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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 07, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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UNITED PRESS WIR
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VOL. XXVII. No. 57.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CE

T

C.W, WHITEH9iR TWO SMALLPOX CASE
URGES STUDENTS E LI ANN ARBOR
Frank Snyder Tries to Escape When
Iv Al1v "Y" IIWIORK Pollee Discover He Has
Disease

"WORSTED MAN"
To MgilE69TIN
HILL AUDITORIUM
GIRLS' LEE AND MASQUES GIVE
COMBINED ENTERTAINMENT
AT 8 O'CLOCK TONIGHT

PAT SMITH WHO flAI)

VARSITY

BUCHAREST CAPTURED BY GERMANSl
ROUMANIAN CAPITOL FALLS BEFORE
'DETERMINED ATTACK OF TEUTOF

SAYS AMERICA TAKES MORE IN-
TEREST IN ATHLETICS THAN
IN WORLD WAR
1200 STUDENTS PRESENT
Students Will Vote Today from 4 to 6
O'clock in Different Buildings
on Campus
"Europe is today a recking, suffer-
ing hospital and weaithy America pays
less attention to the world war than
she does to some athletic event," said
C. W. Whitehair, secretary of the Cor-
nell University Y. M. C A., in his lec-
ture last night in Hill auditorium on
prison camp work in Europe. i,
"One cannot speak lightly of the war
after visiting the various fronts. It
is a war fought by nations, not by
classes, or individuals. The motto of
every country is, 'March on, march on,
to victory or to death.' If crepe were
to hang on every door of France where
a father, a son, or a sweetheart had
been killed, a crepe would hang on all,
the doors of France and nearly every
door in Europe.
"There is suffering everywhere, and
the Y. M. C. A. finds work to do in all
places, but the greatest suffering and
the best opportunity for "Y" work is
found in the prison camps. In these
camps men are herded in thousands,
like cattle in pens. With all the na-
tions doing their utmost to feed and
cloth their men at the fronts one can-
not but expect the worst of condi-
tions in the prison camps.
Monotony Crazes Prisoners.
"In the prison camps the Y. M. C. A.
is carrying on, as ex-Premier Asquith
has said, the most commendable work
of the whole war. The monotony drives
the prisoners crazy and adds mental
su4riing to the physical hardships.
The "Y" has established college
courses of study in many of the camps
and in all of them holds religious serv-
ices, gives lectures, concerts, and
plays, and furnishes a place where
they may write letters or get light re-
freshments."
In concluding, Mr. Whitehair urged
Michigan students to do all within
their power to aid the work, lest it
should be said that America grew
wealthy while Europe suffered.
Miss'Minnie Holzhauser, '13, told of
rthe part the American hospital at
Busrah has taken in caring for the
wounded, In ordinary times the hos-
pital held 60 beds, but as high as 160
patients were accommodated after hos-
tilities began.
About 1,200 people attended the talk.
(Continued on Page Six.)
GLEE CLUB HOLD DANCE DEC. 15
Event Will Follow Christmas Concert;
Fisher's Orchestra to Play
Inaugurating a strictly new feature
connected with the Christmas con-
cert, the University Glee and Mandolin
club will give a dance Friday evening,
Dec. 15, in Barbour gymnasium, direct-
ly following the musical program in
Hill auditorium. The committee in
charge of the dance is as follows:
Chairman, Elbridge Dudley, '18E,
Kemp Keena, '19 lit, Reginald Jeavons,
'19 lit, Frederick Van Brunt, '18E,
Joseph Broderick, '19 lit.
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Harrison,
Prof. C. 3. Vibbert, and Prof. John E.
Enfwiler and Mrs. Enwiler will
chaperon the dance which is to be-
gin at 9 o'clock. ,Ike Fisher will be
present with his orchestra to furnish
the music.
Tickets, which will be one dollar,
will go on sale Monday, Dec. 11, and
the committees in charge of their dis-
tribution will be announced Saturday.

Two additional cases of smallpox
were discovered last night in Ann
Arbor, making a total of five patients
quarantined since the disease made
its appearance in this city.
One of the cases was found in a
peculiar manner. The Ann Arbor po-
lice were sent to the scrap iron fac-
tory to trace several articles that were
alleged to have been stolen. At the
factory the men found Frank Snyder,
whose face bore the marks of small-
pox. The chief of police sent for
Health Officer Dr. John A. Wessinger.
In the meantime, Snyder attempted to
escape, but after a short chase, the
police succeeded in capturing him.
Snyder has been working at the fac-
tory 'for the past week.
Another one of the victims, the 12-
year-old daughter of Fred Brown, pro-
prietor of Brown's cafe, was sent to
the University contageous ward last
night. Miss Brown has been attending
the Christian Mack school, which will
probably be fumigated this afternoon.
Robert Miller, 510 South Fifth street,
was taken to the contageous hospital
Tuesday night' suffering from a seri-
ous attack of smallpox.
Others Contract Disease.
Miss Viola Miller, niece of Robert
Miller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred
W. Williams,,417 West William street,
is suffering from a slight attack. Miss
Miller claims to have contracted the
disease after a visit to her aunt, Mrs.
Robert Miller.
Health Officer Wessinger has traced
the Miller case back over a period of
six weeks. At that time a woman
named Josephine Gaunt visited the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard L.
Vorce, 320 Second street, -for a week.
Two weeks later, Walter Ballard, a
painter rooming at Vorce's home, be-
came ill. He'was very sick for sev-
eral days and eruptions developed.
Cases Called Chickenpox.
At the same time Mrs. Vorce says
she became ill as did her five-year-old
daughter. The cases were pronounced
chickenpox by Dr. T. A. Dillman, ac-
cording to the health officer. At the
request of the family he did not re-
port the cases to the health officer, for
they did not want a sign on the house.
During this time Vorce worked daily
at the plant of the Superior Manufac-
turing company. He was immune from
the disease, having recently been vac-
cinated.
Nearly three weeks ago, Mrs. R. Mil-
ler visited at Vorce's when they were
suffering from smallpox, and went
through a siege similar to that of Mrs.
Vorce and Ballard.
Health Service Warns Students.
Dr. H. H. Cummings of the Univer-
sity health service, issues another
warning for all students who have not
been vaccinated to do so as soon as
possible.
"Vaccination is very mild in effect,"
says Dr. Cummings. "There have only
been 200 students this year who have'
been treated and not one of them have
failed to take or resulted in undue
swelling. The swelling is caused by
infection, caused by the removal of
the guard placed on the vaccination.
Students who are vaccinated by the
service are required to come to the de-
partment two or three times a week to
have the proper attention."

ELSA APFEL, '17 TO PLAY LEAD
Scene of Play Laid in Summer Hotel;
Ten Girls Appear in
Cast
"The Worsted Man" will make his
bow to the public at. 8 o'clock to-
night in Hill auditorium. The Girls'
Glee club and Masques will present
tho entertainment.
Elsa Apfel, '17, is at her best in the
character of susceptible and wobbly
Mr. Woolley, the creation and the tor-
ment of his mentor, Impatience, played
by Inez Gose, '17. The scene is laid
in a summer hotel, where seven lone-
some maidens are waxing desperate
at the dearth of masculine society, and
the outcome is the soft and treacher-
ous Mr. Woolley. The rapid dialogue
is broken by songs with all the famous
Gilbert and Sullivan swing.
The program follows:
"Jolly Winter"...............Vincent
"Amaryllis" (Gavotte).........Parlow
"The Raggle Taggle Gypsies, O!"..
............Old English Folk Song
Girls' Glee club
"Aloha"......Arranged by Sherwood
Florence Paddack, '117, and club,
Gypsy Song ................Schumann
Selections
Sunrise Daughters' Quartet
Selections from Junior Girls' Play,
1915-1916...........Girls' Glee club
Barcarolle..................... Holy
Intermezzo .................. Loukine
Lucile Johnson, '20, harpist
Cast of "The Worsted Man": Mr.
Woolley, the worsted man, a doll and
a flirt, Elsa Apfel, '17; Patience, Inez
Gose, '17; Marianna, Eva Bowen, '18;
Babette, Gladys Whelan, '17; Janette,
Helen Davis, '17; Susanna, Geta
Tucker, '17; Priscilla, Ruth Lenzner,
'17; Prudence, Elaine Tappan, '19;
Ethelinda, Florence Paddack, '17, and
Sambo, Harriet Walker, '17.
M1ICIGANENSIAN SALES POINT
TO LARGE EDITION OF BO
All indications point to this year's
edition of the Michiganensian as being
the largest ever produced. Continued
reports of good sales came in from all
of the tables Wednesday.
The sales management wishes to
emphasise the fact that there are only
two days remaining during which or-
ders will be taken for the book.
The circulation table will be in the
Medical building today, and the table
in the Engineering building will be
discontinued after tomorrow.

DILL ASKS FOR $100,00 ' )*
INTESTIGATE HIGH PRICES
Washington, Dec. 6.-Repre-
sentativeDill today introduced
a resolution asking an appropri-
ation of $100,000 for the attor-
ney general to investigate the
cause of "unreasonable advance"
in prices of foodstuffs, fabrics,
paper, fuel, and clothing, and to
find the differences on prices its
these commodities in transit
from the producer to the con-
sumer. The resolution was re-
ferred to the interstate and for-
eign commerce commission.
* * *4 * * * * * * * * *

CA illit
O F

NEW BALKAN
DRI)VE

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*:
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GERMANS CIRCLE id

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Story on Page Three.
10 GIVE CHRISTMAS MUSIC
( lcoir Conducted ,by Frederick Alexan-
"o Present Program
A concert of Christmans music will
be presented by a choir of mixed
voices, conducted by Mr. Frederick
Alexander, in the Normal concert
course in Ypsilanti, at 8 o'clock to-
night. The music will include Russ-
aun liturgical .music by Gretchyani-
nov; old French (Gevaert); old Eng-
ji!h i(very nysiery plays); "Ave
Maria SclLa." by Grieg; Modern Com-
l.3O1n by Widor, Massenet, Augusta
Hoims Elgar and Leopold Damrosch,
and old nativity hymns played upon
the clavichord.
There will be a special interurban
car leaving Ann Arbor at 7 o'clock, re-
turning immediately after the concert.
Orders Ballots Not to Ide Destroyed
Columbus, Dec. G.---Sceretary of
State AHildebrant today wired to all
election cfficers that no ballots be de-
stroyeci until tu!AhT adv ice. The law
states that the ballots may be de-
destroyed within 30 days after election.
This is the firsts step in a recount
wziich Republicans claim will show the
election of Governor Willis instead of
James Cox. Leaders of the party claim
no fraud but charge there was er-
roneous counting of scratched ballots.

Claims Premier
Change, Mvistake~
Ftranicis N eison Says Lloyl-George's
Election Will Result in
Disaster
"It was a sorry day for England
when Mr. Asquith had to go," said
Francis Neilson, ex-member of parlia-
ment, prefatory to his lecture, "How
Diplomats Make War," which he de-
livered last night in University hall.
Speaking of David Lloyd-George, the
leader of the aggressive forces of the
empire, to whom the premiership will
undoubtedly go, Mr. Neilson said, "I do
not care for him as a Radical and I
cared less for him as a Tory, and if
he comes to the premiership he will
come not as a Radical but as a Tory.
"The acceptance of the premiership
of England by Mr. George will result
in disaster if it leads to the forma-
tion of a conservative government, and
if the overthrow of the cabinet neces-
sitates a general election, many dif-
ficulties may ensue. The mass of peo
pie of England now look upon Lloyd-
George as a Conservative. Whoever
it is that assumes the premiership, it
is certain that it will result in a gen-
eral speeding up of the war."

Victm ok TreutnnIc Forces Declared
War on entral Powers ljnt
Thr ce .MGI ..., Ago
1lerlin, DCec .--Bucharest Eas been
captured by the allied troops of the
Central powiers, a second official state-
ment from the war office announced
.this afternoon. The capture of Bu-
charest completes the first phase of
Germany's new Balkan campaign,
brings another of the Balkan powers
under Teutonic domination and opens
the way for the movement of the Aus-
tro-German forces upon Odessa.
Roumania declared war on the cen-
tral powers only a lttle over three
inontlms ago, Aug. 28. The Rouintanian
army advanced into Transylvania but
were soo busily occupied in resisting
a (determiinJad ttack by the Austro-
German arn:ies. The advance of the
Teutonic forces was sure and steady.
Town after town was captured and the
Roumanians steadily withdrew. For
the past two weeks the Roumanian
army has been in emminent danger
of being entirely surrounded by the
armies of the Teutonic allies advanc-
ing upon them from two sides.
The Roumanian campaign has been
eondunted under the direction of Gen-
eral von Falkenhayn and Field Mar-
shal von Mackensen. Bucharest, the
captured capital, is known as the "ter-
race of the east." It is located en both
sides of the Dimibovitza river which
has been spanned with a half dozen
iron and stone bridges. It was sur-
rounded by a ring of forts. The city

CLAIMS 12 MEN RESPONSIBLE:
New York Commissioner Attribtte
High Prices in That City to
Small Group .
New York, Dec. 6.-Commissioner of7
Weights and Measures Harrigan de-
clared today that investigations made
by him have proved that 12 men are
responsible for high food prices in
New York. He refusedto give these
names, but stated that steps will be
taken to bring them before a federal
grand jury within two .weeks.1
The commission appointed by Gov-
ernor Whitman to investigate food
prices met today in the office of George
W. Perkins, chairman, to affect a per-
manent organization. This was the
day when the housewives of 50 New
York cities are expected to take arms
against the high prices of eggs.
Fifty mayors have called, by procla-
mations, for two eggless weeks in their
respective ,town sand reports indicate
there were more eggless breakfasts in,
this state today than has been in the
case in years.

EMMA GOLDMAN
Last Two Lectures

has a population of upwards of 300,000
Berlin, Dec. 6.--The officIal news
agency this afternoon declared it wa
"officially reported that Bucharest an -
Ploesti had been captured." Ploest
is a railroad junction about 31 miles
due north of Bucharest and on th(
main railroad from the Roumania:
'capital north.
From the wording of the Berlin of-
ficial statement it is not clear whici
of the encircling armies of the Ger-
man advance conquered the Rouman-
ian capital. The Berlin statement:
have mentioned three separate thrusts
at the capital. Of these the southerr
army which crossed the Danube wa:
located in o'micial statements yesterday
at Gradistea, about 11 miles due south
of Bucharest. Probably this was the
closest to the city and it sepims likel:
that this was the army w;hich con
quered the city, according to the Ber
lin official statement.
The Berlin statement earlier in th
day declared that the Ploesti railroac
was the only safe line of retreat fo
the Roumanians. If Ploesti is cap
tured the Roumanian defenders ma
be seriously threatened with complet
separation from all other allied forces
In connection with the conquerin,
of the two Roumanian cities interes
is added to the statement containe
in Carl W. Ackerman's dispatch of tC
day declaring the belief of officers a
the front with Field Marshal, vo
Mackensen that the capture of th
Roumanian capital is merely one ste
in the general German campaign fo
an invasion of Russia, with Odessa
the ultimate goal aimed at by Fiel
Marshal von Hindenberg.
Poetry Club Meets Tonight at 7:3
The Poetry club will hold its firs
meeting of the ye4r in the Cerel
Francais rooms at' 7:30 tonight. Thy
poetry of Francis Thompson will b
discussed, and plans of the club fo
the ensuing year will also be taken ui

Russian Literature (A rtzibasheb)

4:15 P. M.

OP. M.

Education & Sex, a discussion of the Garry System

Dr. BEN L. REITMAN. Chairman

TONIGHT HILL AUDITORIUM
Girls' Glee Club and Masques Entertainment
Find out what the girls can do
25 cents 8:00

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