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December 14, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-14

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SDAY-PARTLY CLOUDY
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DAILY

UNITED PRESS WIF
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
'tilE ONLY MORNING PAPER
ANN ARBOR

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VOL. XXVII. No. 3. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1916. PRICE FIVE CEJ

HOLD FUNERIL9OF
KNOWLTON TODAY
SERVICES FOR PROMINENT LAW
PROFESSOR TO BE HELD
AT 3 O'CLOCK
ALL LAW CLASSES DISMISSED
Students to Meet in Front of Law
Building at 2:50 O'clock and
Attend in Body
Funeral services for Professor Je-
rome Cyril Knowlton will be held at
3 o'clock this afternoon at the house at
1429 Hill street. According to the
wishes of the family, the services will
be simple and more or less private.
From the b;>use the procession will
proceed directly to Forest Hill ceme-
tery where only the immediate family
and close friends will witness the in-
terment.
Out of regard and respect for Prof.
Knowlton exercises in the Law school
will be suspended during the entire
day.

COTIN PEACE
CONTEST MEET TONIGHT

Winnci in Trials to Compete at State
Meet; Woman on Pro-
gram
Regent Junius Beal of Ann Arbor
will preside at the annual peace con-
test to be held tonight in University
hall, at which .ime five contestants
will each deliver an oration dealing
with some phase of international
peace.
The judges are Registrar A. E. Hall,
Dean E. H. Kraus, Prof. F. S. Ginge-
rich, Gertrude Beggs, social head of
Martha Cook dormitory, and Paul W.
Ivey.
For the first time in the peace con-
tests of the University a woman will
appear as one of the contestants.
The winner of this contest will com-
pete at the state contest to be held at
Hlillsdale this year. Following that,
the interstate contest will be held to
choose the speakers for the national
contest in June at the Lake Mohawk
conference.
ANNU ARBR1 WOMEN PLAN
BIG BOYCOTT ON EGGS
All Classes of People to Meet in High
School Hall Saturday
Night

lIOEMNITY NEEDED
FOR PEACE TERMSI
Germany Must Pay for All Destruc-
tion to have Entente Powers
Heed Suggestions
RUSS TO GET CONSTANTINOPLE
BULLETIN.
Merlin, Dec. 13.-A Greek cap-
tain has captured Katerini and
now stands with 5,000 men op-
rpssed to the French whose line of
posts has been pierced. Fighting
is going on north of Katerini, be.
tween Greek regulars and French
troops.

Men Appeari Crude Feminine Cos-
tumes; Successful Ones Will
be Notified
--
More than 60 students, some of them
in roughly-made feminine garments,
displayed their abilities before the
judging committee of the first opera
cast tryout, held in the Alpha Nu
rooms last night. From the number
and calibre of those who tried out last
night, those in charge feel confident
that an exceptional cast can be sel-
ected.
The judging committee will meet
today to discuss the work of those
who appeared last night and a -pre-
liminary selection will be made. Those
who are to continue in the tryout will
be notified by card some time this
week. Material will be assigned them
immediately after vacation.
Director Morgan is expected to ar-
rive in Ann Arbor the first Monday
after vacation, and will be here for
about two weeks to put the 1917 show
under way. A second tryout will be
held shortly after he arrives, at
which time an elimination of present
cast tryouts will be made.
Arthur Schupp, '17E, general chair-
man, also urged last night, that those
who fail to make the cast tryout come
out for the chorus tryout, which will
be held after vacation.

6o Compete for
Places in Opera

ONE DYING, TWO IN JIL, DUE TO
RIOT AMONG STRIKERSiAT GREEK
COFFEE HOUSE EARLY LAST NIGI
* * * * * * * * * * HOOVER STEEL BALL COMPA
* BE A GOODFELLOW! EMPLOYEE SHOT IN STOM-
_* ACH AFTER QUARREL
# Here's the list of contributors: *
*Griffins . $10.15 *MiDfl
S Vulcans ................10.10 * II TiEUI U
Splklnx .................. 5.00 *

7

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* Scalp and Blade.......
* Cercle Francais........
* A delphi.................
* Archons............
* Senior Society ..........
* Illinois Club..........
State Street Merchant....
* * * * * * * * * * *

5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
3.25
1.00
* *

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

s
k
k
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r

Riot Is Climax of Stormy Day
Which Discontented Greeks Pa-
rade Streets of City

At a meeting of the law faculty yes-
terday noon it was decided to send a
floral offering to the family as a mute
expression of the feeling which the
faculty members experienced in the
loss of their associate. Dean Bates
and Professors Wilgus, Vogel, and
Drake were appointed as a committee
to draw up resolutions to express the
faculty's appreciation of Professor
Knowlton and its sympathy to his
family.
At 4 o'clock in the afternoon all
three classes in the Law sclool met
together to decide upon a fitting way
to honor their late teacher and friend.
After deciding to send flowers to the
family as an expression of their grief,
a resolution was passed to establish a
Knowlton memorial loan fund for the
purpose of helping needy students in
the Law school. A committee of six,
two men from each class, is to have
charge of receiving the contributions
from the students which will estab-
lish, a nucleus about which the fund
may grow.
It was also decided at this time that
the law students should meet in front
of the Law building at 2:50 o'clock and
from there go in a body to the house,
where if the plans are not changed,
they will form an honorary body guard
from the house to the cemetery gates.
Dean Bates stated that a memorial
service would probably be held for
Professor Knowlton later in the year.
"MAGIC CARPET" PROGRESSES
RAPIDLY UNDER PROF. NELSON
"We, expect to have every detail of
every act perfect before Christmas
vacation," said Prof. J. Raleigh Nel-
son, director and author of the "Magic
Carpet," the Cosmopolitan club's new
play, last night.
There are about 125 people in the
production, which will be given in Hill
auditorium Friday, Jan. 12. Miss Alice
Evans, instructor in Barbour gymnas-
ium, is in charge of the dancing.
Abraham Gornetsky, '17, writer of the
music for last year's Union opera, has
written the music for the play, and
will have charge of the orchestra.
ACTUARIAL SOCIETY ELECTS
12 NEW MEMBERS AT MEETING
At a recent meeting of the Actuarial
society the following persons were
elected to honorary membership: Prof.
L. C. Karpinski of the mathematics
department, H. C. Carver, and J. W.
Baldwin. In addition to these the fol-
lowing were also receivred; into the so-
ciety: H. C. Marvin, grad., Elizabeth
Collver, grad., Susan Rambo, grad.,
Olive Outwater, grad., Marian Wil-
liams, '18, E. G. Hildner, '18, J. H.
Ginsburg, '18, W. 1. Zabel, '18, and C.
C. Dubuar, '18.

By W. S. Forest
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
London, Dec. 13.-The terms which
are believed to constitute the only
bVsis upon which the entente powers
are willing to enter upon peace ne-
gotiations were ascertained this after-
noon from various sources by the
United Press. One of the provisions
would be through full indemnity by
Germany for devastation to the nations
which she has invaded. The terms
are as follows:
Terms Suggested.
The evacuation and restoration of
all occupied territory, including Bel-
gium, France. Poland, Serbia, and
Roumania, with full indemnity for the
devastation which German occupancy
of those territories has entailed.
Restoration of Alsace-Lorriane to
France, cession of the Constantinople
straits to Russia, indemnity ship for
ship and ton for ton for all destroyed
shipping, adequate punishment for
those responsible for atrocities com-
munitted by German forces.
Distribution of German Colonies.
It was emphasized in all quarters
that the only questions of a possibly
negotiable character in the peace pro-
ceedings might be as to the distribu-
tion of certain conquered German col-
onies, and as to the character and limi-
tation of Germany's future armament.

Ann Arbor business men, house-
wives, students, and boarding house
proprietors will unite in a mass meet-
ing in the high school auditorium at
7:30 o'clock Saturday evening to dis-
cuss the high cost of living. Speeches
by a city business merchant, a repre-
sentative of the Housewives' league, a
boarding house proprietor, and a stu-
dent representative of the student body
will be given.
That the women of the city will co-
operate in the movement is shown by
the fact that every member of the
Housewives' league which met yester-
day afternoon in the council chamber
was heartily in favor of mass meet-
ings at which different citizens and
students can express their approval
or disapproval of a boycott campaign.
The question of a public store was
also drought up by the housewives. A
letter was received from the Grangers'
association asking for some store at
which the farmers could sell their
commodities to the public direct. A
committee will be appointed to look
into the matter.
WEATHER EXPERT GIVES TALK
FOR BENEFIT OF GOODFELLOWS
Norman B. Conger, director of the
Detroit weather bureau, and GeorgeR
R. Swain of the Latin department de-
livered two lectures which cnstituted
the Goodfellow entertainment in Uni-
versity hall last night.
Both lectures were illustrated and
were interesting and instructive. +
The proceeds of the entertainment
will be turned over by the Goodfellowsc
to the local Federation of Charities. .
Facsimile of Earliest-Book on DisplayI
Students and the general public will
have their last opportunity today of
seeing a facsimile of the "Gutenberg
Bible," the first book in history to be
printed. The book is now on display
in room 219 of the Natural Science
building. It belongs to the collection]
of A. M. Todd of Kalamazoo.

WOOLSACK CHOOSES FIVE MEN'
Selection Made Purely on Basis of
Scholarship
Only five men were chosen for Wool-
sack, junior law honorary society, for
the following year. These men were
selected on purely scholastic merits.
They are: R. L. Carpenter, David Hu-
bar, James Thomas, C. L. Strauss, and
Melvin Gombrig. Prof. Edson R.
Sunderland was the speaker at the
banquet which was held at the Ren-
ellen Hospice.
ADELPIiI WILL HAVE PARTIES
Debating Society to Model Itself After
Federal Congress

DOLLS TO REPRESENT FAGUILTy
Women's League Members Will Hold
Circus on Friday
"Hits on the Faculty" might be said
to characterize the side show run by
the freshmen at the Women's league
circus Friday afternoon, Dec. 15. Dolls
representing popular faculty members
will be lined up in a row, and prizes
given the contestants who knock down
the greatest number.
Sophomores are to exhibit a collec-
tion of freaks and monstrosities, which
may also be seen at 4 o'clock in the
parade in the gymnasium. A wrestling
match between two fat men is the
chief attraction of the junior class
stunt. Upstairs in SarahnCaswell
Angell hall, members of the senior
class will present several new variety
acts.
The parade is always a big feature of
the circus, and this year in addition to
elephants, monkeys, and a wild man,
an added interest will be given by a
band and drum-major at the proces-
sion's head. The smallest Japanese
family in captivity is to be exhibited
at this time.
NEW YORK GERMAN CONSULATE
NAMED IN ALLEGED CONSPIRACY

The above dispatch passed by the
British censor is in marked contrast
to the terms under which a high Ger-
man embassy official told the United
Press yesterday Germany would be
willing to make peace.
Serbians Launch New Attacks East
Berlin, Dec. 13.-"New Serbian at-
tacks have been launched east of the
Cerna," said the second official war
office statement tonight. "Our ninth
army approached Buveu, Roumania.
Firing on the Somme and the east
bank of the Meuse has been revived."
Canadian Gov. Gen. Describes Peace
Montreal, Dec. 13.-"We ran many
risks in attempting to maintain peace
and we are not going to sheathe the
sword until we have gained a peace
which is of our making and of our
choosing," the Duke of Devonshire,
Canada's governor-general, said in ad-
dressing the Canadian club this after-
noon.
His remarks were made in reply to
the toast to- the king, and the senti-
ments he expressed regarding the Ger-
man peace proposals evoked much en-
thusiasm and applause.1
"Despite heavy sacrifices," he said,
"we are going to continue this war
until we can gain a peace we shall'
have every reason to believe will pre-
(Continued on Page Six)

By a unanimous vote, the Adelphi
house of representatives at its meet-
ing Tuesday night voted to adopt the
party system in all discussions, as it
is now in use in the federal congress.
Party leaders have already been
picked. Representative Henry F.
Massnick, '18, has been chosen to lead
the Democratic members, and Repre-
sentative Irving S. Toplon, '19L, will
head the Republican forces. The mem-
bers at this meeting lined up as fol-
lows: Democrats, 12; Republicans, 13;
Socialist. 1. This almost even balance
may be changed when some of the
members who were not present at this
meeting disclose their political affilia-
tion.
Dr. Warthin Talks to Canadian Troops
Dr. A. S. Warthin, director of the
pathological laboratory in the Medical
school, returned from Canada Monday
of this week after having delivered a
series of three lectures on venereal
disease to the departing soldiers.
Dr. Warthin delivered lectures at Bar-
rie Field camp, Ont.; Hamilton, Ont.,
and in the barracks at London, Ont.
The lectures were attended by large
audiences ranging from 2,500 to 3,000
soldiers.

San Francisco, Dec. 13.-The Ger-
man consulate in New York City was
involved in the alleged conspiracy of
German officials in San Francisco
against the shipment for the allies dur-
ing today's testimony by Lewis J.
Smith, war witness for the government
in the trial of German Consul Bopps
and associates, on charges of neu-
trality violations.
Smith declared that he had gone to
the New York consulate, had told his
name and the nature of his business
and had been instructed what to do.
C. C. Crowley and he went to Chicago,
the witness testified, where horses
were being prepared for shipment to
the allies.
"Crowley told me to get implements
which could be used to break open
cars containing horses so that ex-
plosive could be planted," he said.
Missing German Consul Is- Found
Washington, Dec. 13.-Arnold Vogel,
German counsul at Colima, Mexico, re-
PCsed idnapped by Mexican bandits,
ha retuni .ti to Colima, according to
the report from Admiral Caperton to
the navy department today. Vogel was
reported held for $15,000 ransom but
the dispatch stated it was not known
whether the ransom has been paid.

One Greek laborer is dying in the
University hospital and another is in-
jured, while two are held in the city
jail, as the result of a riot which
occurred among strikers of the Hoov-
er Steel Ball company, in a Greek cof-
fee huse on Ann street last night.
It wa.3 believed that the man in the
University hospital, John Derijios,
could not live through the night.
The riot served as a climax to a
stormy day in which the discontent-
ed Greeks paraded the streets of the
city, were kept from the factory by a
force of 75 policemen, and attacked a
sub-foreman who refused to join the
ranks of the strikers.
The two Greeks now held in the jail
are: John Predonoski, and Nickolo
Derijios. The former was injured in
the fight in the coffee house, the latter,
is a brother dfthe man in thehospital.
The remainder of the rioters escaped
before the police arrived.
Trouble began to brew when a crowd
of the strikers drifted into the shop
yesterday afternoon. A quarrel arose,
during which Derijios was shot in the
stomach with a 38-caliber revolver,
which was carried by one of the
Greeks, it is believed. The police ar-
rived in response to a riot call. John
Derijios was sent to the hospital,
where it was first thought that he
would die within a few hours. At a
late hour last night, however, he was
still alive.
Derijios was one of the strikers, it
is believed, who marched to the Hoov-
er shops this morning demanding an
increase of four cents per hour and
time and a half for overtime, Sundays
and holidays, as compared with offers
made by L. J. Hoover to give employ-
ees a two per cent increase in wages.
Turned away by the police, the
strikers marched up and down the
streets until noon when they met a
foreign sub-foreman who had refused
to join the "hold out." They rushed
at him, one of the men pulling a knife.
Some friend slipped a dagger into
the hand of the foreman and he met
the charge, cutting a finger from the
man's hand who held the knife. The
police were called and dispersed the
crowd.
SOPH LIT PARTY TO BE HELD
NEXT SATURDAY AFTERNOON
The first soph lit party of the year
will be given next Saturday afternoon
in Barbour gymnasium in the form of
a "mixer." The music will be fur-
nished by Fisher's university or-
chestra.
No admission will be charged those
sophomores who have their dues paid
up. They may pay same at the door
if they have not already done so.
Refreshments will be served and
there will be dancing from 3 to 6
o'clock.
MUST SECURE TICKETS FOR
CLEVELAND TRIP BY SUNDAY
Cleveland special committee an-
nounced yesterday that ten more
places are open on the train and that
it will leave at 12:10 sharp on the
A. A. All tickets must be purchased
by Sun day, and these may be bought.
at the Union, or from the men on the
committee.
There will be a separate car for all
girls who wish to go. Tickets may be
reserved by calling up the Union.

For all

TO-NIGHT

6:30

For all

METHODIST.
YoungPeople

W SLEYAN GUILD

METHODIST
Yung People

BA NQU ET
TICKETS AT CALKINS

50c

500

U U

Hill

TO-MOR ROW
Cr as

NIGHT

8:00 P. M.

Concert

ditorium

GLEE

AND

MANDOLIN

CLUB

25c

e

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