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December 15, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'Y -- FAIR AN]
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UNITED PRESS WI
DAY AND NIGHT SERVI(
T lE ONLY MORNING PAPE]
ANN ARBOR

VOL. XXVII. No. 64. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1916 PRICE FIVE CEN

PEACE PRIZE GOES
TO SGEHMERHOHN
Speech on "The Course of Empire"
Wins Annual Oratorical
Contest
TEEGARDEN PLACES SECOND
James Schermerhorn, Jr., '18, with
his oration, "The Course of Empire,"
last night won the annual University
peace contest. The winner traced the
course of the empires of the world,
their growth and their reliance upon
armed force as a means of settling dis-
putes. He showed that China, Greece,
Rome, and France under Napoleon had
proved that reliance upon military
power was a failure, and pleaded for
an international policing system to'
maintain peace.
H. B. Teegarden, '17, in his speech,
"The Hope of Nations," was given sec-
ond place, declaring that as political
ambition was the basis of all wars and
international disputes that a league to
enforce peace must do away with all
political ambitions, thus doing away
with all wars.
Lois May, '18, the fi'st woman who
has ever spoken in a University peace
contest, was accorded third place by
the judges, taking as her topic, "The
Abandoned Palace." ,l. R. Simpson,
'18, with his oration "Sentinels of
Peace," and Colonel Brown, '19, speak-
ing on "Christianity and Militarism"
were given fourth and fifth places, re-
spectively.
The judges were Miss Gertrude H.
Beggs, Registrar Arthur G. Hall, Dean
Edward H. Kraus, Prof. S. F. Ging-
erich, and Paul W. Ivey. The state
contest will be held at Hillsdale this
year and Schermerhorn will represent
the University at this contest.-

'arkers 'Prepare I~ GAiNBL
for Circus Today IMG RTlON BLL*
Dean Jordan's D.ughnuts,and Ca PASSED BY SENATE

Among Features at Women's
League Affair
If a number of the Women's league
members are noticably hoarse today,
it is not a sign that an epidemic of
bronchitis has broken out but only an
indication that the "barkers" for the
leaguix circus have been rehearsing
their parts in preparation for the
great event this afternoon.
Every side-show is to have its own
"barker", and for the cabaret a good-
loo'king colored waiter in a white coat
will circulate among the crowd an-
nouncing that "Tea and cake, coffee,
and doughnuts, are served down-
stairs." The doughnuts, by the way,
deserve special mention, since Dean
Jordan has promised to make a batch
of the kind that proved so popular last
year.
For the parade, a space around the
sides of the gymnasium is to be roped
off, in order that the spectators need
not fear the wild animals nor the wild
man whom they will see at this time.
Admission to the circus is open to
all girls and to boys under 12 years of
age. The doors are to be open at 4
o'clock.
CAMPUS TO BLLOT ON
ELECTION PUBLICITY
Student Council Decides to Hold Ref-
erendum Vote After
Vacation
The student council decided at a
meeting held last night to hold a cam-
pus referendum shortly after Christ-
mas vacation on the questions of class
politics and sophomore representation1
in the council. This vote will decide
whether the present rule concerning
class election's which suppresses all
campaigning will continue to hold or
whether simple solicitation of votes
will be allowed in the future. An all-
-ampus representative to fill the pres-
ent vacancy on the council will also
be elected at that time.
It was voted by the council that the
chairman and treasurer of the yearly
J-hop committees should be chosen to
act as advisory members of the com-
mittee in the following year.
The four-year freshman dents were
granted permission to organize as a
separate class from the three-year
men.
A committee from the council was
appointed to work on an honor sys-
tem for the literary college in par-
ticular. This committee will work in
co-operation with other similar bodies
on the campus.
EX-GOV. OSBORN TO SPEAK AT
FOOTBALL REVEL IN DETROIT
Ex-Governor Chase S. Osborn will
be the speaker of the evening at the
annual football revel given by the De-
troit alumni in the Detroit Board of
Commerce auditorium Saturday night.
Captain-elect Smith, ex-Captain Maul-
betsch and Trainer Harry Tuthill will
round out the oratorical program. The
Varsity band, cheer leaders, and a stu-'
dent quartct, moving pictures and
vaudeville stunts by both amateurs
and professionals will furnish the en-
tertainment.

Literacy Test Amendment Approved;
64 to 7 Tote Taken; Japanese
Problem the Same
TO EXCLUDE CONTRACT LABOR
Washington, Dec. 14.-The immigra-
tion bill with literacy test attached
Nwas passed by the senate by a vote of
64 to 7 today. The president once,
vetoed the bill because of the literacy
clause. The bill as passed by the sen-
ate leaves the Japanese immigration
problem the same.
Japanese immigration to the United
States is restricted by the Japanese
under what is termed the "gentlemen's
agreement." The bill as it stands ad-
mits Canadian labor to assist in har-
vest work, permits Asiatic immigra-
tion as before, permits Japanese men
previously- admitted to the United!
States to bring Japanese women to
this country for marriage, excludes
contract labor, and requires aliens to
swear, upon seeking admission, that
they have not come to this country
for temporary labor.
The bill excluded from the literacy.
test those who because of religious
persecution have been unable to pre-
pare to meet it.
VICTIM OF STRIKE STABBING
DIES IN GENERAL HOSPITAL
Pete Vlahos, {reek Laborer, Expires
Early T'wrsday Morning; Sus-
pect Held at Jail
That Pete Vlahos, the Greek laborer
who was shot in a Ann street coffee
house Wednesday evening, died in the
University hospital at 3 o'clock yester-
day morning and that John Papanos'
is held in the county jail charged with
the murder of Vlahos, are the latest
developments in the strike situation
of the Hoover Steel Ball company of
Ann Arbpr. Although a crowd of the
strikers met yesterday afternoon and'
threatened the night force that was'
coming to work at 6 o'clock, the po-
lice soon dispersed the mob and as
the city officials have closed the cof-
fee houses about town in which the
strikers have been congregating, most
of the Greeks went to their homes
after meeting in Woodmen hall to per-

Wants Physical Preparedness
New York, Dec. 14.--"The composite physical American looks
smooth, pink and healthy, but he is trying to crowd two lifetimes
into one," E. E. Rittenhouse of the Equitable Life Insurance com-
pany, declared before the association of life insurance presidents
here today. lie added: "He is having some success, but the strain
is telling on him."
Rittenhouse made a plea for physical preparedness, declaring 100,-
000 Americans are annually rejected by life insurance examiners.
The average American is a good liver, he believes, and dies at 40.
Rittenhouse declared :
"His digestive organs have been given so many new and arduous
duties to which they are not trained that they are showing signs
of rebellion. He is more than well-rounded at the belt, and slightly
so at the shoulders. Under exercise he is short-winded, due to lack
of exercise, or a bad heart. He lies down by night and sits down by
day. He never walks when he can ride."

XMAS NUMBER OF THE
GAROYTLE OUT TODAY
Holiday Spirit Pervades Santa Claus
Issue of Michigan's Humor
Magazine
Saint Nicholas prepared for his visit

SIMPLE FUNERL RITES
GIN PROF. KNOWLTON
Practically Entire Law School At.

tends

Burial Ceremony at
Forest Hill

FiRST GLEE CLUB
CONCERT OF YEAF
IS GIVENTONIGH'
SOLOS BY H. L. DAVIS, '17, AND
B. SIKES, '17, FEATURES
OF CHRISTMAS SING
TICKET SELLERS GET PRIE
Fire Dollars Offered to Champion I
diridual Salesman and Chairman
of Best Committee
At 8 o'clock tonight in Hill au'ditc
ium, the University of Michigan Gi
and Mandolin club will make its th
year's bow to the public with a pr
gram that far surpasses anything ev
before attempted on this campus. T
ten numbers arranged by Prof. The
dore Harrison for this Christmas co
cert have been carefully selected
bring out the qualities of the voices
the club as a whole and those of i
soloists, H. L. Davis, '17, and C.
Sikes, '17. The selections for the Ma
dolin club have been chosen with equ
care.
The program will consist of the fo
lowing numbers:
1. (a) Victors. .....Elbel, '
(b) Varsity ............Moore,
Combined clubs.
2. The Blue Danube Waltz .. .Strau
Mandolin club
3. Anything........ ... ..Anybo(
Midnight Sons' quartette
Cherryman, Smith, Westerman, Cai
son
4. Omnipotence .......,Schubert-Lis
Glee club
Solo by H. L.. Davis
F. A. Taber at the organ
5. Orientales........Victor Herbe
Mandolin club quartette
Berman, Parker, Kempton, Davis
6. The Beautiful Rose ......Hastini
Varsity quartette
Davis, Grover, Dieterle, Carlson
7. (a) Meditation .....Bach-Gounc
(b) Marche Militaire,.....Schube
Mandolin club
8. Toreador Song (Carmen).... Biz
Glee club
Solo by Chase B. Sikes
9. Selections
Banjorine sextette
Leininger, Stevens, Gingrich, Aldric
honey, Davis

Funeral services for Professor Je-

Christmas eve to the expectant child- rome Cyril Knowlton were held yes-

ren of the earth will be pictured in
six colors on the cover of the Santa"
Cmaus issue of the Gargoyle which will
appear on sale today at noon on the
streets and in the bookstores.
Everything i the edition savors of
the holiday spirit, from the opening
poem to "Adventures 'Neath the Mis-
tletoe," a fall page drawing which
speaks volumes. Another drawing, a
double page cartoon dealing with the
Christmas experience of a co-ed is
of more than passing interest.
"Confidentially Speaking" is the title
of a play dealing with the question of
the co iference and its relations to
Michigan. This feature is the contri-
bution of one of the foremost writers
on the campus. Prof. H. C. Sadler
of the Engineering college, has contri-
buted a poem entitled "The Lay of the
Lost Toes."
TO CONSIDER PUBLIC STORE
flousewlies' League Attacks Prices at

ELIOW SMOKER TUESDAY

Children to Be Entertained
Christmas Tree a Union

With

The Goodfellow smoker which will
be held at the Union next Tuesday
afternoon from 4 to 6 o'clock, will be
the next feature of the big crusade to
make 'Christmas real for the poor of
Ann Arbor.
Cider, smokes, and plenty of music
and entertainment will be the program
in addition to a giant Christmas tree
for a group of children which the stu-
dents will entertain for the local Fed-
eration of Charities.
The smoker and Christmas tree are
in charge of a committee headed by
William D. Craig, '19. He is being
assisted by Robert L. Biggers, '19E,
James Campbell, '20, Hayden Palmer,
'20, Howard Collins, '20E, and William
Plummer, '20.
A number of fraternities have al-
ready announced their intention of
clothing and giving a dinner to one
boy. Those who have not yet notified
Mrs. William D. Henderson should do
so without delay, as the time is grow-
ing short and arrangements for dis-
tributing among the children must be
made.
"Hindu Civilization" Subject of Talk
Mr. Lajpat Rai, noted Hindu edu-
cator, spoke last night in room 203
University hall on the subject "Hindu
Civilization." His talk was preceded
by Prof. Victor Vaughan, who dis-
cussed the topic, "Eugenics and the
Future Man" before the class in in-
ternational relations.
First Business Ad Smoker Monday
The first smoker of the business
administration department will be held
at the Union Monday night, Dec. 18.
Members of the faculty and out-of-
town speakers will give short talks.A
B. F. Gitcheli, former secretary of the
Detroit board of' commerce, has been
secured to address the gathering.

feet an organization, to spend a quiet 'lass Meeting Tomorrow
evening.
Mr. L. J. Hoover, manager of the
company, stated last night that more The Housewives' league could no
than 75 per cent of the men employees doubt make a success of a public
were back to work yesterday. store," said Mayor Wurster last night
when asked what his opinion was of
Toastmasters Initiate Four New Men the petition to the city council that
Mr. Lyman Bryson of the Rhetoric the Housewives' league received from
faculty, H. A. Fitzgerald, '17, R. W.
Rose, '17E, and G. R. Lorwill, '20, different farmers about Ann Arbor ask-
were .initiated into Toastmasters' so- ing for a public store at which they
ciety Wednesday evening. Mr. Bryson could sell their commodities direct to
was the speaker of the evening at the the public. "But I think that the
Catalpa Inn banquet. Housewives' league ought to take
--charge of the store instead of the city
Senior Engineers Hold Dinner council, as they are more in touch
More than 100 senior engineers at- with the movement."
tended their first class dinner of the Mrs. E. M. Richar, president of the
year held last night at the Union. S. league, will appoint a committee to in-
M. Abrams acted as toastmaster and vestigate the practicability of estab-
talks were given by A. E. Hecker, the lishing such a store, before the big
class president; Prof. A. H. White of mass meeting of the citizens of Ann
the chemical engineering department, Arbor, housewives, students, and all
and R. J. Dondero, who was manager persons who are interested in com-
of the class football team this fall. ( bating the high cost of living in this
Carlos Zanelli pleased all present with city, which will be held at 7:30 o'clock
the musical numbers which he ren- tomorrow evening in the Ann Arbor
dered. high school auditorium.f

terday afternoon at the residence on
Hill street. Interment followed at the
family lot in Forest Hill cemetery. In
accordance with the wishes of the fam-
ily, the services were verly simply, the
Rev. Mr. Wells of the Baptist church
reading the Baptist burial service.
President Harry B. Hutchins and
Judge E. D. Kenne of Ann Arbor were
named as honorary pall bearers. Dean
Henry M. Bates, Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley, Prof. Joseph H. Drake, Prof.
George W. Patterson, Prof. Henry C.
Adams, and Regent Junius E. Beal
bore the body to its final resting place.
Practically the entire student body,
of the .Law school was present to do
honor to its late friend. The students
went in a body to the house where,
with bared heads, they formed a lane
three tiers deep leading from the
house to the street. They then ac-
companied the procession on either
side of the street to the cemetery
where they formed a large semicircle:
about the ,grave while the short com-
mittal service was pronounced.
PEACE CAUSES STOCK FLURRY
Cerman Proposition Makes U. S. Steel
Drop Six Points in New York
New York, Dec. 14.-The stock mar-.
ket was thrown into feverish activity
by a bear drive and by the dumping
of stocks by traders who feared the
effects of peace this afternoon. Prices
,t leaders tumbled from three to more
!han ten points. The weakness con-
enucd to the close. United States
rnpped to 1131-2 shortly before the
.mrket closed, against 1191-4 at the
close yesterday. Steel recently sold
above 129. The break of this after-
noon was more serious than that which
came on Tuesday after the announce-
ment of German peace proposals.
Washington, Dec. 14.-Expressing
for the people of this country "deep
regret" for the unutterable suffering
of Armenia, President Wilson this
afternoon accepted a memorial of
thanks tendered him by the Rt. Rev.
(Continued on Page Six.)'

10.

(a) Robin Adair
(b) Schneider's Band ..
...arr. by Dudley Buck 1V

Glee club
Laudes atque Carmina..A. A. Stan1
Combined clubs
An innovation this year is the dan
in Barbour gymnasium directly follov
ing the concert. Fisher's ten pie
orchestra will furnish the music ar
refreshments will be served. Ticke
for this dance are $1.00, and may
purchased at the Union, Huston's, a
the Busy Bee.
In order to increase the rival
among those selling tickets to the cc
cert, a prize of $5.00 will be given t
individual disposing of the large
number, and a similar amount will
awarded the chairman of the leadi
campus committee.
Dinners at the Union will be giv
the four highest individual salesme
the chairmen of the four campus co:
mittees which stand nearest the to
and the two members of the advisc
board whose committee have made t
best showing. All those who des:
to enter this competition are urged
make a report of their sales at soi
time before the concert.
Correction of Woolsack Announceme
In an account of the five men chos
for Woolsack, junior law honorary's
ciety, in yesterday's issue of The Dai
the election of R. L. Carpenter w.
erronously stated. Henry I. Eag
was elected instead. Carpenter w
taken into the society two years a

U 4

OUT

TODAY

THE

ARGOLE

The Best Issue Ever Published

F !i

GLEE

AND

Hill

Auditorium

8:00 P. M.

MANDOLIN

Christmas

Concert

CLUB

25c

THIS VERY

NIGHT

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