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December 06, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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FOR ANN ARBOR-
WEDNESDAY-FAIR AND
COLDER

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UNITED PRESS
1)AtY AN t)NIGHT S E R
TILE ONLY MORNING PA
ANN ARBOR

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VOL. XXVIL No. 56.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1916.

PRICE FI

t

STUDENTS GATHER
TONIGHT TO HEAR
ABOUT CAMP WORK.

UNFURL SUFFRAGE
BANNERIN HOUSE
Women Display Four-Foot Flag from
tillery During President's
Message to Congress

Premier Asquith Resigns
London, Dec. 5.-Premier Asq uith officially handed his resignation
to the king today.
Premier Asquith's resignation i believed to be the result of criticism
of his method of prosecuting the war. Asquith was stated to consent to
a revision of the government in order that a more efficient method of
conducting the world situation might be instituted.
In place of the coalition cabinet which has held power until today,
there will in all likelihood be instituted a small war council upon the
theory that this concentration of power will result in better results.

HOUSEWIVES FOE
LEAGUE TO RED!
HIGH LIVI-NG C
75 AI ARBOR WoiE IME
CITY HALT YESTEBDAI
AFTERNOON

1L AUIDITORIUM SCENE
HASS MEETING FOR WAR
SUFFERERS.

OF

PASS OUT PAMPHLETS

LATERI

CAMPUS TO VOTE TOMORROW
Professors Lane and Strauss Express
Their Views of New
Movement
Michigan students will meet tonight
in Hill auditorium to hear C. W.
Whitehair, secetary of the Cornell
University "Y," and Minnie Holz-
hauser, '13, describe the various as-
pects of prison camp work which is
now being carried on in Europe. The
m'leting will begin promptly at 7
o'clock and last one hour.
The object of the big meeting is to
explain to the students a movement to
secure aid for the multitudes of war
sufferers. No contributions will be
asked at this time. Tomorrow a vote
will be taken in which all students
will take part to determine whether
Michigan cares to carry the movement
any further.
In case the vote is favorable the
work of canvassing for funds will be
undertaken under the direction of the
student council aided by other campus
organizations.
Prof. Victor H. Lane of the law
faculty, and Prof. Louis. A. Strauss of
the English department expressed their
views in regard to the meeting, last
night. Professor Lane said, "Every'
student should intefest himself in
the movement."
Professer Strauss expressed himself
as decidedly in favor of the movement.1
He said, "The more the students do
the more good they will get out of the]
movement. Every student should sac-
rifice himself somewhat for a move-t
ment like this."
CIRS' CLUB PRESENTS
VRADENTERTINMENT
. K. Bangs' Comedy, "The Worsted
Man," Occupies Chief Place
on Program
The somewhat diverse elementst
which compose the entertainment to
be given by the Girls' Glee club and
Masques in Hill auditorium tomorrowe
evening, are being rapidly assembledt
into a unified whole under the direc-a
tion of Miss Nora Crane Hunt, of thet
School of Music., and Prof. J. R.c
Brumm, of the rhetoric department.1
Rehearsals for Masques' playlet, "The
Worsted Man," have been going with at
rush the last few days, and there is
abundant promise that full justice
will be done to the "comedietta", one-2
of the productions of John Kendrickc
Bangs.
The combined organizations havel
secured Lucile -Johnson, '20, harpist,
to give several selections immediately
preceding the play. She is a memberc
of the School of Music faculty, andt
appeared at the last faculty concert.i
Boarding House Teams Should Sign Upt
Boarding houses who desire to enter-
teams in theboarding house basket-
ball league~ and who have not yet
signed up at the athletic office are re-
quested to do so at once by the in-
tramural department.,
Senior Lit Class Dues Received Today
Members of the senior lit class can
pay their dues for the present semester
at the west entrance of the Library
this afternoon from 2 until 5 o'clock.
All back dues may also be paid at this
time.

FRANCIS NEILSON
Who Lectures at University Hall To-
night
Francis Neilson
Lectures Tonight

Ex-Member of Parliament Talks
"how Diplomats Make War"
in University Hall

on

Francis Neilson, ex-member of par-
liament, lecturer and author of
many books, will lecture at 8
o'clock tonight in University hall,
speaking on "How Diplomats Make
War."
He comes here to deliver this ad-
dress at an opportune time, for it was
only recently that Franz Josef, one of
the members of the quartet of mon-
archs that were ruling when the war
broke out, died. Mr. Neilson in his lec-
ture attacks the ruling class of Great
Britain and the methods of diplomacy
that characterized the first few weeks
of the war, and has coitinued in some
measure even to the present time.
Mr. Neilson was a member of parlia-
ment for five years, both preceding and
following the outbreak of the war, and
is in a position to speak authoritatively
concerning the diplomacy of the United
Kingdom. He has lectured for many
years, and during the last four years
alone he has averaged more than one
and one-half meetings every day in
the year. Aside from that he was
writing almost continuously for the
economic magazines and was attending
to his duties in the parliament.
Mr. Neilson delivered a lecture last
-year in one of the local churches,
speaking on the different reconstruc-
tion problems that would have to be
met at the close of the war. He .will
tonight discuss not only the diplomacy
of the nations now involved in the
present cataclysm, but will consider
some of the newer phases of "after-
the-war problems."
. The lecture will be given under the
auspices of the Oratorical association.
An admission of' 25 cents will be
charged. ,
Deutscher Verein Dues Should Be Paid
All dues of the lower section of the
Deutscher Verein are now payable. An
officer of the 'organization will be in
the Verein room Thursday mornuing
from 8 to 12 o'clock for the purpose
of receiving sudh dues. This will be
the last opportunity to make payment.

Washington, Dec. 5.-The first dem-
onstration by suffragists such as
heckled the British house of commons
t the past,. occurred in the house to-
day while the president was reading
his annual message. Soon after he
had started speaking, a big yellow silk
banner was unfurled from the house
gallery by a group of suffrage sym-
pathizers. It bore the inscription:
"Mr. President, what will you do for
women's suffrage?"
The unfurling of the banner had
been carefully planned. After the
demonstration, pamphlets were passed
out by women in the corridors giving
printed details of just what happened
in so far as the women were con-
cerned. This printed information in-
ciuded the names of the women who
anfurled the banner.
START POSTER COMPETITION
Union Opera Drawings Due Shortly
After Christmas Vacation
In an attempt to bring out a large
number of contestants for the 1917
Union opera poster competition, a
meeting will be held at the Union at 7
o'clock tomorrow evening for all those
interested in the contest. The first
prize, that is for the winning poster,
will be $10, the second prize two opera
tickets, and one opera ticket for the
third prize.
The drawings submitted must not
only serve as an opera poster but
also as a cover for the opera music
score. and will be due some time
shortly after the Christmas vacation.
Arthur Schupp, '17E, general chair-
man of the opera, also stated last night
that tryouts for the opera cast will be
held some time next week. Those
wishing to try out are urged to make
some preparation beforehand.
xaval Reserves Drill in Gym Tonight
Waterman gymnasium will be the'
scene of the regular Wednesday night.:
drill of the naval reserves this week.
Assembly will be blown at 7 o'clock
sharp and every man is required to be
in line at thatetime. Men are re-
quested to appear in rubber-soled
shoes and to have with them their lines
and notebooks. Those who have not
yet handed in their uniform measure-
ments will do so tonight.
Report Italian Steamer Palmero Sunk:
Paris, Dec. v.-The Italian steamer3
Palermo, with Americans aboard, has
been sunk, according to reports re-
ceived here. The survivors were
landed on the Spanish coast.

BLAME STORAGE

DETROIT SOPRNO TO
BE HEARDAT CONCERT
Miss Lois M. Johnston, Who Won First
Place in Musicians' Contest,
Guest of Faculty
Miss Lois M. Johnston, soprano, of
Detroit, who will be the guest soloist
at the faculty concert in Hill auditor-
ium this afternoon, has recently had
the distiuction of winning first place
iii the second annual contest for young,
musicians, given under the auspices of
the National Federation of Musical
clubs.
Miss Johnston's success in this con-
test will probably entitle her to a
place in the national contest, which
will be held in Brimingham, Ala., in1
April.
Miss Johnston is studying with
Theodore Harrison of the University
S ¢ool of Music and will present at
this time "Depuis le Jour" from
"Louise," and a group of songs.
NEW MEMBERS TO STAGE SKIT
'BEFORE COMEDY CLUB FRIDAY
The Comedy club will be entertained
with a skit staged by the new mem-,
hers at 8 o'clock Friday night in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. Immediately aft-
er the entertainment, a dance will be
held in Barbour gymnasium.
A suitable play has not yet been.
selected for this year, according to
Morrison Wood, '17, president of the
club, but the executive committee
hopes to have one ready for an early
spring production.
Glee Club to First Appear Dec. 15.
The University Glee and Mandolin
club will make its this year's initial-
appearance at the Christmas concert to
be held Friday evening, Dec. 15, in Hill
auditorium. The personnel of the club
is larger than ever before, and a pro-
gram of good music and original stunts
is assured. The committees for the
promotion of this performance will be
announced Friday of this week, and
tickets will go on sale Sunday, Dec. 10.

~MICHI6ANENSIAN SELLS
1917 Book to Contain Action Pictures
of Football Men and Separate
Women's Section
Sales for the -first day of the Mich-
iganensian subscription campaign sur-
prised the staff it its increase over last
year's record. While no exact returns
of the Tuesday sales are available,
comparative results show that the
table in the engineering 'building has
secured the largest number of sub-
scriptions, the table in the general
library being next.
In addition to the features already
mentioned in connection with the 1917
book, it will contain action pictures
of every man on the football squad
and individual pictures of each cla~r
officer. The pages devoted to wo6
men's activities throughout the book,
and a new feature section portraying
events of the current university year
in photography will be added. The
promise of early production of the
book seems to have met with the ap-
proval of the student body.
Owing to the prospective rise in the
cost of materials the number of books
published will but slightly exceed the
number ordered during the present
campaign. For this reason the staff
of the Michiganensian wishes the stu-
dent body to make a special effort to
sign up for books during the renliain-
ing 'three days.
Orders will be taken between
7:45 and 5:30 o'clock today in the
Libarary, engineering building, dental
building, and University hall.
GERMANS CONTINUE ADVANCE
Mackensen and Danube Armies Drive
Back Roumanian Defense
Berlin, Dec. 5.-Field Marshal von
Mackensen's victorious advancing
army crossed the railroad leading from
Bucharest to Targoviste, and the Dan-
ube army has gained a foothold in the
lower Argesul valley after defeating
numerically superior forces. The Dan-
ube army pursued the retreating
enemy into this section. The left wing
of the same army was said to have ad-
vanced and begun fighting beyond this.
sector.
"The number of prisoners reported
yesterday now increased to 12,500," the
final statement -aid. "This does not
include cature of the ninth army of
2,000 or the Danube army of 2,500."
Russian troops attempted unsuccess-
fully to ad ance south of the railroad
from Tarnopol t3 Krasne near Augus-
towka.

Mrs. Edouard 11. Richar Chos
President; Conrad Church, '1
Temporary Chairman
An organization, known as
lousewives' league of Ann Arbor
mormed at a meeting of 75 repres
tine women of the city and Univ4
at the city hall yesterday after
Its purupose is "to combine
;milar organizations in other cit
an attempt to reduce present pr<
five prices."
The meeting was called to ord
Conrad N. Church, '17, of The I
who acted as temporary chair
Church outlin'ed the situation and
of the work being done by simila
cieties all over the country and
suggestions as to the formation
organization. Mrs. A. F. Shull
chosen chairman and a discuss
(he best methods to pursue folli
Mrs. Edouard M. Richar was cl
president of the permanent orga
tion, which is to be known as
iounsewives' league. Miss Mart
Hills was chosen vice-president
Mrs. Delia S. Fogg was chosen s
tary. These officersare now eng
in appointing an executive I
which is to be composed of repres
tives from each ward of the city.
league will communicate with
Housewives' leagues of Toledo an
troit, and possibly other places,
will gather data regarding metho+
procedure.
In the discussion which precede
election of officers it was evident
the women did not intend to con
against the local merchants. It se
to be the prevailing sentiment
the grocers and other merchant
Ann Arbor are laboring under as I
difficulties as the housewiwves t:
selves and that the fault lies lai
with the storage coapanies and e
monopolizing agencies of the cou
Several merchants' wives were l
ent at the meeting, as well as b(
ing house keepers and steward
sororitiesand"fraternities.
It was decided to hold a me
next Wednesday afternoon at
o'clock in the common council c
bers.. The executive board an4
many of the charter members as
able to attend will be present a
meeting. It was urged that all w
who are interested in the subje
asked to come to this meeting.
At the conclusion of yesterday's
sion the following women sig
their intention of becoming ch
members of the new organiza
Mrs. Carleton Kent, Mrs. H. M.
dalI, Mrs. A. F. Shull. Margaret
nolds, '17, Mrs. F. E. Parry, Mrs.
A. Schryver, Mrs. Maria Peel, M
L. Clarke, Mrs. J. R. Nelson,
H. S. Russel, Mrs. M. J. Taft, Mi
F. Freeman, Miss Martha S. Hills,
E. M. Plunkett, Mrs. W. V. Brace,
E. C. Lindsey, Mrs. E. H. Kraus,
A. G. Hall, Mrs. L. P. Jocelyn, M
T:, Mv'-nnery, Miss F. M. Brown,'
Wegener, Mrs. Magdalene C. God
N! <. mes J. Quarry, Mrs.. J
Knox, Mrs. C. . Carey, Mrs. RV
m Huphreys Mrs. F. A. Tinker,
Fremont P. Ward, Mrs. N. A. V
Mrs. C. C. Freeman,.Mrs. Edouar
Riciiar, Mis. Delia Fogg.
Guard Placed on Forestry Farm N
Owing to the fact that a few Cl
mas trees were stolen last year
t ' c" forv'%ry 'farm, the forestry de
mert of the University has plac
guard on the farm at night to pr
such an occurence this year.

U I

Normal Concert Course

Sat., Dec. 7 at 8.00 p. m.

YPSILANTI, MICH.
CHRISTMAS MUSIC
Choir of zoo Mixed Voices Singing Alla Cappella
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Conductor
Russian Liturgical Music by Gretchyaninov; Old French (Gevaert); Old English
(Coventry Mystery Plays); "Ave Mari Stella," by Grieg; Modern Compositions
by Widor, Massenet, Augusta Holmes, Elgar and Leopold Damrosch. Old Nativity
hymns played upon the Clavichord.
Special Interurban Car at 7 P. M., returning immediately after Concert
ADMISSION, Soc

TOMORROW NIGHT HILL AUDITORIUM

!The

Worsted Man"

IN THE
Girls' Glee Club and Masques Entertainment
25 CENTS

k

1917

ORDER YOUR
VlCH IG ANE

SIA

TODAY
TABLES IN U-HALL-LIBItARY-ENGINEERING AND DENTAL BUILDING

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