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December 05, 1916 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Fi

TEAMS

3 ALL-

T 'K

* First team. Second team.
* Baston, Minnesota ............. L. E ..............Dunne, Michigan
* Mayer, Minnesota..............L. T................Weske, Michigan
* McInerney, North Dakota... .L. G ................Higgins, Chicago
* Becker, Iowa............. . ..,...C.............. Carpenter, Wisconsin
* Ecklund, Minnesota.......... .R. G.............Townley, Minnesota
* Jackson, Chicago..............R. T.............Blacklock, M. A. C.
*r Driscoil, Northwestern.........R. E................Myers, Wisconsin
* Macomber, Illinois..... ........Q. B................ Sparks, Michigan
* Maulbetsch, Michigan..........L. II....................Davis, Iowa
* Harley, Ohio State............R. H ............ Cofall, North Dakota
Wyman, Minnesota..... . .....F. B............Kohler, North Dakota

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Greatest

Intramural

Fgures Prove

Jasketball to be,

AttractionI

That more students are interested in
basketball than in any other sport is
proved by the following report, which
was issued last summer by Director
of Intramural Athletics Floyd A, Rowe.
It shows the number of contestants
and teams in each interclass sport in-
dulged in by the students last year.
Basketball leads its nearest competi-
tion, tennis, by 100 entries, football by
175, and baseball by 200. There were
16 football teams entered in the class
league, employing 11 men apiece, giv-
ing a total of 176 men playing regular-
ly. Baseball had 21 teams of nine
regular players, giving a total of 189
men. Basketball had 22 teams, em-
ploying five men, giving a total of
110 regulars.
Subtracting these figures from the
total number who turned out for these
sports, 340 men who were unable to
play continually on basketball teams,

99 on football squads, and 61 in base-
ball, making nearly four times as many
men who tried out for basketball,
knowing that the chance of their play-
ing regularly on the team was at least
doubtful, than tried out for football
under the same conditions, and nearly
six times as many as turned out for
baseball.
The report of the intramural depart-
ment follows:
Number Number

MALIE PLED ON
ALL-WESTERN TEAM
Eckersall Also Names Dunne, Sparks,
and Weske on His Second
Outfit
MINNESOTA GETS FIVE PLACES
Captain John Maulbetsch was the
only Michigan man honored by Walter
Eckersall on his first All-Westerh
team. Bull Dunne, Sparks, and Weske
were selected by the Windy City critic
for his second team.
No one has ever yet selected an All-
American, All-Western or All-Any-
thing team that wasn't assailed by a
host of critics, and Walter's choices
probably won't prove any exception,
but at the same time his aggregations
are interesting since he is one of the
recognized football critics of the coun-
try and particularly so with reference
to western football.
Eckersall's selection of Maulbetsch
meets with the unanimous approval of
the Michigan campus and probably will
with all western critics. The German
Bullet played a wonderful game all
year and his work was the distinct
feature of nearly all of Michigan's
games. Many were surprised to see
that Eckersall did not place Bull
Dunne on his first team as in the
opinion of many there isn't a finer end
in the west and but few that can
equal the big left flanker in the coun-
try. Baston of Minnesota is one of the
individual football stars of the western
conference and his selection is not a
surprise, but Michigan students will
solemnly afirm that Bull ought to draw
the other assignment. Wyman to Bas-
ton has proved the most effective for-
ward pass combnation that the con-
ference has ever seen, and if Bull
were on the other extremity, Baston's
glory would just be halved, for Bull
can grab those long flings with the
best of them. He doesn't have to take
his hat off to anyone.
Of course every western college be-
lieves that it has several men who
have been overlooked and this is only
natural. Here at Michigan, popular
opinion would seem to indicate that
Eckersall has overlooked a good bet in
Tad Wieman. Weske's choice at one
of the tackles gives Michigan an ex-
cellent showing, but give anyone an
inch and they want the proverbial
mile.
Michigan's representation is a good
one as the Wolverines have four men
mentioned for the two teams. Minne-
sota is the only aggregation having as
many men picked, although the west-
erners have the edge on the Wolver-
ines since four 'of their players are
on the first team.
The selection of Hugh Blacklock of
M. A. C. will probably be confirmed by
Michigan men, as the Aggie star played
an excellent game against the Maize
and Blue.
NO GAME SOCCER SEASON ENDS
Trio of Attempted Meetings All Fall
Through During Fall
Lack of competition proved a knock-
out blow to the soccer football team,
the closing of whose season has Just
been announced. The authorities at-
tempted to schedule games with Ypsi
Normal, Battle Creek Normal, and
M. A. C., but all three efforts were
unfruitful. The smallpox scare at
Ypsilanti killed all chance of a con-
test with the teachers,. the Battle
Creekites disbanded their team along

about mid-season, and the Farmer
game was lost through inability to
agree as to the scene of battle.
A squad of 25 men worked with
Coach Peirsol all season. Fleischer,
and Panayotides showed a fine brand
and Pannayotides showed a fine brand
of soccer in the forward line. For
the backfield positions, Cohen, Rush,
O'Brien, and Mason were worthy con-
tenders, while Tripolitis and Feizy,
goal tenders, and Kiefer at center
rounded out the aggregation.

SENIOR RIGERS GRAB
THIIRD SET OfNUMEALS

of Teams.
Basketball ............ 22
Baseball...............21
indoor baseball........ 12
1'ootball .............. 16

Hockey................
Track ................
Tennis ...............
Soccer ................
Rifle .................
Cross country.........

8
2

of Men.
450
250
125
275
90
195
350
35
164
76

Sisler Played on
Ferry Field, Too
American league batting averages,
which have just been compiled, show
that George Sisler ranks tenth among
the 185 players who broke into the
1916 figures. Sisler hit .305 for the
season and played in 151 of the 158
games that his team staged.
Two of the players who rank ahead
of Sisler numerically played in only a
few games, so virtually the Michi-
gander is eighth. The players who
topped Sis during the year are the
recognized stars of the game. Speaker
led the league with .386 and was fol-
lowed by Cobb, Jackson, Strunk, Col-
lins, Gardner, Veach, and Sisler.
In stolen bases, George stands well
up among the leaders. Ty Cobb lead
the circuit with Marsans, one of Sis-
ler's teammates, second. Shotten, an-
other St. Louis player, is third with
Eddie Collins fourth. Tris Speaker
ranks number five with a total of 35
thefts to his credit, while Sisler is
just one shy of the Clevelander's mark
and is sixth.
In the matter of total bases, the
former Michigan star also ranks up
near the top, as he pounded out 21
doubles, 11 triples, and three home
runs.
In the matter of runs scored the one-
time Wolverine is again found in the
first ten. George completed the cir-
cuit 83 times, while one Tyrus Ray-
,nond Cobb copped off first honors
with a total of 113.

Patterson

Beats Fresh Laves By Cop-
ping Pass Behind
Goal

By breaking all conventions of the
season and winning a game before at
least three or four preliminary draws
had been staged, the senior engineers
copped from the fresh laws y erday
afternoon and walked off with the
third set of numerals by a verdict of 6
to 0. The weather and the field being
most unfavorable there was no men-
tionable showing of rooters for either
side. Enthusiasts undoubtedly ex-
pecting another tie preferred to spend
the dismal day in comfort and witness
the final decision under more favor-
able conditions.
The laws were again at the disad-
vantage of playing without several
regulars. Johnson, Lambert and Hud-
son were not in the lineup.
The count scored by the winners
was made by Patterson who grabbed
the ball which was being batted about
in the air after a pass, and dropped
over the line for a touchdown. This
play, the subject of ten minutes
wrangling, was, made possible by the
gains of Turner who had brought the
leather within .the laws ten-yard line.
During the earlier part of the contest
two attempts were made at a field goal
by the engineers. Both of these kicks
which were accurately aimed 'fell
short of the posts.
The lineup: Engineers-Winch, 1.
e.; Dresser, l.t.; Patterson, l.g.; Hyde,

,c.; Bedford, r.t.; Crandall, r.g.; Smith,
r.e.; Dondero, q.; Turner, r.h.; Walt-
erhouse, l.h.; Taylor, f.b. Laws- Ing-
ham, L.e.; Rosenthal, L.t.; Hyman, l.g.;
Phillips, c.; Gray, r.g.; Weideman, r.,
t.; O'Connor, r.e.; Perry, q.; North-

TO NAME LEADER TOMORROW
Fourteen "1" Men Will Be Sole Voters
on iNext Season's Captain

Out of the grand total of 185 players
who broke into the season's averages
this year, only 11 succeeded in climb-
ing into the coveted .300 class and
Sisler is, of course, in this group. This
fact alone shows the value of the St.
Loui star and with a few more years'
experience under his belt, George is
going to give them all a battle. Sis
is the most popular player on the St.
Louis club and one of the best liked
individuals in the league.
A DDITIONAL SPORTS ON PAGE 6
IN TEIiCOLLE GA T E S
Nebraska: Nebraska has a co-ed soc.
cer football teAm which has just
completed a very successful season.
This is the first year the stunt has
leen tried at Nebraska, but its per-
manence is assured by the interest
and enthusiasm manifested through-
out the season.
\anderbilt: Vanderbilt is to have a
new athletic field that will accom-
modate 12,000 spectators. It is to
be called the Dudley Memorial Ath-
letic field in honor of Dr. W. L. Dud-
ley, who made a large appropriation
in his will for the purpose.
Try a Michigan Daily Want Ad.
with his chilly blasts
and wear a
Spldig
*Spa ean
WDJP
" Big, warm and comn-
fortable, with a high
storm collar that
covers the ears when
turned up. Good
weight, best quality
worsted, with a
pocket on each side.
A good looking garment
and very serviceable
Price $8.50
Others, of course-.end for our catlogue
A. G. SPALDING &r BROS.ie
121 Woodward A ve. Detroit, Nich.

way, r.h.; Patterson, f.b. Tomorrow is the day for.the elec-
Touchdown: Patterson.
tion of the 1917 Varsity football cap-
".EVELAND ALUMNI TO GIVE Itain. With Athletic Director Bartelme
BANQUET FOR "P EP" ATHLETES back the gridders of the past season
will gather and cast the ballot which
gdecides what man will lead the Wol-
Michigan alumni living in Cleveand verines on Ferry field next fall.
will tender a banquet to the Michigan Fourteen ballots will be turned in,
students and high school athletes liv- ' the men who won 'heir "M" against
ing in the "sixth city" during the Pennsy and Corne this year voting.
Christmas holidays. The affair will The choice shoou e rather close and
be held in the rooms of the Electrical no pre-election dope is authoritative
club at the Hotel Statler. and none such is available to those
A smoker is being planned for a few not on the inside of affairs.
days before the beginning of the The man who fills Maulie's shoes
Christmas recess in order to organize will have n© liaht iob when he noe

the Cleveland students who expect to
attend the dinner. The committee in
charge of this affair is E. M. Murphy,'
'17E, chairman; R. Kimberley, '18E, B.
G. Kraus, '18, R. Meade, '18E, and D.
Moorehead, '18E.
MICHIGA NENSIAN SUBSCRIPTI ON
CAMPAIGN BEGINS TODAY.
SAVE 50 ENTS.
Try a Michigan Daily Want Ad.

out to lead the 1917 Maize and Blue
team. The soon-to-be ex-captain re-
ceived splendid support all season!
from both )the members of the team
and student body, and it is a pretty
safe bet that his successor will find no
difference in the team's attitude next
year.
3ICH IGA NENSIAN SUBSCRIPTION
C A PA IGN BEGINS TOD AY.
SAVE a CENTS.

CLARION 2j in. LENOX 2j in.
Two heights in the new
COLLAR
1k Each
CEO. P. IDE & CO., Makers, TROY. N. Y.
Atse M'akers of Ide Shirts

I'

o I

DANCING PARTY
At Armory
FRIDAY, DEC. 8,1916
9F
FISHERS'S EIGHT PIECE ORCHESTRA

I
I

GYM

SVPPLIES

PIANO-----"Gorny"Gornetzky.
VIOLIN --_--Tan" Tanner.
CORNET - "Doc" Dimmock.
BANJO RINE ---Erd" King.

TROMBONE-----"Loue"Otto
BAS VIOLIN _---Curley" Davis
PICCOLO-_--. "C. P." Toole
DRUMS____Johnny" Schwer

The Most Complete Line In The City
Complete Gym Suit $2.00
You will notice the difference in these
Gym Suits. They are made up especi-
all for Michigan Students.
GEO0 JHO
"SPORT SHOP"
711 N. Universlty Ave. Next To Arcade Thseatre

THIS PARTY LIMITED STRICTLY TO STUDENTS
Matron in Attendance

$1.00 Per Couple
Limited 125

Tickefs on sale at BUSY BEE
Wed., Dec. 6th, 10 A. M.

r

Detroit

Liked
Ili

the

rlS

9

So

Will

You

Hiell Audl*torl'*v ,m

S ;4 -
Thur.'10

.

Have you ever heard the Sunrise Daughters' Quartette?
Would you like to go with the raggle-taggle gypsies?
Did you ever get acquainted with a personage like "The Worsted Man"?

Have you ever met Madame Homer's double?

n. i K .K.

All these and more at the

Girls'

l,3Ie e

Clxzb

and

ma'sque

F

A Real Harp Soloist-Lucille Johnson

Alarm clocks, $1.00 up. ChapInk&U
eweler, 113 South Main St. tues-sod

121 East Wa t

torn Street

Michigan men have
efullness and refine<

appr

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