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December 12, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-12

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UNITED PRESS V
DAY AND NIGHT SERV
THE ONLY MORNING PAP
ANN ARBOR

PROBABLY

VOL. XXVIL No, 61.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1916.

PRICE FIVE

CONGER TO SPEAK
ON WORK OF U. -S,
WEATHER BUREAU
G. R. SWAIN WILL BE OTHER LEC-
TURER ON GOODFELLOW-
SHIP PROGRAM
WILL ILLUSTRATE BOTH TALKS
Speakers Contribute Their Services
Free of Charge; Proceeds Go
to Goodfellow Fund
Everything about the weather and
the work of the United States weather"
bureau upon which specialists are
able to express opinions will be
touched upon by Norman B. Conger,
chief of the Detroit weather bureau,
tomorrow night in his lecture which
will be given as a part of the Good-
fellow lecture in University hall. Mr.
George R. Swain of the Latin depart-
ment will give the other lecture. Both
talks will be illustrated.
Mr. Conger will tell about .the in-
struments in use and various inter-
ests which are served by the weather
bureau, as well as some of the meth-
ods of' frost protection now in use.
The use - of weather maps and the
movements of storm areas will also
be discussed and illustrated along

Late News Briefs
Tiea surer McAdoo to Stay in Cabinet
Washington, Dec. 11.-The repeated
reports that he was to resign today
drew from Secretary of the Treasury
McAdoo the following formal state-
ment: "I have no intentions of re-
signing from the cabinet."
Repeats Request for Safe Passage
Washington, Dec. 11.-Having failed
to get a satisfactory reply from rep-
resentations in behalf of safe pas-
sage for the new Austrian ambassa-
dor, Count Tarnowski, the state de-
partment today addressed a second
note to England in the matter.
Supreme Court to Act on Bank Case
Washington, Dec. 11.-The supreme
court today advanced for argument on
Feb. 26 the case in which Grant Fel-
lows, attorney general of Michigan,
seeks to invalidate the federal board
reserve order giving tobanks which
are members of the federal reserve
system the right to act as adminis-
trators. State banks doubt the valid-
ity of the order.
Asks Repeal of Canadian Reciprocity
Washington, Dec. 11.-Representa-
tive Sloan of Nebraska today intro-
duced a resolution asking the repeal
of the Canadian reciprocity act. Sloan
stated that acceptance by Canada of
the pact at this time might be em-
barrassing to the United States.
REAL CIRCUS ARRIVES
IN ANN. ARBOR FRIDAY

EGG BOYCOTT WILL
START THIS WEEK
Hold Meeting Tomorrow to Decide
Whether Ann Arbor Women
Will Help Movement
BOARDING HOUSES ALSO AGREE
Ann Arbor's boycott on eggs seems
certain to go into effect this week
with practically every boarding house
and lunch room in the city ready to
take an active part in the movement.
At the meeting of the Housewives'
league to be held at 2:30 o'clock to-
morrow afternoon in the council room
chamber, the question of whether the
women of the city will help in the egg
boycott will be brought up.
Boarding house keepers said yes-
terday that they would join in the
boycott on eggs, if the students did
not object.
A number of men and women on the
campus yesterday expressed their ap-
proval of the egg boycott. The fol-
lowing stated that they were heartily
in favor of the movement: John C. B.
Parker, '17, Managing editor of The
Daily; Margaret Reynolds, '17, presi-
dent of the Women's league; Grant
Cook, '17L, president of the student
council; Glenn Coulter, '18L, president
of the Michigan Union; Edward F.
Walsh, '17, managing editor of the
Michiganensian; E. A. Baumgarth, '17,
managing editor of the Inlander; B.
L. McNamee, '17E, editor of the Mich-
igan Technic; Josephine Randall, '17,
president of the Y. W. C. A. A cam-
paign among the fraternities, soror-
ities, and house clubs will be started
this week to obtain their co-operation
and help in the egg boycott movement.
Mrs. Edouard Richar, president of
the Housewives' league of Ann Arbor,
has received a letter from Mrs. Julian
Heath of New York, national president
of the Housewives' League of America,
in which Mrs. Heath appeals to all the
women of America to join in the boy-
cott movement.

055 GABRILOWITSCHI,
-GIVES (XONCERT

WHO
TONIGHT

GREAT RUSSIAN PIANIST
APPEARS THIS EVENING

r%

PREM IER BRIANiW L U MNFE C 1

* BE A GOODFELLOW!

*

*
*
*
*
4'
*
*

Society contributions to date:
Vuicans ............$10.10
Sphinxs..........$. 5.05
Scalp and Blade.........5.00
Cercle Francais. .........5.00

*
*
*
*

I

GERMANY'S REPLY
ON BELGIUM HERE
Teaitolis lld Actions Justified by In-
ternational Law as Cited
at hague
APPROVE EFFECT OF PROTEST
By Carl W. Ackerman
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Berlin, Dec. 11.-Germany's reply to
the "friendly protest" of America
against the Belgian deportation was
handed to Charles Grew, of the Amer-
ican embassy, today by Foreign Sec-
retary Zimmerman. It was immed-
iately cabled to Washington. It is
understood that while Germany does
not concede all the American repre-
sentations, the whole effect of the
protest will be good.
Germany holds her actions in Bel-
gium are justified by that part of the
Hague international law regulation,
requiring a qower occupying an in-
7aded nation to maintain order and
permitting "additional orders" to that
end.
Test of Statement
The statement follows:
"The Swiss minister at Berlin, in
conversation with the chancellor, noti-
fied him that the rumors of transport-
ation of Belgian workmen had unfav-
orably impressed the Swiss popula-
tion. As a result information was giv-
en the Swiss government concerning
the' legal aspects of the case. The
Belgian government, through the
Spanish 'embassy in Berlin which is
charged with representation of Bel-
ian interests, protested against the
transportation of Belgian workmen to
Cermaany and their employment here.
The protest was declined, as announc-
ed.
Order of Governor General l

Osip Gabrilowitsch Credited With
Having Few Rivals in World
of Music
Ossip Gabrilowitsch, the famous
Russian pianist who will appear in
Hill auditorium at 8 o'clock this even-
ing, has few equals in the musical
world today. A musician by instinct
as well as education, he has dis-
tinguished himself not only. as a pian-
ist of the highest type, but as a com-
poser and conductor as well. He has
visited America five times, and each
time has made a profound impression,
His playing is broad, sincere, full
of sympathy, warmth, romance and
charm.
The following program will be pre-
sented:
Variations (The Harmonious Black-
smith).....................Handel
Rondo espressive (Ph. Em.)... Bach
Le Coucou....................Daquin
Gavotte, B minor (arranged by
Saint-Saens)...............Bach
Sonata, G minor, Op. 22...Schumann
Allegro appassionato; Andantino;
Scherzo; Presto.
Nocturne, F major, Op. 15,
Etude, Op. 10, No. 8,
Valse, A flat major, Op. 34.....Chopin
Pres d'e la Mer .............. Arensky
Gavotte ................... Glazunow
Caprice-Burlesque, Op. 3...........
......................Gabrilowitsch
LECTURES ON NAVY'S HISTORY
W. f. Lewis, Mayor of Lake Forest, to
Give Illustrated Lecture Tonight.
William Mather Lewis, secretary of
the Navy league for the middle west,
will give an illustrated lecture at 8:15
o'clock toight in the lecture room of
the Natural Science building, on the
history of the United States navy.
Mr. Lewis, in addition to his posi-
tion as secretary of the Navy league,
is also mayor of Lake Forest, Ill. He
has traveled extensively in Russia an,
in 1913 was offered a position by
President Wilson as secretary to the
ambassador to that country, but re-,
fused because he was at the time en-1
gaged abroad in studying European
governmental institutions.
J-LITS HOLD ANNUAL FALL
SMOKER AT MICHIGAN UNION
Good speakers, smokes, eats, andc
cider made their appearance at the
Union last night with over 100 mem-t
bers of the J-lit class at the juniors';
annual fall smoker.

with the wonderful effects produced
by the action of tornadoes.
The lantern slides used for this lec-
ture were especially prepared for Mr.
Conger's lectures and are furnished by
the United States weather bureau.
Following Mr. Conger's lecture Mr.
George R. Swain of the Latin depart-
ment will give a talk illustrated with
a selection of the best of his collec-
tion of 3,000 slides showing the natural
beauties of the most picturesque parts
of the United States and Canada. 'A'
large number of the slides are made
from photographs taken by Mr. Swain
while on a 450-mile tramp along the
route of the Canadian Pacific railway.
Lecture at 8 O'clock.
The entertainment will begin
promptly at 8 o''clock. The tickets
were put on sale Saturday and only
a very few are left. Those who
haven't obtained tickets may obtain
them at the door of University hall
auditorium tomorrow night or from
members of The Michigan Daily staff.
Mr. Conger and Mr. Swain are con-
tributing their services gratis and the
entire proceeds of the entertainment
will go to the Goodfellow fund and
will be given to the local Federation
of Charities. This organization will
spend the money for clothes to be dis-
tributed among the poor children of
Ann Arbor.
Boxes Placed on Campus.
Boxes for money contributions have
been secured and will be placed at
different points around the campus
sometime today. A committee com-
posed of Kemp S. Burge, '17, Robert
McNamee, '17E, and Carl T. Hogan,
'20E, has been at work for several
days preparing the boxes and making
signs which will accompany them ex-
plaining their purpose.
J-LITS TO CHOOSE J-HOP
COMMITTEEMEN AT MEETING
The J-lits will hold a class meeting
this aftei'noon at 4 o'clock in room 101,
Economics building. This will be one
of the most important meetings of the
class this year, as the J-hop commit-
teemen will be chosen.

Candy, Lemonade, Squawkers, and
Ball ons Sold by Women's League
at Ahow in Barbour Gym.
Lemonade, candy, squawkers, bal-
loons, and all that pertains to a real
circus will be on hand Friday after-
noon at the Women's league circus in
Barbour gymnasium. The affair is an-
nual and one of the red-letter events
in the campus calendar.
Plans are being made to make this
year's event larger than ever be-
fore. General admission is ten cents
for league members and 15 cents for
others, and is open to girls of all ages
and boys under 12.
Beginning with a parade in the
gymnasium at 4 o'clock, the fun will
continue until 6 o'clock, the side-
shows running continually during the
two hours. There will also be a fish-
pond where the adventurous may try
their luck, and three performances of
a humorous play will be given at 4:30
5, and 5:30 o'clock, in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall.
Refreshments will be served down-
stairs in a cabaret, for which some of
the best campus talent has been se-
cured.
Marie Macaulay, '18, general chair-
man of the circus, is aided by the fol-
lowing committee: Parade, Grace
Raynsford,'18; tickets, Jeannette Arm-
strong, '17; candy booth, Lois Bennal-
lack, '19; lemonade booth, Hope Keel-
er, '19.
Class stunts are in charge of An-
nette Wood, '17, Nona Myers, '18,
Emily Powell, '19, and Katherine Love-
land, '20.
Aged Laborer Injured by Engine
Bay City, Mich., Dec. 11.-Zephaniah
Baldwin, aged 70, a laborer, is at
Mercyhospital with three ribs broken
in addition to other injuries, the result
of his being hit by a switch engine
while he was picking up. coal ,in the
Michigan Central yards.
Pres. Hutchins Banquets in Chicago
President Harry B. Hutchins has
been invited to attend the banquet of
the Bankers' club of Chicago to be
given in Chicago Saturday, Dec. 16, at
which Mr. Frank Vanderlip, president
of the National City bank of New
York, will be the guest of honor. The
president expects to attend.

NO NEW CASES OF SMALLPOX
University Health Service Continues
to Vaccinate Many
Within the last 48 hours no new,
cases of smallpox have been discov-
ered by the University health service,
yet the number of students desiring
vaccination has increased steadily.
Although there was a slight de-
crease in the number of male vac-
cinations, the number of women vac-
cinated has greatly increased. Yes-
terday the department vaccinated 162
students, making a total of 811 this
fall. Out of this number, 102 were
women.
University administrative author-
ities stated yesterday that there is no
basis for the rumor that the Christ-,
mas vacation will begin next Friday
instead of the following Wednesday,
because of the smallpox "scare."
There is no danger, they stated, and
school will continue in session until
Wednesday night.
Due to an error' it was stated in
Sunday's paper that Naomi M. Sey-
bold, residing at 612 West Huron
street, was sent to the University hos-
pital, instead of Rhea Seybold.
T-Square Society Iolds Initiation
The T-Square society will initiate
three candidates tonight. They are:
Delight Sweney, '19, Mrs. Mary Un-
derwood, '19, Marian Christie, '20.

MAY "OIaLLOW BRITISHI PLAN
SMALL COUNCIL FOR WAR
PURPOSES
SEEGENERAL RECONSTRUCTI
Germans Continue to Advance
Eastern Front While West Is
Comparatively Quiet
Washington, Dec. 11.- Premier I
and has begun the formation of a r
French cabinet, Ambassador Sha
cabled the state department this a
ernoon. An earlier cablegram s
Premier 3riand had tendered his-
signation to President Poincare, ani
had been refused. The later mess
said in effect:
"Premier Briand is reforming
cabinet. I was misinformed regard
his resignation."
Newspapers today confidently p
dicted that Premier Briand will .
only fallow the general lines of E
land's reconstruction of governme
Oat will actually form a war council
five members exactly similar to LO
George's compact board of direct
for the war. The shake-up will pr
ably extend throughout the civilian
ganization of government, in all
partments and branches. Whet
it will also combine a change in
military branch is not known.
Today's War Moves ,
Greece occupied most inter
among European diplomats and mil
arists today. Apparently the, all
have served an ultimatum on t
king, demanding complete demobili
tion and in the meantime the is
arch is attempting to communici
with Berlin. He has lodged prot
against the allied blockade.
In Roumania Berlin claims cont
ued advance of the Teutonic coluni
despite unfavorable weather and c
ture of thousands of prisoners.
Petrograd reports recapture
Roumanians of a position which tt
lost Saturday on the road from Plo
ti to Mizilu.
Sofia said Bulgarian forces h
crossed the Danube near Silistria a
captured the Roumanian town of K
apasi, Taking of the western bri
head at Cernavodo was also repor
in this statement.
Bitter Fighting in Carpathians
Both Petrograd and Berlin repo
indicate bitter fighting still in progri
along the Carpathians. "Severe she
ing" vas the language Berlin m
use of in describing unsuccess
Franco-Serbian attacks on the Ma
donian front.
Sofia said the enemy had been fo
ed back several hundred feet west
Sudohol. The weather is still 1
along the western front. Paris
ports intermittent firing. Berlin cla
destruction of parts of trench pc
tions by mine operations.
Canadian Club to Eat Tonight at
Members of the Canadian club v
hold a dinner at the Delta at 6 o'clc
this evening. Dean A. H. Lloyd
the graduate department and Dr. R.
Howell of the dental department v
be present at the banquet and v
give talks.
New Form of Government for C
The charter revision committee
the city council has received a c
of Port Huron's charter, which hai
commission form of government. 'I
question of whether Ann Arbor v
have the same form of governmi
or not, will come up before the vot

of this city next spring.

"The order of the governor gener-
al at Brussels on May 15 last, punish-,
es with prison confinement' or forced
employment of persons who enjoy
public charity, and nevertheless refuse
to accept or continue to work, cor-
responding to their ability.
"This is by no means contrary to
international law, since paragraph 43
of the Hague land war orders, ob-
liges the occupying power to maintain
public order, and if the country's laws
are insufficient for this purpose, to
issue additional orders. 'Public ord-
er' without doubt implies that able
bodied persons, as far as possible, do
not impose themselves on public
charity.
No Scenes of Terror
"Since work is scarce in Belgium, a
large number of Belgian 'workmen
(Continued on Page Six.)

Captain-elect "Pat" Smith of the
1917 Varsity football squad led the
speakers with an appeal that the stu-
dent body get behind the teams on
the field, be they winning or losing.
Mr. Lyman Bryson of the rhetoric
faculty urged that Michigan students
attempt to get the right sort of
men to come to Michigan, men who
can do some constructive work for the
University.
Prof. J. R. Brumm, also of the
rhetori department, told the juniors
to have confidence in themselves when
they go out in the world, as this is the
most material factor in achieving suc-
cess.
Owen Watts, president of the class,
also spoke, while Frank Grover gave
two songs. Music was furnished by
some of Ike Fisher's best. Thomas
McAllister was chairman of the even-
ing.
Prof. It. X. Wenley Gives Lectures
Under the auspices of the Univer-
sity extension department, Prof. R. M.
Wenley will visit this week the Cad-
illac circuit, including Cadillac, Tra-
verse City and Frankfort, Mich.,,where
he will deliver lectures on the fol-
lowing subects: "Changing America,"
"The Pleasures of Reading," and "The
'Relation of Philosophy to Life."

F I

Fre

deriC C. H
U. S. Commlhsion of Immigratlon
Speaks on

o'we

"After the War-What?"

University Hall

8:00 P. M.

TO-NIGHT
Adm. 15c

Under auspices of Intercollegiate Socialist Society.

i

U

t

DON'T

MISS

T HAT

Hill

Christmas.
OF T H E

Concert

Fri. Dec. 1

25c

GLEE

AND

MANDOLIN

CLUB

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