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December 13, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Vi'

UF1 COST OF LIVING
ised Cost of Necessities Due to
War, Can Only be Met by
Increase in Wages
v York, Dec. 12.-The high cost
ng is in no danger of being re-
through any action congress
ake regarding it, announce J. S.
and company, in their weekly
v of the country's news. High
are a result of the war, and
mly be met to some degree of sat-
ion by the raising of wages to
pond to the increased cost of
mnptive materials, which is pre-
what is taking place, as wages
1 general 30 per cent above the:
occupied by them before the war.
contest with labor, brought on
e advanced cost of living, is ex-
I to come to a crisis in the pend-
,ruggle on the railroad wage law.
dent Wilson has announced a
stand against any future threat-
:ie-up of American industry, such
emed likely last summer, and a
> prevent any such will soon be
uced into congress.
railroads in turn arc' seeking
1 rates to meet the advance in
>st of labor, and the President
ecided that the proper way to
such a raiseabout is through
edium of the inter-state com-
commission. He states that its
to grant an increase in rates
ground of increased wages and
sed cost of supplies is indis-
ly clear, and that a recommenda-
y congress with regard to such
ter might seem to draw in ques-
he scope of the commission's au-
y, Chicago Police Chief, Resigns
ago, Dec. 12.-Charles C. Healey
esterday handed his resignation
perintendent of police to Mayor
m Hale Thompson. It will take
Jan. 1. The resignation was the
ne of a long fight over Chicago
-conditions, one result of which
he indictment of Healey for fail-
* enforce anti-vice laws.
ig new stock of 1917 calendars
>icture inserts) at 1915 prices.
n's. Sun-eod
Michigan Daily for service.

New Number of Humor Magazine
Contain Many New Featur;s
and Improvements

to

New features and general improve-
ments on the interior and exterior de-
sign will appear in the Santa Claus
issue of the Gargoyle, which will go
on sale at 12 o'clock Friday, at all of
the news stands and book stores. The
edition will be limited to 1800 copies,
all of which will be put on sale at the
same time.
One of the best known dramatists on
the campus will contribute the lead-
ing feature of the month in the way of
a play. dealing with the conference
question as related to Michigan. The
author's natural dislike for seeing his
name in print and his refusal to allow
the play to run unless his dislike was
respected, prevent the publishing of
the author's name at this time. The
Gargoyle staff insists that the strength!
of the appeal contained in the play will
be enough to settle the conference
question for good in the minds of the
student body.
In addition to the big story, the us-
ual double page cartoon will appear
bearing the Christmas message to the
readers of the magazine. A special
Christmas cover is six colors will
adorn the outside of the Christmas
humor .book.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
AT THE THEATERS
TODAY
* Majestie=-Vaiudeville. *
* *
* Orpheum - Robert Edeson in *
"The Light That Failed." *
*h
* A rade-Alice Brady in "Bought *
* and Paid For.". Mutt and Jeff
* cartoon.
. *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
AT THE GARRICK, DETROIT
No theatrical event of the year has
attracted more widespread attention
than the coming week's appearances,
beginning next Monday evening, of E.
H. Sothern at the Garrick theater, De-
troit. This brief visit marks the fare-
well of America's most distinguished
actor and will be signalized by a note-

worthy act of generosity on his part
as Mr. Sothern is giving outright to
the Red Cross every penny of his share
of the proceeds, amounting to 25 per
cent of the gross receipts. Not only
is he paying his own personal ex-
penses, but he is even paying the cost
of transmitting the money to the Red
Cross headquarters in London. In ad-
dition, Mr. Lee Shubert, under whose
personal direction Mr. Sothern con-
tinues to be, will give one-fourth of the
profits of the tour to that same agency
of mercy.
For this occasion Mr. Sothern has
selected Justin Huntley McCarthy's
splendidly colorful romantic play, "If
I Were Ding." Mr. Sothern's role of
the semi-legendary poet-soldier-lover,
Francois Villon, is unquestionably his
romantic masterpiece. In his hands it
has gone down in the theatrical his-
tory as one of the truly memorable
character-creations, breathing the very
essence of romance, filled with the
lovely spirit of youth. It is a poet's
conception of a poet, enacted by a
poet. The mad adventures of Villon,
his gallantry to the beautiful Kather-
ine de Vaucelles, his temporary eleva-
tion to great power by King Louis XI
of France, his peril and his regenera-
tion through love makes a dramatic
action that has no equal in modern
stage annals.

action of the piece is keyed up to the
highest pitch, feature following feature
in such rapid succession that encores
have to be eliminated. This is to be
expected when one views the roster of
the principals of the company, which
includes William Norris. Conroy and
Le Maire, Collins and Hart, the Court-
ney Sisters, Wanda Lyon, Rosie Quinn,
Margaret Edwards, McMahon, Diamond
and Chaplow, and Franklin Batie.

practically a new stage creation in
that it is absolutely true to life. All
the characters are those we have met
and talked with thousands of times.
The art of. Mr. Broadhurst in as-
sembling his perfectly true incidents
in a perfect manner, naturally makes
an unbeatable arrangement when com-
bined with the true to life characters
who are affected by those incidents.
As the story is unfolded before us on
the screen, it is not so much a play
as the real thing. Alice Brady first
appears as the charming school girl
whom everyone knows and loves. In
stringent circumstances, she is com-
pelled to leave school and go out to

support. After her marriage to a
multi-millionaire her work really
starts and Miss Brady's presentation
of the struggles she has to bring out
the good side of her husband's nature,
will not easily be forgotten. Miss
Brady has scored big successes in
every release she has had since ap-
pearing before the camera.
We can supply you with anything
known to the wall-paper and paint
trade. C, IH. Major & Co. tf
Venus Perfect Pencil--Best in the
world, at Wahr's Book Stores.

AT THE ARCADE

Alice Brady in "Bought and Paid
For" will be shown at the Arcade this
afternoon and evening. This play is

k

SHOP 'EARLY

SHOP EARLY

SCHU' AC

NA-ROWARE

CO.

A Store of Individual Shops
308-10-12 South Main St.

Special Sale of White Decorated and Plain Casseroles, Wednesday,
December 13th, Regular Price $3.50, Sale Price $2.69.
Only Seven More Shopping Days for Students

AT THE WHITNEY.

"The Miracle of Saint Anthony" by
Maurice Maeterlink is one of the of-
ferings of the Washington Square Play-
ers who come to the Whitney theater
Dec. 15. The play deals with the
question of whether or not a person
is willing to give up a valuable legacy
left at the death of a friend in order
to restore that friend life if it were
offered him by some miracle.
In "A World of Pleasure," which
comes to the Whitney theater Satur-
day, Dec. 16, the directors of the
Winter Garden are said to have clearly
demonstrated that the American the-
atergoing public will give heartiest
support to a thoroughly clean musical
extravaganza, provided it has comedy,
musical, dancing, scenic, and costum-
ing embellishments of merit. These
qualifications belong to "A World of
Pleasure," and from the rise of the
first curtain to *the final number, the
SHOOK PARTY SA Ti RDAY NIGHT
S TO 12 AT BARBOUIR GYN, TICK-
ETS ON SALE, UNION FOR $1.00. 13

Nothtng More Appropriate Could Be Found For A Cift.

Silver Baking Dishes, Mahogany Trays, Chafing
Dishes, Percolators, Coffee Sets, Lemonade Sets, Salad
Dishes, Casseroles, Pie Plates, Five O'clock Teas, Tea
Wagons, Book Ends, Black Cat Door Stops, Nut Bowls,
Mahogany Candy Boxes, Manicure and Traveling Sets,
Candle Sticks, Game Shears, Lander's Fravey Clocks,
Community, Rogers, and Solid Silver Ware, Electrical
Irons, Grills, Hot Plates, Curling Irons and Pop Corn
Poppers, Chafing , Spoon and Fork, Coffee and Tea

Stands, Fruit Dishes, Flexible Flyers and Sleds, are going very fast. Spaulding Skate and Shoe Outfit
$4.00; ready to try on. Great Skate and Shoe for the money. Boy's Skates, 75c to $2.50.

10 Per Cent Reduction on All
Carving Sets This Week.

I 1

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1h atier

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g uutier
3reweters

M4ate

street

Are offering a Distinctive line of Merchandise made by the oldest and
American manufacturers. Goods which are Guaranteed and Recoginize
Finest Obtainable at a reasonable price. We have this year endeavored to
buying to goods which will satisfy the most discriminating shoppers.
You are cordially invited to come in and see The Most BeautifulN
America-The Lady Gruen and The Gruen Verithin for men.

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Watches

Jewelry

Silverware

Clocks

Leather Goods

Clas

Complete Optical Stock of Eye Glasses and Frames.

I leading
d asth
limit our
Watch in .
sware
a prompt p
ables you
en pieces
I Etc.
rCLASSl: .
.Sii

Our Lens Grinding Plant facilitates us to grind your eye glass lenses in
and efficient manner. Our large stock of eye glass frames and accessories en
to select just what will satisfy you. Bring in your prescription and the brok
of eye glasses and we will replace the lenses very promptly.

Opera Glasses

Reading Glasses

Eye Glass Chains

Reels Cords and

ADD A PEARL NECKLACE

CORHAM SILVERWARE

KLEVER KRAFT SILVER

HAWKES CUi

L. E. WATERMAN PENS

MICHIGAN JEWELRY AND NOVELTIE

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state street 3ewelers

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