;
Counter Attack as Yet
Undertaken
London, Dec. 16.-Whle peace to
is under discussion by the world, I
sound of battle resounds on eve
front, east, west, north, and soi
Seldom has there been such ferocic
fighting, according to reports from
capitals.
By force of might Gemany
deavored to show that the plea f
peace came through strength and r
weakness. The allies returned the;j
jection of peace Ijy hurling forwa
80,000 French troops, piercing G
many's front for 12 miles and secui
much territory by long continued a
vances. One hundred thousand G
mans opposed these onslaughts
vain. It was considered a mas
stroke in all branches of milita
science.
Well Timed Infantry Advance.
So well timed was the advance
infantry, so well directed was the f
Tillery fire, the astonished enemy we
forced back. Nine thousand prison
have already been counted in this f
ward advance over six miles of fra
The first assault was on Vachera
ville, which was raked with shell fl
and immediately afterward Lam
was captured by the French. By sa
oral well directed strokes Chambrej
"arm and the Pesomzaux works we
seized. Up to tonight no counter
tacks by the enemy have been :
ported.
Berlin Reports Artillery Fire
Berlin, Dec. 16.-The allies te
porarily renewed the artillery fire
the Somme sector and infantry attac
on the east front of the Meuse, f
cording to the detailed official repo
Wallachia and the Bohrudja arm
gained ground.
Calm was reported from the.Ma
lonian front.
WILSON DECIDES TO SEND
NOTES TO ENTENTE ALLI

t

Presbyterian C hurch
HURON and DIVISION STS..
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
Christmas Service
Sunday, December 17th, 10;30 a. m.

All That Now Remains Is Translatlo
and Revision of Phrase-
ology
Washington, Dec. 16.-Presider
Wilson's decision to forward the cex
tral powers' peace notes to the enteni
allies without any mediation offer b
the American government, left toda
only the task of trauslatio' and re
vision of phraseology to be finishe
before they are transmitted. TI
president's determination to have ti
United States government act only a
a medium for exchange of -the note
between the hostile belligerents wa
made after a prolonged cabinet mee
ing late Friday.
The notes received from German
Austria, and Turkey were meant to 1
identical, but the translations receive
here differed slightly in wording, ar
an effort was made today to harmoi
ize them. Officials suggested that tl
American representatives in each
the central allies' capitals should 1
requested to transmit the documen
direct to American diplomats in tl
entente countries.
Since the first note arrived, the 0
from Germany, the president and i
closest advisers have been absorb(
in study of the situation. The Au
trian note followed, and the one frc
Turkey came late Friday, too late
be translated for the cabinet meetir
Soph Lits Hold First Mixer of Ye
About 200 sophomores gathered ye
terday afternoon in Barbour gymna
lum for the first 1919 lit mixer of t
year. Dancing began at 3 and last
until 6 o'clock. Music was furnish
by "Ike" Fisher's orchestra.
Dean John R. Effinger and Mrs. I
finger and 'Registrar A. G. Hall a
Mrs. Hall, acted as chaperones.

*i~ - FrsIMthdit huc
18111 ILflu
"hi
10:30 Address by A. W. Stalker
91111 s Subject: SEEKING CHRISTMAS
WIN 7:30 Address by Pastor and Cantata "The Holy N
~IChild" given by the chorus choir.
ea tum
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Many students are applying for jobs
at the "Y" employment bureau. The
work they want is cash jobs that last
through the Christmas vacation. Many
of the students want'jobs clerking in
stores; others want any kind of a job
from driving an automobile to tak-
ing care of a furnace.
This year the "Y" has given em-
ployment to 900 students, or at least
that number of jobs have been handed
out. Hours of the "Y" employment
bureau are from 3 to 6 o'clock, except
Saturdays, when they are from 9 to 12
o'clock.

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