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December 05, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-05

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--"..

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THE WEATHER
FOR ANN ARBOR-
IRAN A) COLDER; PROBABLY
LIGIT SNOW FLURRIES

'
AIL
.,,: YxN

u-rn-

DAI

UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NI(ULT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNLNU PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

6.

Tr^I °

VOL. XXVII. No. 55.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, 1 ITESDAY, L17TE IMM 5, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENT

__...BO , _C.I N,.._.__Y DEC MBE _5_191. . wIflE li'vE PTcThJ'

1I

- -- - -

NN ARBHOR WOMEN
COMBINE TO FIGHT
HIGH FOOD PRICES

I

Noted Anarchist
Gives Addresses,
Miss Emma Goldman Discusses Leo
Tolstoy and Fyodor Dos-
toyevsky

t

PROMINENT WOMEN P
COMMON COUNCIL I
USE OF ROOMS

P'ETITION
FOR

WILL MEET THIS AFTERNOON
Latest Step in Approval of Plan Shown
by Detroit Mayor; Threatens
Municipal Stores

Representing all the women of Ann.
Arbor and the University of Michigan.
25 delegates will meet at the common
council chamber in the city hall at 2
o'clock this afternoon to organize an
associationrto reduce the cost of some
articles of food whose present prices
make them prohibitive.
At the common council last night
the following petition was presented
to the aldermen:
"To the Honorable Gentlemen of the
Common Council:
"We humbly petition' your body for
the use of the council chambers at 2
o'clock tomorrow afternoon, Tuesday,'
Dec. c. Representatives of all the
women's clubs and organizations in
the city of Ann Arbor wish to meet.
at that time to discuss the formation
of an organization whose purpose it
shall be to promote measures which
*r ** ** *** *
* DETROIT MAYOR FAVORS
* MUNICIPAL GROCERIES *
* Detroit, Dec. 4.-A chain of *
municipal grocery stores in De- *
troit as a means of halting soar- *?
* ing food prices will be estab- *
* lished unless there is an im- *
* mediate relief from present pro- *
* hibitive prices.
* ' This announcement came to- *
* day from the office of Mayor *
* Oscar B. Marx. Food will be *.
* purchased in great quantities *
* and sold to residents at cost. *
* Marx asserted he would name a *
* commission in a few days to *
* work out the details of the plan. *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
shall alleviate the food situation in.
this city.
"Similar organizations are being
formed in every city of the United
States, and Ann Arbor, we intend,
shall not be lax in this respect.
"Therefore we petition your body
for the use of the council chambers to-
morrow afternoon so that our desir-
able end may be achieved.
"Signed: Mrs. Maria Peel, city vis-
itor Ann Arbor Federation of Char-I
ities, vice-president W. C. T. U.; Mrs.
W. H. Wait, D. A. R.; Mrs. C. B. Kin-
yon, president D. A. R.; Mrs. S. B.I
Ward, president Federation of Char-
ities; Mrs. C. V. Kent, president Moth-
ers' club, Seventh ward; Mrs. J. J.
Quarry, St. Joseph's sanitorium auxil-
iary; Mrs. W. D. Henderson, Miss Ada
Hill, Mrs. M. T. Taft, president W. C.
T. U.; Miss Margaret Reynolds, presi-
ident Women's league; Mrs. E. M.
Richar, Woman's club, Mothers' club;
Mrs. H. M. Randall, D. A. R., Col-
legiate alumnae, Mothers' club; Mrs.
W. H. Pettee, president Ladies' union;
Mrs. Edward Kraus, president of Al-
lied Mothers' clubs; Mrs. E. D. Kinne,
president Collegiate alumnae; Mrs.
John R. Effinger, Mrs. L. Buckley,
president Neighborhood club; Dean
Myra B. Jordan; Mrs. A. G. Hall."
The request was unanimously
granted by the aldermen.
This afternoon all these women or
their representatives and all other
women who are interested in the food
question will . meet at the council
chambers. Conrad N. Church, '17, of
The Daily, will act as temporary chair-
man. He will outline the purpose of
the meeting and tell of the progress
which similar organizations have made
in other parts of the United States. A

F Miss Emma Goldman yesterday aft-
ernoon spoke to a large audience on
the subject of "Leo Tolstoy, Artist and
Prophet." The lecture dealt with the
origin of Russian literature, its growth
and devopment, and its greatest ex-I
ponent, Leo Tolstoy.
"When the Russian church excom-
municated Leo Tolstoy, she know well
what she was doing," said Miss Gold-
man. "The. church was never de-
ceived by his Christian cloak of his
message. She knew that beneath it
stood a gigantic personality, a world-
wide influence upon the minds and
hearts of the thinking people.
"The main reason that the Russian
government did not banish or imprison
Tolstoy is summed up by- Miss Gold-
man in the following words: "The
Russian government dared not touch
Tolstoy because it realized that if it
did it would have been making his
position more impregnable. That is
why the government left the task to
the church, hoping that by excom-
munication he would lose his hold
upon the people."
Last night Miss Emma Goldman lec-
tured on "Fyodor Dostoyevsky, the
Psychologist of Misery and Poverty."
She treated with his deformity through
birth, his condemnation to death, and
his life in Siberia.
Rumor American Killed in Chihuahua
El Paso, Dec. 4.-Unconfirmed
rumors reached state department
agents and other authorities here this
afternoon that Charles Ellmendorf,
American, was killed by Villistas in
Chihuahua City. It was also reported
that Charles Kettleson, German vice-
consul, was slain. These rumors have
been persistent but every effort to
learn the fate of the American has
proved unavailing.
To Examine Alleged Food Conspirants
Washington, Dec. 4.-The United
States bureau of information, "the
secret service" of the department of'
justice is co-operating with district at-
torneys throughout the country in{
their investigation of alleged food con-c
spiracies, A. Bruce Billaski, chief of
the bureau, said today.

RE1 PORTHTWOCAS
of SMALLPOX I
CITY oFANMRBR
ANN ARBOR MAN AND WOMAN
FRM DFRANDg CONFIN-
ED TO HOSPITAL
HEALTH OFFICER WARNS CITY
Dr. Wessinger to Prosecute Persons
Who Break State and City
Laws
There are two cases of smallpox in
the city of Ann Arbor. Harry J. Van-
dawater, 24 years old, 845 Dewey ave-
nue, and a woman who arrived from
Durand, Mich., Snday afternoon, are
confined in the contagious hospital
suffering from the disease.
Edward Vandawater, the campus
mail carrier, is a brother to the sick
man and was exposed to the disease.
In view of this fact Dr. John A. Wess-
inger, city health officer, has repeated
his warning to the student body to be
vaccinated at once, unless they can
show a physician's certificate of vac-
cination issued within a reasonbale
length of time.
The case of the Durand woman was
not known until she had been in the
University hospital for two hours.
She arrived on the 1:50 train of the
Ann Arbor railroad, Sunday afternoon,
to undergo treatment here for some
ailment. Later it was noticed that she
was all broken out with the small-
pox.
Dr. Wessinger has stated that he
will prosecute all persons who break
the state and city laws regarding the
notifying of the health officer of con-
tagious diseases. The laws referred
to run as follows:
"Whenever any householder, hotel-
keeper, keeper of a boarding house, or
tenant. shall know onshall be inform-
ed by a physician or shall have reason
to believe that any person in his fam-
ily, hotel, boarding house, or premises,
is taken sick with smallpox, cholera,
diphtheria, scarlet fever, or any other
disease dangerous to public health, he
shall immediately give notice in writ-
ing thereof to the health officer of the
township, city or village, in which he
resides."
At present the status of contagious d
diseases in Ann Arbor is as follows:
smallpox, two cases; diphtheria, five
cases; pneumonia, two cases; chick-
enpox, 11 cases; whooping cough, one
case; and infantile paralysis, twof
cases. Most of these cases are being1
cared for at the contagious hospital.1
LAUNCH CAPAIGN FOR
MICHIGANENSIAN TODAY
Tables for Subscriptions Placed in
Various Buildings Around t
Campusc
Starting at 7:45 o'clock this morn-
ing, the Michiganensian will launch
its campaign for subscriptions for theI
1917 book. Tables at which subscrip-i
tions will be received today are 10-
cated in University hall, the generalf
Library, the engineering building andc
the law building, and will remain open
unfil 5:30 o'clock. The tables in the
general Library and University halli
will be kept there throughout the cam-e
paign, while the one in the engineeringc

building will be there only on the 1
first three days. The table in the law
building will be moved to the dental
building Wednesday, to the medical
building Thursday and the economics
building Friday, remaining in each of
these 'buildings one day only.
Students who subscribe at this timel
will, in addition to saving 50 cents, be
assured of a copy of this year's Michi-
anensian, f

Plea for Mass 7leeting
To the Student Body:
Tomorrow night at the war mass meeting students and faculty
will be given an opportunity to hear first hand testimony concern-
ing conditions surrounding the prison camps in war-stricken Europe.
The undersigned, feeling that campus opinion should be secured
in regard to the advisability of the University joining other colleges
to aid in the prison camp work, urge that you be present.
THE MICHIGAN UNION,
THE Y. M. C. A.,
THE, STUDENT COUNCIL,
THE WOMEN'S LEAGUE,
THE Y. W. C. A.,
THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

MASS MEETING TO
HEAR PRISON CASE

BERLI1N DECLARES-'
ICTORY WON, ON
COMBiNED DRIVES OF MACKEN-
SEN ANDI FALKENHAYN
VICTORIOUS
RUSSIANS STUBBORN IN EAST
According to German Dispatches Brit-
ish Repulsed on Ypres Part of
Somme Front
Berlin, Dec. 4.--"The battle has been
won was the Berlin declaration late
today, following the assault which
l'ield Miarshal von Mackensen made
a-Jinst Roumanian forces on the
Argesal river, south of Bucharest.
'The operations of General von
Iallkenluayn's army which in the mid-
'dle of November began with the vic-
torious battle of Targujiu, and those
of the German - Bulgarian -Turkish

CAPITAL WATCHE.S
H.C.OFL._SITUATION
Wilson Urged by A. F. of L. to Insti-
trte Federal Probe; President
Considers Matter,

I. W.

Whitehair of Cornell and iMIniiie
Holzhauser, Back from
Brusrah, Will Talk

('AMPAIGN REFERENDUM A NOVEL jI.YAY XAMEND CONGRESS MESSAGE

permanent organization will be per-
fected and measures for combating the
present high prices will be discussed.
Toledo and Grand Rapids are two
cities in the vicinity of Ann Arbor
which have already perfected their or-
ganizations. Eventually the whole
United States may be organized into a
national league.
Moving picture companies form an-
other powerful agency which will co-
operate with these organizations. In
every theater in the country advice as
to the best methods of combating the
food speculators will be flashed upon
the screen. In the coming session of
congress, Congressman Fitzgerald will
introduce a resolution calling for a
food embargo by the United States.
The local movement originated. in
the offices of The Daily. It was, felt
that the city was ready for such a
movement and inquiries among repre-
sentative women of the city showed
hat the project would receive an en-
thusiastic support. Representatives of
all the clubs that could be reached
were called up and their names so-
licited for the petition to the common
council.
Not .only were club women called
upon to lend their support, but other
influential women in all parts of the
city. It is hoped that all women who
are interested in the project will make
their appearance at the city hall to-
morrow and take part in the proceed-
ings.
Stewards of the various fraternities
and sororities will be asked to lend
their support to the movement, and
boarding houses and restaurants all
over the city will be represented.

Michigan students will be able to
get some first hand evidence on con-
ditions which prevail in prison camps
of the warring nations from C. W.
Whitehair, secretary of the Cornell
LUiniversity Y. M. C. A., and Minnie
Ifolzhauser, grad., who will be the
speakers at the mass meeting to be
held in Hill auditorium tomorrow
night.
The meeting which is called by the
various campus organizations is in
the nature of an experiment. After
hearing the information given at the
mass meeting, students will decide by
an all-campus vote whether or not a
campaign shall be started to raise con-
tributions for prison camp work.
The pas t experiences of the two
speakers who will appear at the mass
meeting tomorrow night, insure talks
which will be interesting and instruc-
tive. Mr. Whitehair has had a great
deal of experience in prison camp
work in the present European war. He
has seen conditions in the prison
camps of England and France and has
visited hundreds of hospitals in prac-
tically all of the warring nations. Mr.
Whitehair carries personal recom-
mendations from the diplomats of
nearly all the belligerent countries.
Miss Minnie Holzhauser is a Michi-
gan graduate from the homeopathic
school for nurses. She went to Bus-
rah, Arabia, directly after the close
of her course in the University in 1913,
and since that time has gone through
three seasons of plague, among the
peoples of Mesopotamia. She was the
head nurse of the hospital in Busrah
and was the only trained nurse within
a radius of 100 miles. She finally suc-
cumbed to typhus fever and returned
to this country.
Both of these speakers have thrill-
ing stories to tell of their personal
experiences in the European war and
will paint vivid pictures of the condi-
tions which now exist in foreign prison
camps.
Russians Beaten Near Drysevaty
Berlin, Dec. 4.-Repulse of strong
Russian attacks north of Drysevaty
lake following artillery prepaartion,
was reported in this afternoon's of-1
ficial statement detailing the fighting
on Prince Leopold's front. The Russ-
ians lost heavily.
Russian attacking activity along'
Arch Duke Joseph's front in the for-
est of the Carpathians, increased. In
only a few places were the enemy able
to make feeble advances and these
were easily repulsed. The Russianj
pressure is still maintained strongly
on the Transylvanian east front.
Workers Get Ten Per Cent Increase
Bethlehem, Pa., Dec. 4.-The Beth-
lehem Steel company announced to-
day an increase of ten per cent in
wages for all its employees to date
rom Dec. 16.

BULLETIN.
Washington, Dec. 4.-President
Wilson is seriously considering
the advisability of making an
eleventh-hour amendment to his
message, making recommendation
for some form of federal investiga-
tion into the high cost of living,
when he appears before the joint
session tomorrow, it was learned
today.
By ROBERT J. BENDER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Washington, Dec. 4.-The high cost
of living held the attention of prac-
tically all- official Washington today.
Resolutions and bilis calling for food
embargoes, government control, inves-
tigations, legislation directed against
cold storage industries and various
other plans for bringing the rising
food prices within reach of the average
man's pocketbook, poured in, or were
announced as pending when congress
reconvenes.
President Wilson was directly ap-
pealed to by the American Federation
of Labor to institute a federal investi-
gation. It is known the president has
given the matter much thought. He
is understood to have told President
Gempers and other labor leaders that
the situation is really up to congress.
Gompers refused to disclose, however,
whether the president indicated his in-
tention of urging congressional action.
British Enter German Trenches
Berlin, Dec. 4.-British troops in the
the sector of Ypres succeeded in en-
tering German advanced trenches, but
were later .repulsed. The British at-
tack was made after mine explosions.
The attackers were either overpower-
ed in hand to hand fighting, or re-
pulsed.
1 orward Greek Protest Against Allies
Washington, Dec. 4.-The state de-
partment will forward to the London
foreign office the protest of the Greek
government against alleged allied in-
fringements on Greece's neutrality
which was delivered Saturday, it was
said today. The note will probably be
sent without comment.
Attempt Mutiny on U. S. S. Aretheusa
Washington, Dec. 4.-Attempted
mutiny aboard the naval auxiliary
Aretheusa in which at least one
man has been killed has caused
the return of the vessel to Norfolk,
radio messages to the Norfolk
navy yard said today. The
Aretheusa had left Norfolk and
was proceeding to Boston when
the uprising occurred. She is ex-
pected in Hampton Roads tonight.
Naval tugs have been sent to meet
her and render any assistance
necessary.

forces which gained the north bank
of the Danube were crowned with
success," the statement continued.
"The Danube army and the army
grtoup of Lieut. Gen. Fuehne, advanc-
ing through the western Wallachian
territory beyond Crayova, and the
group of Lieut. Gen. Krafft von Del-
mnensin'en coming, after hard engage-
ments along the Argesul from the
mountains, and the German-Austro-
Hungarians coming by way of Cam-
pulung, have now joined hands be-
tween the Danube and the mountains.
"The left wing yesterday captured
Targoviste. The troops of General
Krafft von Delmensingen continued
their victorious march from Pipesci
and defeated completely the first Rou-
manian army beyond Tipu.
"On the west bank of the Argesul
and northwest and west of Bucharest,
the fighting continues successfully
progressing for our forces. Southwest
of the fortress of Bucharest, the Rou-
manians were repulsed toward the
Argesul. South of Bucharest, strong
Roumanian and Russian attacks were
repulsed. The Roumanian army suf-
fered the heaviest sanguinary losses.
To the thousands of prisoners already
captured, more than 8,000 were added
yesterday."
EXPECT NO OFFICIAL REPORT
ON MICHIGAN BORDER MUTINY
Thirty-Second Unit Stage "Want-to-
Go-Home" Demonstration;,
Officer Objects
Washington, Dec. 4.-War depart-
ment officials declared that no official
report had been received here of the
alleged mutiny of the Thirty-second
Michigan infantry Saturday, during
which Col. Lewis C. Covell, command-
ing, tore and silver eagles from his
shoulders and challenged the soldiers
"to meet him man to man" unless they
ceased their "disgraceful exhibition."
Major Douglass McArthur indicated
his belief that the incident never would
be reported officially.
El Paso dispatches telling of the
alleged mutiny said members of the
Thirty-second regiment staged a "ye-
want-to-go-home" demonstration, in
which the other Michigan units refused
to join. The disgruntled soldiers were
quieted without trouble.
Urge Investigation of Campaign Money
Washington, Dec. 4.-A bill for rigid
investigation of expenditures of all
money by all parties during the re-
cent presidential campaign and elec-
tion, with "immunity bath" and
"perjury" clauses, will be introduced
by Senator Owen of Oklahoma prob-
ably tomorrow, he announced today.
The bill will be introduced as a joint
resolution.

_.

0

0J

1917

O R D E R Y OU R
WICHIGANE

SIA

4

TO DAY
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