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December 08, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-08

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. _ f I

THE WEATHER
FOR ANN ARBOR-
EBIJPAY-SNOW AND.
COOLER

I

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r '
"Nmh

... " "

LY

UNITED PRESS WIF
1)AY AND NIGHT SERVICI
TIlE ONLY MORNING PAPER
ANN ARBOR

VOL. XXVII. No. 58.

ANN A RBOR MICHIGAN, iRi FAY. IIE(1ER 8. 1916.

PRICE FIVE

)XMAS GOODFELLOW
CAMPAIGN WILL BE
aINAUGUTED SOON
MOVEMENT TO PROVIDE CHEER
FOR ANN ARBOR'S POOR
SET ON FOOT
SLOGAN IS "CLOTHE A CHILD"
Fraternities, Sororities, and Campus
Societies to help Bring Joy
to Youngsters
' Michigan's annual "Goodfellow Cam-
paign" to brighten Christmas for Ann
Arbor's poor has begun and the scale
upon which the movement will be car-
ried on indicates that the results will
far exceed those attained last year.
The local movement is only a part of
a nation-wide effort to alleviate the
suffering which present economic
conditions have brought about.
Every campus organization, includ-
ing the fraternities, sororities, and
house clubs has been enlisted to help
the campaign. The work among the
women of the University is already far
advanced, and during the short time
which remains before the holidays, the
men's organizations will be concen-
trated upon.
Next Wednesday evening a stere-
optican entertainment will be given in
University hall, the proceeds of which
will go to the big fund that is being
raised. "Picturesque America" is the
title of the two illustrated lectures
that will be given, one by Norman B.
Conger of the Detroit weather bureau,
and the other by Mr. George R. Swain
of this city. Tickets to the entertain-
ment will be placed on sale Saturday
and may be bought from members of
the staff of The Daily and others
whose names will be announced later.
"Clothe a Child" Slogan.
"Clothe a Child" will be one slogan
of the local goodfellow movement. The
greater part of the local fraternities
and sororities as well as the campus
societies have already considered
plans for providing a complete outfit
of clothes for at least one child from
Ann Arbor's poor, as well as treating
the "kiddie" to a Christmas . "feed."
Letters explaining the manner in
which this part of the movement is be-
ing carried on have been sent out.
Early next week a committee of stu-
dents will collect old clothes and shoes
which will be disposed of by the Fed-
erated Charities.
Verne E. Burnett, '17, is general
chairman of the student campaign. He
will be assisted by Clarence T. Fish-
leigh, '17E, Edward B. Palmer, '17,
Kemp S. Burge, 17, H. Leslie Carroll,
'17E, John C. B. Parker, '17, and
Cedric C: Smith, '18. Leland S. Thomp-
son, '18, will handle the publicity. All
communications should be addressed
to "The Goodfellow Editor of The
Michigan Daily."
The co-operation of the Federated
Charities is being directed by Mrs. W.D.
Henderson, wife of Professor Hender-
son of the physics department. Con-
tributions of money are earnestly so-
licited and its expenditure will be un-
der the direction of the Federated
Charities. The progress of the cam-
paign will be followed by The Daily.
WANT TO EX-AMINE MUNITIONS
IMPORTATIONS INTO MEXICO

Washington, Dec. 7.-Representative
Kahn of California today introduced a
resolution calling for appointment of
nine representatives to investigate
"the character and extent of arms and
munitions importations into Mexico,
and to find the extent and character of
importations from Mexico of money,
goods, wares, and merchandise stolen
or confiscated from residents of Mexi-
co by members of armed Mexican
forces."

HO

USEMES SAY THEY 'Sgn Up for Varsity Baskerball
This h7orning From 9 To 12 o 'Clock

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President of Local Womens Organiza-
tion States Boycott Rests
on Investigation
"There is no intention on our part
to proceed against the local grocers,"
said Mrs. Edouard Richar, president of
the Ann Arbor Housewives' league,
when told of the stand taken by two
local grocers against a possible boy-
cott on food supplies. "We are unde-
cided on the question of the boycott,"
said Mrs. Richar, "and at present are
investigating purely and simply.
"We hope a boycott will be unneces-
sary and we will always 'take the
merchants' viewpoint into considera-
tion. We have communicated with the
Housewives' leagues of Detroit and
Toledo asking about the methods they
are employing to bring down prices.
State Deputy Food Inspector Willam
J. Mickle is 'in receipt of our letter
asking for his support and approval
and any information which he may be
able to give us on the subject. We
will also communicate with the na-
tional secretary of the Housewives'
league and ask to be admitted into the
national association.
"We are going to foster the organ-
ization of a Housewives' league in
Ypsilanti, Chelsea, and Dexter, so
that the county of Washtenaw may be
fully represented."
Representatives for every ward of
the city with the execption of the
Fourth ward have been appointed to
the executive board. These include
Mrs. Frank E. Royce, First ward; Mrs.
J. J. Biederman, Second ward; Mrs.
Flora Scott, Third ward; Mrs. Fre-
mont Ward, Fifth ward; Mrs. Ellis
Walker, Sixth ward, and Mrs. G. W.
Parry, Seventh ward.
A corresponding-secretary and a
treasurer will be chosen at the next
meeting of the league, Wednesday,
Dec. 13, in the city hall.
01" CONCERT 1CO31ITTE ME l N
.: ee (ub ,sitertsainxaent Next Wo k
to lie Followed by Dance
in Gynmnasium
The committees in charge of the
Christmas concert to be given by the
University Glee nnd Mandolin club,
Friday, Dec. 15, have been announced
by the general chairman, E. C.
Sclhtcht, '1SE. The price of the tick-
ets for this performance will be 25
cents and may be had from any mem-
ber of the committee, and from Wahr's
and Sheehan's bookstores.
Advertising committee: Chairman,
H. K. White, '17; N. H. Ibsen, '18E;
P. C. Emery, '18; J. E. Robinson. '19.
Publicity committee: Chairman, A. D.
Rathbone, '19; T. F. McAllister, '18.,
Auditorium committee: Chairman, W.
S. Dinwiddie, '18E; B. Howard, '19; A.
McCormick, '19. Ticket committee:
Chairman, G. C. Mack, '18; C. T. Van
Dusen, '19E; C. C. Pearce, '19E; M. S.
Towar, '19. Campus ticket committee:
Chairman, C. W. Fisher, '18. Local
ticket conImittee Chairman, H. A.
Gustin, '18; C. R. 'owley, '19; W. W.
Duemling, '20.
Tickets for the dance to be held in
Barbour gymnasium after the con-
cert may be had at the Union Iu'-
ton's, and the Buss Bee at the prie
of $1.00. The floor of the gymnasim
is in good condition, and the dance
will begin at 9- o'clock Ike Fisher's

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S' IlETilTION FOR VARSITY
B!SKETBALL AT ANY ONE
OF THESE PLACES:
DENTAL BUILDING,
LAW BUILDING,
ENGINEERINC BUILDING,
LIBRARY,
UNIVERSITY- HALL,
NEW SCIENCE BUILDING,
CHEMISTRY BUILDING,
IOMEOIP HOSPITAL,
GENERAL HOSPITAL,
MEDICAL BUILDING.

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* * * r" * * * * * * * * * *
From 9 till 12 o'clock this morning
the student body will have an oppor-
'tunity to express its desire for a
Varsity basketball team by signing a
petition which will be presented to the
board in control of athletics at its next
meeting. Places where the petition
may be signed are given above.
The petition will read: We, the un-
dersigned, respectifully petition that
basketball be instituted at Michigan
as a major sport.
This petition is the outcome of the
expressions of need and desire for a
Varsity basketball team, voiced by
prominent men on the campus and
seemingly the feeling of the great
mass of the student body. The main
reason for submitting such a petition
for the signatures of students lies in
the fact that it is apparently the de-
sire of the campus to see a Varsity
basketball team. Another is that some
Varsiy sport is needed to keep alive
the fighting spirit between the close of
the football season and the opening of
the spring athletic seasons.
Other reasons are: That by having
basketball as a major sport, men who
are ambitious to perform in more than
one branch of athletics will have a

further inducement to attend the Uni-
versity and valuable material may
thus be added to Michigan's list of
athletes; that the addition of another
Varsity sport would add to Michigan's
prestige and help in her relations with
other institutions by enabling this Uni-
versity to meet rivals in more than
one branch of sport; that interest in
basketball has been evinced by the
campus in interelass tournaments,
shown by the fact that a larger numa-
her of teams and candidates report
for this sport than for any other con-
ducted by the intramural department;
that this year new fraternity and
boarding house leagues have been in-
augurated; that the new gymnasium
affords a place for contests; that it
would not interfere in any marked de-
gree with other sport as its season
would begin after football is over, and
before the spring track and baseball
seasons open, and that good competi-
tion may be found, if not the first year,
later.
Some of the reasons for not making
basketball a major sport are: Basket-
ball is generally coasidered not a pay-
ing sport; there is a question as to
where Michigan would look for games
and natural rivals; it might interfere
with Varsity track in iaking some of
the cinder men away during the indoor
season; it would require some expense
and that might better be employed
in building up present sports like
track that are not on as firm a founda-
tion as might be desired; one man,
'annot do well in more than one event,
ind the presence of two-sport men
would not be such a great advantage
in that account; eastern schools will,
not come west for games; and is it
practicable?
If' the student thinks Michigan
should have Varsity basketball, signj
'the petition, and if not, do not sign.

BAUMGARTH APPOINTED FALL MICHIGANENSIAN

GERMANS SMASH FIERCE
ATTACS FROM RUSSIANS
Balfour, of the Admiralty, Expected
to be Member of Lloyd-George's
Coalition Cabinet
Sofia, Dec. 7.-The smashing of des-l
perate Russo-Roumanian attacks and
occupancy of the bridge head near Co-
pacevistaivan was announced today.
Russian and Roumanian forces strove
desperately in attacks on the lower
course of the Arges river in Wallachia,
but were beaten back. Many of the
Arges bridges were destroyed but the
Bulgarian forces forded the river near
Copacevistaivan and took the bridge
ah'ead- i
Balfour in Lloyd-George Cabinet£
London. Dec. 7.-It was stated on1
=ood authority late today that Arthur
J. Balfour, first lord of the admiralty
under the coalition regime, will be a'
member of of the Lloyd-George cabi-
net. because otherwise the unionists
would refuse support to the new min-l
4Jry. It is reported the labor party
nad decided by a small majority to1
support Lloyd-George on his asur-
ances of a favorable legislation at a
later date.
Great Rejoicing in Berlin
Berlin, Dec. 7. -Great rejoicing en-
sued here last night following the an-
nouncement of the fall of Bucharest1
and Ploesti. Enormous crowds as-t
sembled in the streets and sang the
national anthem. Editorially all news-'
papers today expressed satisfaction
that "a faithless ally received a
speedy punishment," and regretted!
that Bratianu, the Roumanian prime
minister and his "accomplices," were
not captured.t
"The fate of Roumania may be con-
sidered as sealed," the newspapers
declared, "since what remains of the
coantry can definitely be considered
as i'issian territory."
PURPOSE OF MILITARY CORPS
EXPLAINED BY MEN IN CHARGE1
Frequent requests to explain the na-
ture and purpose of the University of
Michigan military training corps has
led the men in charge of the move-
ment to make a statement clearing up
these points.1
The corps is purely a university or-
ganization for men. It has no affilia-
tions with the government and its pur-
pose is to teach the duties of a good
soldier. The organization meets every
Wednesday night at 7 o'clock in Wa-
terman gymnasium and drilling is in
order until 8:45. By next week it is
expected to have 150 men in te corps,
providing for the formation of two
companies.
A thorough course in military
science is being planned and later an
army officer may be obtained. There
are no expenses attached to the organ-
ization, and the question of uniforms is
still undecided.
Anyone desiring further information
or wishing to join the corps can com-
municate with M. H. Schermer, '19E,
at 993-J, or Mason Lyons, '19M, at
2303-M.
Crown Prince Jocko in London Zoo
London, Dec. 7.-Crown Prince
Jocko, a monkey which British tars
rescued from a torpedoed banana ship,
has found a place in the London zoo
after participating in the Heligoland

naval battle. He wears a real iron
cross inscribed with the name of the
fight.
Roumanians Join the Alibi Club
London, Dec. 7.-Bucharest and
Polesti were evacuated by the allied
forces in order to shorten the line in
Wallachia, General Maurice, director
of the allied military operations, de-
clared here today.

I" lST MAN
POVZES SUCCESS
AT GIRLS' CONCERT
ELSA APFEL, '17, STAR OF PLAY
GIVEN BY MASQUES IN
AUDITORIUM
GIRLS' GLEE CLUB DOES WELL
Nona Myers, '18, Pleases With Grand
Opera Imitation; Audience
Enthusiastic
"Ain't he great?" cried Miss Ethel-
inda; and this seemed to be the opin-
ion of the audience at the concert
given by the Girls' Glee .club and
Masques last evening in Hill auditor-
ium. "He" was Mr. Woolley of the
"Worsted Man," a part which Elsa
Apfel, '17, took with great credit. Her
interpretation of the part, and the ex-
cellent support given her by the mem-
bers of the cast made the concert one
of the most entertaining that has yet
been seen this year. The bell boy
and "Miss Impatience" were also espe-
cially good.
The numbers given by the Glee club
were well rendered and enthusiastic-
ally received, especially the "Raggle
Taggle Gypsies," and "Aloha," given
with the accompaniment of a ukelele
quartet. The noise made by Nona
Myers, '18, in her grand opera selec-
tion was as nothing compared with the
noise made by the audience after-
wards. "Heilige Nacht," given by the
Sunrise Daughters quartet, met with
approval also. Lucile Johnson, '19,
gave two selections on the harp in her
delightful manner.
The large audience was most en-
thusiastic throughout the whole pro-
gram, and the concert was a decided
success in every way.
Vote Is Light On
Prison Question
Relief Movement Wins Out by Ma.
jority of 154; Committee Gives
Decision Today
Owing to the light vote cast yes-
terday on the resolution that the Uni-
versity of Michigan should join the
nation-wide campaign to raise funds
for the relief work in the prison camps
of Europe, the prison camp committee
will meet today to decide whether the
vote warrants a general campaign.
Of a total of 534 ballots cast, 344
students voted "yes" on the resolu-
tion and 190 voted "no."
Though the balloting was light it
may have been due to the fact that
the time set for voting was too late
for many students to cast their votes
rather than through lack of interest.
At the mass meetiig Wednesday
evening in Hill auditorium, C. W.
Whitehair, secretary of the University
Y. M. C. A. of Cornell, told of the great
need of such work at the present time.
Nearly all of the eastern universities
have aided in the present war, either
in ambulance or "Y" work. Michigan's
student body has done very little for
these movements as yet.
SOUTHERN ORATORY FLOWS AT
KENTUCY CLUBS BANQTFT
Members of the Kentucky club en-
joyed a dinner last night at a local

hostelery, where old-fashioned south-
ern oratory had as prominent a place
upon the program as the delicacies
served. Mr. W. F. Marsteller- of the
economics department was the princi-
pal speaker, his general topic being
"Bringing Better Men to Michigan." A
special car has been arranged to con-
vey the club to the southland for the
Christmas holidays. All men not yet
having signified their intention of join-
ing the party are urged to communi-
cate with Yancey R. Altsheler, '17, at
the earliest possible date.

EDITOR OF INLANDER
Botrd in Control Also Selects Depart-
mental Managers of Michi-
ganensian
At a meeting of the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications held yes-
terday afternoon, E. A. Baumgarth,
17, was appointed to the managing
editoriship of the Inlander, to succeed
F. F. Nesbit, '17-'19L, who resigned be-
cause of the pressure of law work.
Baumgarth is a member of the repor-
torial staff of The Daily, being at
present a hight editor.
The associate editors of the Michi-
ganensian were also appointed at this
time, the following departmental edi-
tors being selected:
Literary, Alice Wieber, '17, and
Stanley Smith, '17; eng.ineering, Rob-
ert L. McNamee, '17E; medical, Bertil
L. Larsen, '17M; dentistry, Walter B.
Steele, '17D; homeopathic, C. B.
Mandeville, '171H; law, Harry B. He-
witt, '17.
This year the dental department has
been given a special representative,
the combined departmental editor be-
ing done away with.
May Refuse Ambassador Passage
Washington, Dec. 7.--Safe conduct
willi not be granted Fuad Bey, pro-
posed Turkish ambassador to the
United States, by the allies unless the
United States makes a direct request

SA T C
Last Chance to Set Year Book at Re.
d need Prfee; Sn bscription ~
Beat Record
With the subseriptions for the 1916-
17 Michiganensian running already far
in advance of those of - all previous
years, it is expected that the result of
today's canvass will still further ad-
vance the total.
Tables will be placed in the Law
building, Economics building, Tappan
hall, and the Library. All students de-
siring to subscribe for the year books
are urged to avail themselves of this'
last opportunity to do so. A deposit'
of 50 cents will be required.
The annual will contain 30 more
pages than appeared in the Michigan-
ensian for last year, and will be filled
with snap-shots of campus celebrities
and subjects of interest to the student
body, work on which has already be-
gun.
Fraternities and clubs will be re-
quired to sign the subscription lists.
for copies of the book. They are re-
quested to do so today. The present
price of the annual is $3.00, which will
bet inereased to $3.50 when placed on
sale on the canpus and at the book
:tores in the spring.
BUTTEII AN) EGG PRICES DROP
IN CHICAGO AFTER BOYCOTT

ten piece o
music and r
ed.
Cardinal A
Washingto
tion" messa
marked this
National Ass
an Suffrage
the right to
all that is
tractive, an
masculine

rchestra will furnish the for it, it was intimated in allied diplo- Chicago, Dec. 7.--Butter and egg
efreshments will be serv- matic circles here today-. prices were on the toboggan here to-
day as the federal grand jury food
---- - Sophomore Mixer Saturday Night probe, and widespread egg and but-
gainst Woman Suffrage Announcement was made yesterday ter boycott by housewives, got under
n, D. 7.-A "condemna- that a mixer for the sophomore class way. Cold storage eggs dropped to 28
ge from. Cardinal Gibbons of the University would be held in the cents today, a decline of two cents
afternoon's session of the Union Saturday evening, Dec. 16 Fish- since yesterday. They have fallen six
;ociation Opposed to Wom- er's orchestra will furnish music for cents this week. Warehouse firms to-
He said insistence on the occasion and an endeavor will be day were discharging candlers because
vote would rob woman of made to secure some prominent fac- 'of the falling off of the consumption
amiable, tender, and at- ilty members as speakers. of eggs, due to boycotts. Best grades
d give her nothing but The mixer will be free to all sopho- of butter fell one and one-half cents
boldness and effrontery. mores who have paid their class dues. a pound today.

TODAY:--

LAST

CHANCE

TO

ORDER

1917

ICF IIC

SIA

LAW

B UILD ING-ECO NO MIC S-T A P P A N

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