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December 10, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-10

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UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
TIH E ONLY MORNiNG PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

- - .,

VOL. XXVIL No. 60.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DEJCEMBER 10, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

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ACCIDENT HELPS
GERMANS IN EAST
Victory In Battle of Argesul, Key to
Bucharest, in Measure Due'to
Discovery of Orders

CHECKMATES RELIEF

SCHEMEJ

BULLE TIN.
Amsterdam, Dec. 9.-Greece has
notified the entente powers that
she will make no further conces-
sions to them, and that the gov-
ernment will regard any further
demands as cause for war, ac-
cording to the Budapest newspaper
Az Eist.
By Carl W. Ackerman
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Berlin, Dec. 9.-Victory of the bat-
tle of the Argesul which made certain
the fall of Bucharest, was in measure
made possible by the lermans ac-
cidentally discovering battle orders of
the Roumanian general army staff be-
fore those same orders had reached
the Roumanian officers.
At the beginning of General von
Falkenhayn's offejisive, when the Ger-
mans threatened the Roumanian first
army at the Red Tower pass, the Rou-
manians sent a French aeroplane from
Predeal pass carrying orders to this
first army, and notifying them that
the second Roumanian army was
marching to their assistance. The
aeroplane was shot down and the or-
ders captured.
Falkenhayn Checkmates Relief.
From Kronstadt Falkenhayn then
checkmated the R'oumanian relief
scheme by attacking the enemy in the
rear. An Austrian captive translated
the document of four typewritten
sheets into German, and found it cov-
ered all the plans whereby the Rou-
manians were to attempt the defeat of
Field 'Marshal von Mackensen south
of Bucharest. The text of the orders
was immediately communicated to all
German commanders.
Cavalry Ten Miles from Bucharest.
Von Mackensen's cavalry was- at
that moment within ten miles of Bu-
charest and German heavy artillery
for the siege of the capital was mov-
ing forward. At the chief of staff's of-
fice a war map was hung. On it every
move of the army as reported by tele-
graph and -telephone was immediately
marked. The Roumanians had ex-
pected to strike from Bucharest toward
the Danube, cutting von Mackensen's
army in two, and then planned a
stroke westward into von Falken-
hayn's forces.
J-LITS HOLD SMOKER TOMORROW
Mr. Lyman Bryson to Address Juniors
at Union at 7:30 O'clock
With all the cider on the tables ready
for extravagant consumption, and
smokes in abundance to make the haze
of dear old college days, all arrange-
ments are now in order, for the an-
nual fall smoker of the junior lit class
in the Union tomorrow night at 7:30
o'clock.
Mr. Lyman Bryson of the journalism
department will inject a little of the
Michigan spirit into the assembled
juniors with a lively speech on mat-
ters of campus importance. Varsity
Football Captain-elect Cedric C. Smith
will give a short outline of the pros-
pects of the team for next year; Owen
Watts, president of the class, will ad-
dress the smoker on the social and
business program for the ensuing
year; WilliamBrown, manager of the
class fpotball team, will review the
fights of the winning team, and award
the numerals to his men. William Dar-
nall, manager of the basketball squad,
will make the season's announcements
for the coming season, and Karl Weh-
meyer and David Pence, managers of
the baseball and track teams, respec-
tively, will give the plans for their
teams for the approaching games.
Frank Grover of Michigan Union
opera fame will give a novelty act and
Ike Fisher's orchestra will furnish the

music during the evening.
Brumm to Speak to Freshmen Monday
Now that the mid-semesters are
upon them with all their fury, the
freshmen will have ample cause to
Mock to their second assembly and
listen to words of wisdom and warning
from Prof. John R. Brumm tomorrow
afternoon. Professor Brumm spoke
before the assembly last year, and
emerged such a favorite that he has

Freshmen Guests
at Annual Spread
Nine [undred University Women Pre.
lent at Yearly Affair; Mrs.
Hatchins Receives
About 900 university women joined
in the thirty-sixth annual freshman
spread held in Barbour gymnasium
last evening, at which the sophomores
acted as hostesses for the recently ar-
rived women members of the Univer-
sity and their upperclass escorts.
Refreshmnents were served in relays
in the dining room, so that only a part
of the guests were on the floor at any
one time. During the favor dance,
uppercass women were banished to
the gallery while each sophomore pre-
sented her freshman with a green pa-
per cap.
The guests were received by Mrs.
H. B. Hutchins, Mrs. J. E. Beal, Dean
Myra B. Jordan, and the wives of the
deans of the various schools and col-
leges, assisted by Hazel Beckwith, '19,
and Jean Maclennan, '19. The grand
march, officially opening the spread,
was participated in by all the univer-
sity women, who after circling the
gymnasium in columns of fours formed
the block "M."
FIND ONE NEWI CAS Of
SMALLPOX IN ANN ARBOR
Illness of Naomi . Seybold Makes
Total of Seven Patients
in City
One more case of smallpox was dis-
covered by Health Officer Wessinger
yesterday, making a total of seven
persons stricken with the disease in
Ann Arbor. The University health
service vaccinated 152 students yes-
terday morning, establishing a record
.umber of. calls In the history of the
department.
As the result of a thorough combing
9f the city for smallpox cases, Dr. J.
A. Wessinger discovered that Naomi
. Seybold, 612 West Huron street,
Fias the disease and sent her to the
hospital.
There are several suspected cases,
"believed to have been communicated
by patients already quarantined, un-
ier surveillance, but Health Officer
Wessinger said that it would be sev-
-ral days before the fact could be as-
certained. All chickenpox cases are
being carefully watched and every pre-
caution is being made to prevent the
spread of the disease.
There were 152 vaccinations, includ-
Ing women students, yesterday morn-
ing, which greatly surpassed the num-
ber treated Friday. The total num-
her of innoculations by the health
service this fall totals 650. The de-
partment has made additional prepara-
tions to handle the rush for vaccina-
ion students in the University are
:stricken with smallpox, although there
nave been contrary rumors. Vaccina-
tion doesn't make a person absolutely
Immune from the disease, and students
are advised not to visit the districts
where smallpox is known to exist.
,KEYSTONE CLUB PLANS FOR
SPECIAL TRAINS CHRISTMAS1
The Keystone club has made ar-
rangements for the following trains on
-Wednesday,'Dec. 20. There will be a
reduced rate for men going to Pitts-

burg on the afternoon train over the
Pennsylvania lines, and a party rate
for those going by way of Ashtabula,
or Erie leaving Ann Arbor at either
11:30 o'clock in the morning or 7:30
o'clock at night.
There will also be the usual special
Pullman to Pittsburg, connecting with
the 7:23 o'clock Ann Arbor train and
arriving in Pittsburg at 6:30 o'nlock
the following morning. All students
interested should call Burdette Glenn
-t 1422-M or 1857.

Dr. Charles E. Jefferson to Lecture
Union Services Under Auspices
of Wesleyan Guild

atI

TO TALK ON "WORLD WORKERS"
Dr. Charles E. Jefferson, pastor of
the Broadway Tabernacle of New
York city, and noted peae-e advocate,
will lecture on "World Workers" at
7:30 o'clock tonight. The different
churches of the city have combined
and the congregations will meet in
Hill auditorium for the union services.
Dr. Jefferson is a prominent orator
and lecturer, having lectured before
most of the important universitiesI
and colleges of the United States. He
spoke in Ann Arbor last year in the
Methodist church and he won suchI
approval that the Wesleyan Guild im-i
mediately re-engaged him for this
year.
The noted peace advocate is a grad-
uate of Ohio Wesleyan College and
Boston University and has honorary
degrees from Yale, Oberlin, and other
prominent universities of the coun-
try, and is the author of more than 15
books.
The University chorus has been se-
cured by the officials in charge of the
lecture. It will render "Agnus Dei,"
by Widor. Prof. A. A. Stanley of the$
School of Music, will lead the chorus.
Prof. Thomas Trueblood of the ora-
tory department, is entertaining Doctor
Jefferson while in this city. The}
speaker was a pupil of Professor True-
blood at Ohio Wesleyan a number of
years ago.
RAILROAD COMMISSION IN
FAVOR OF REORGANIZATION
Lansing, Mich., Dec. 9.-The MIchi-
gan railroad commission has finally
approved the reorganization plan ofr
the Pere Marquette railroad. While
there are some changes from the tenta-
tive plan approved some time ago, the
sum total of capitalization under theE
reorganization remains $105,000,000.
The principal change is an increase in
the fixed charges.
F. C. Smith, investigator for the in-
terstate commerce commission, is on
his way to Lansing to enter into the
coal shortage inquiry begun this week.
FACULTY GIVEN PRIVILEGES
FOR USE OF REMODELED GYM
In planning for the use of the gym-
nasium the faculty is not being over-
looked. Special lockers, a portion of
the shower, handball, and basketb.l1
courts in the east end of the building,
and gymnasium apparatus have been,
assigned for the exclusive use of mem-
bers of the faculty. The parts of the
gym devoted to their use will be open
every Tuesday and Thursday evening
from 7 to 9 o'clock.

First cast-tryouts for the 1917 Un-
ion opera will be held in the Alpha
Nu rooms, University hall, at 7 o'clock
Wednesday evening, at which time
the preliminary selection of cast ma-
terial will be made. The men will be
judged by a committee composed of
Professors H. A. Kenyon, J. R. Brumin,
Mr. Earl V. Moore, Arthur Schupp
'17E, and Morrison Wood, '17. Those
I trying out will be judged principally
on their stage presence, voice and
dancing ability.
It is the plan of the judging com-
mittee to select a number of men for
each part, and an assignment of lines
and other material will be given them.
Directly after the holidays another
tryout will be held, at which time
Director Morgan will be on hand to as-
sist in further work.
Owing to the large number of cast
parts to be filled, and the exceptional
E chances offered in the feminine and
comedy roles, it is expected that a
l'arger number of men will try out
than ever before. It is urged also
that all men who have any talent in
any line whatsoever, attend the try-
out, in view of the various types of
characters the opera calls for this
year.
This year the opera troupe will
make a week's trip, probably during
spring vacation, visiting such cities
as Chicago and Detroit and possibly
a few cities in the east. The trip en-
gagements have not been announced
as yet.
Those intending to try out for cast
parts are urged to make some prepar-
ation in the line of dialogue, songs, or
dances.
WENLEY TO ADDRESS MENORAH
Will Talk to Society on "Some Com-
mon Elements of ReUgioen"
Prof. Robert Mark Wenley, of the
philosophy department, will address
the Michigan Menorah society at its
meeting tonight at 8 o'clock, in New-
berry hall on "Some Common Ele-
ments of Religion." Professer Wenley
will be remembered by Menorah mem-
bers for his very 'nteresting address
on "Horizons" delivered before the
society two years ago.
As is the usual custom, a discussion
of Professor Wenley's talk will take
place before the close of the meeting.
This meeting, as are all other meet-
m ings of the society, is open to all who
desire to attend.
The last regular program meeting
of the first semester will take place
on Sunday evening, Jan. 7, 1917, at
which time Isadore Levin, professor
of torts in the University of Detroit,
and a recent graduate of the Harvard
law school, will address the society.

EMINENT PASTOR
TO' SPEAK TONIGHT

Hold First Cast
Trials Wednesday
Many Positions Open for This Year's
Opera Which Will Make Trip
During Spring Vacation

.1111 THEODORE HA\RRISON
Director of the Glee Cilib
'COMBINED CLUBS HOLD
CONCERTDECEMBER 16
Success of Musical Organizations This
Year Due Largely to Theo-
dore Harrison
When the Michigan Glee and Man-
dolin club gives their big Christmas
concert Friday night, Dec. 15, they
will do one of the biggest things ever
attempted by any college musical club
in their presentation of the wonder-
fully inspiring "Omnipotence" of Franz
Schubert, with Horace Davis, '17, sing-
ing the solo part.
Such an achievement shows marked
progress under the direction of Theo-
dore Harrison of the School of Music,
and speaks greatly for the versatility
of the clubs, which can do this in one
minute, and change to "Schnieder's
Band" a minute later. Besides these,
another fine number that the Glee
club have been working on for a long
time is the "Toreador Song," from
"Carmen," for the whole club and
Chase Sikes, '16, as soloist. Sikes will
also do the solo in "Stille Nacht," the
old German Christmas carol, without
which no Christmas concert is com-
plete.
The club will not only confine itself
to the more sober productions, but will
also burst forth with the latest "rag"
hits done in the irresistible sweeping
melody style of popular music. For
this part of the evening the Midnight
Sons quartet and the Varsity quartet
will conspire to make the occasion one
of "linked sweetness, long drawn out."
Such a combination as Davis, Grover,
Dieterle, and Carlson would be dif-
ficult to find in another musical or-
ganization.
The unusual ability and versatility
of the organization may be entirely
attributed to the careful and excellent
direction of Mr. Harrison, who has de-
voted the greatest energy, and almost,
all of his time during the past two
months to bring the club into the
best shape possible. Working in con-
junction with him has been Mr. Earl
Moore, and the showing of the club
last year and the proficient manner
in which the affairs have been directed
this year are due to the untiring ef-
forts of these two men.
On account of the high caliber of
the men composing the Mandolin club
this year, it has been possible to un-
dertake many numbers which hereto-
fore have been passed by. The "Marche
Militaire," by Schubert, has been tran-
scribed so effectively for the piano-
forte, and is being made so popular
by orchestras, that it is being under-
taken by the club.

BOARD IN, CONTROL OF ATHLETICS
ASSURES BASKETBALL AS VRSITY
SPORT IN COLLEGE YEARH117-1818

l'ASSES FAVORABLY ON STUDENT
PETITION AT MEETING
YESTERDAY
GYM WILL HOLD 2,500 SAFELY
m on for Waiting Another Season to
Gve Opportunity to Arrange
Adequate Schedule
Michigan is to have Varsity basket-
ball.
At a meeting of the athletic board
held yesterday afternoon action was
'taken upon the petition requesting
that basketball be made a major sport
at Michigan, with a favorable result.
it was stated last night by a mem-
ber of the board in control that the
body was practically unanimous in
favoring basketball as a Varsity sport,
but that it appeared expedient to qual-
ify the granting of the petition with
the proviso that no schedule be at-
tempted until the season following
3916-17. Thus Varsity basketball is
assured, but no games will be played
by a Wolverine team this season.
The reason for making no effort to
arrange any contests this year is, ac-
cording to the statement, that it is too
late in the year o make out a work-
able schedule. It would be practically
impossible to get games at this time
and the difficulties attending such a
project are easily evident.
Competition Not Yet I~iown
On the other hand, plans may now
be formulated for a practicable, good
schedule for next year, and the athletic
association will have ample time to
make the necessary arrangements
From just what quarter the future
competition may be expected, is not
yet known.
O'er 1,700 names were appended to
the petition as presented to the board
for its consideration. More would
doubtless have been added had more
time been allowed for signatures to
accumulate.
The attitude of the campus was ex-
pressed first through the opinions of
prominent members of the faculty,
students, and men in close touch with
university athletics. Both sides of the
'luestion, with their respective argu-
ments, were presented for the consid-
eration of the individual student+ by
the statements of the men who gave
their ideas. The formal petition gave
the mass of the student body the op-
portunity to indicate its stand on he
matter.
SWPt. Flook Makes Statement.
With reference to the capacity of
the gymnasium, Superintendent L. R.
Flook of the university buildings and
grounds department made the follow-
ing statement last night:
"The gymnasium as it now stands is
capable of holding as large a crowd
as can comfortably see a basketball
game. Chief Andrews of the Ann Ar-
bor fire department went over the
building with me this morning and
stated that it could accommodate 2,'500
people with safety.
"The fact that I wish to bring out
is that the gymnasium at present is
not completed and probably will not
me for a few years. The wing con-
taining the Varsity rooms and athletic
offices will add two more exits to
those already in use. When this ad-
dition is ready, a crowd of as many as
31000 or 4,000 could probably be han-
dled in the gymnasium."
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS TO
TALK BEFORE HINDU BODY

President Harry B. Hutchins will de-
liver a short address before the new
Hindu society formed to promote edu-
cation in India, at 7 o'clock Friday
night in room 248 Engineering build-
ing.
The immigration bill which has
passed the house of representatives
and is now before the senate, will be
discussed in so far as it affects Hindu
students entering this country. Reso-
lutions will be drawn up and sent to
congress.
Dr. N. S. Hardikar, as president of
the Hindustan Association of America,
has already filed, a protest with Presi-
dent Wilson against the bill.

Presbyterian Church
HURON aad DIVISION STS.
10:30 A. M.-Leonard A. Barrett. Theme: What's the Matter with the
Church?
Noon-Bible Class for University 'women. Prof. Thos. E. Rankin.
Bible Class for University Men. Prof. Theo. R. Running.
Young Peoples Meeting, 6:30 P. M.Y
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WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
CHARLES E. JEFFERSON
Pastor of the Broadway Tabernacle Church, New York City
SUBJECT:.-WORLD WORKERS
To-night-HILL AUDITORIUM--To-night

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7:30

Union Service

'6

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Lv. A. A.
" Detroit
i Saginaw
Bay City

3:30 P.M.,
4:45 "
8:00
8:30

Dec. 20th.

" Cheboygan 1:45 A.M., Dec. 21st
Mackinaw City 2:15
" St. Ignace 4:00 "
Trout Lake 5:00 "
Ar. Manistique 1:15 P.M.

U Po CUB
SPECIAL
Neil G. Andrew, '18B, Manager
Phone 1328

Ar. Sault Ste. Marie
Lv. Newberry
Marquette
Ishpeming
Houghton
Ar. Calumet

10:25 A.M.
5:55 A M.
9:00 f!
10:10 ":
1:00 P.M.

Dec. 21st.

1:50 ",

Stops at intermediate points upon request.'

1

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