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December 03, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-03

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L r

THE WFEATHER
FOR ANN ARBOR-
SUNDAY--WARMER AND
PARTLY CLOUDY

It x
ILiAN

. ,..

nA.. W

UNITED PRESS WIRI
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
i ONLY lIORNING PAPER f
ANN ARBOR

VOL. XXVII. No. 54. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENT

PREDICT CABiNET
*UPSET IN BRITAIN
Premier Asqu1th's Long Conference
With King George Brings
Probable Climax
OBJECT TO PRESENT CABINET
By Ad. L. Green
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
London. Dec. 2.-Rumors of a pend-
ing cabinet upheaval which have been
occuring for the past few days, came
to a climax late today when it was
learned that Premier Asquith had held
a long conference with King George.
The evening newspapers almost
without exception subordinated the
war news to the discussion of the po-
litical situation. There were various
rumors ranging from the retirement
of Premier Asquith in favor of David
Lloyd-George, minister of war, to the
substitution of a council consisting of
Asquith, Law, Lloyd-George, Belfour,
and Sir Arthur Carson for the present
ministry.
Intense interest is manifested in
Monday's session of parliament. Sev-
eral members have given notice of
their intention to question the gov-
ernment regarding certain crises now
considered to have been. reached in the
conduct of the war, and of the in-
ternal administration, if no announce-
ment is made before that time.
There is much dissatisfaction against
the present cabinet, which in some,
quarters has developed into bitter
vituperation. The general charge has
been an inaptitude in the conduct oft
the war. j
RECEPTION FOR FOREIGN
STUDENTS SUCCESSFUL

.Order Attack on fl[MN CHuS
Chihuahua Ci4yE i CHOSEN
Carran ista Fo-rces to Make Effort tol IN PEACE CONTEST

J

Wrest City From
Villa

El Paso, Dec. 2.-An immediate as-
sault by Carranzista forces upon Chi-
huahua City in an effort to wrest pos-
session of the city from Villa has
been ordered, it was learned tonight.
The massed forces of Generals Tre-
vino,. Murgia, and Ozuma are now
within striking distance of the north-
ern Mexico capital, it was stated.
A detachment of Villa's forces or-
dered south by the bandit leader to
inter cept and halt the advance of Mur-
gia's column was badly defeated yes-
terdf tin a six-hour engagement with
government troops, it was announced
at the Mexican consulate here.dHeavy
losses were suffered by both sides.
Villa's detachment was forced to re-
tire, abandoning several machine guns.
Authentic information was obtained
that at least 80 tChinese had been
clubbed to death after the capture of
Chihuahua City by the Villistis. Villa
is said to :have ordere'd his men to use
the butts of their guns in order to save
ammunition. Early tonight no news
of the fate of the six Americans known
to ha ve been in the northern capital
had been obtained.
foisons Haney
Jar- Then Flees
Amt Arbor Youth Seeks Rcenge on
Stepfather, After Being
Punished
After pouring carbolic acid into the
gamily ;honey jar, Einar Glazier, a loc-
al school boy 11 years of agP, ran
raway from home. It is believed that
the boy intended to poison his step-
father, who had administered a beat-
ing to the boy for some misdeed.
Tlie boy's mother detected the odor
of the acid yesterday morning and,
later found a note in which the lad
annouinced his intention of running
away to seek his fortune. Up to a
late hour last night the boy had not
been found.
TWO .KILLED IN RACE WON
BY -CIEVROLET AT UNIONTOWN

Winners of Three Trials Yesterday to
Compete for Honors
Decp. 14
VICTOR SPEARS IN HILLSDALE
Five men were yesterday chosen in
the elimination peace contests which
were given in rooh 302, Mason hall,
to compete in the final University con-
test to be held Dec. 14, in University
hall.4
In the contest held at 10 o'clock yes-
terday morning, J. R. Simpson, '18,
was chosen winner. In the afternoon
contest at 4 o'clock, H. B. Teegarden,
'17, and James Schermerhorn, Jr., '18,
were the successful contestants, and
in the 7 o'clock contest, Lois May, '18,
and Colenel Brown, '19, were select-
ed.
The winning orations will be re-
turned to the men for their revision
and these revised orations will be
given in the final University contest.
The winner will compete in the
state contest at Hillsdale, and the vic-
tor in this meet will enter the inter-
state contest. The final elimination
will be held at the Lake Mohawk con-
ference, when the winners of the In-

Illuminate Statue of Liberty
New York, Dec. 2.--With ceremonies participated in by President
Wilson representing America, and Ambassador Jusserand France, the
Statue of Liberty was given a new impressiveness tonight by the
installation of a set of lights that made the famous figure in New
York harbor stand out even more boldly by night than by day.
The booming of big guns in the presidential salute, the dart-
ing the sky of an illuminated aeroplane piloted by Miss Ruth Law,
and rays of the world's most powerful searchlight added thrills, as
the president's yacht came to rest near the base of the statue.
The president gave the signal for turning on of the lights. Sus-
tained cheering burst through the throng that lined the streets lead-
ing into Bowling Green 4s Liberty suddenly stood forth high and
clear against the darkness of the harbor. Another great roar greeted
the return of 'the president's yacht and the landing of his party,
which went by auto to the Waldorf-Astoria.

ROMANIANSHOLD
MACKNSENALONG
OBRUOJAN FRONT

ItI.A Sl:t )S F OR
1UCITAREST AS
'O ALLIES

C E S
AID

IN'

terstate
contest.

contests meet in a nationalI

President Harry B.
Deans Hosts at
Event

Hutchins
Annual

andI

Over 150 foreign students attended1
the reception given last night by Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins and the deansx
of the various departments in Bar-l
hour gymnasium.,
"It is certainly an inspiring sight
to look out upon students coming from
33 foreign countries," said President
11u1hins. "Michigan, almost from the
first, has been cosmopolitan."
Dean V. C. Vaughan of the Medical
School gave a short talk on the suc-
cess of foreign students in the scien-
tific world and expressed a wish that
all foreign students attending the Uni-
versity would strive to attain the high-
est standards.
S. J. Chuan, secretary of the Chinese
Students' Christian association of
North America, said a few words o%1
the promotion of a better understani-
ing of international relations betwe en
the different countries.
The other speakers of the everning
were: Dr. N. S. Hardikar, ChonjQ F.
Tang, '18M, L. M. Pebayle, F9/,J.
Charnock and Mits7-iji Kiyohara. '17.
South African jungle yells wefre led
by Clifton Maree, '17D, and A. A.
Seele, '17D. Refreshments were served
after the program.
PRESIDENT WILSON MAY ASK
ACTION ON FOOD PRICES
Washington, Dec. 2.-Pr(sid ent Wil-
son has instructed all departmentt
which are investigating the soaring of
food prices to submit d.etailed reports
to him, it was learned tonight. If
these reports warrant it, he may urge
congressional action of the question at
the coming session in his message
Tuesday or in a special message to
congress at a later date.
N. C. Fetter Attends State Conferen e
N. C. Fetter, secretary of theUn i-
versity "Y," is in Lansing this week-
end attending the state boys' confe r-
ence.

Cars Dr.iven by Galvin and
Collide at Finish of
Contest

HughesI

WILL HOLD MEETING To
Y. . C. A. to Endeavor to Interest
University in Foreign Re-
lief Service
In order to further plans for Y.
M. C. A. prison camp work, a meeting
will be held for this purpose on Wed-
nesday, Dec. 6, in Hill auditorium. If
sufficient interest is shown, the stu-
dent council will take charge of the
work.
The committee now at the head of
the affair has obtained C. W. White-
hair, secretary of the Cornell Uni-
versity "Y," and efforts are being made
to bring David R. Porter of New York
,ity here for the mass meeting.
When asked for his views in regard
to the prison work movement, Dean
John R. Effinger gave his hearty ap-
proval to the plan. In part, he said:"
"So far the student body of the Uni-
versity of Michigan has done very lit-
tle for these movements. The eastern
colleges raised large sums last year
for ambulance and hospital work in
France.
"Michigan has showed no interest
in this line of work. But, perhaps, it
was because the plan was not pre-
sented to the campus in the proper
style. I think that it would be to the
benefit of the students to get behind
the movement and make it worth
while."
League Secretary to Lecture on Navy
W. M.; Lewis, secretary for the mid-
dlewest of the Navy league, will give
a stereopticon lecture as a pictoral re-
view of the United States navy, Wed-
nesday evening, Dec. 13, in the audi-
torium of the natural science building,
under the auspices of the Navy league
of America. Mr. Lewis has given the
same talk at the University of Illinois,
Culver academy, and other universities
and colleges of the country.

1917 MICHIGAENSIAN TO
SOLICIT SUBSCRIPTIONS
Fllow System Adopted Last Year in
Obtaining Orders for Official
Year Book
Beginning Tuesday, the Michigan-
ensian will launch its subscription
campaign which will extend over a
period of. four days. The system in-
augurated last winter, securing an in-
crease in subscriptions of 30 per cent
over the year before, will be em-
ployed again this year.
Tables will be located in various
buildings; those in University hall and
the general library being permanent
for the four days, while the tables sit-
uated in the engineering building will
remain there only Tuesday, Wednes-
day, and Thursday. One table will be
in the law building, Tuesday; medic
building, Wednesday; dental building,
Thursday, and economics building, Fri-
day.
Along with every order a 50 cent de-
posit must be made as an assurance
that the book will be taken upon de-
livery. As is customary, there will be
an advance of 50 cents in the price of
the year book to all those failing to
take advantage of the opportunity of-
fered for subscribing during the cam-
paign.
Work on the Michiganensian is al-
ready well under way, but as a pre-
caution against any possible delay in
the future, the editors of the year
book urge all seniors to have their
pictures taken at once and all organ-
izations to forward contracts as soon
as possible.
"Y" EMPLOYMENT BUREAU FILLS
800 STUDENT APPLICATIONS
Over 800 jobs have been given out
by the "Y" employment bureau of-
fice during the past two months. The
jobs consist of steady and odd work.
The employment office will be open
during the holiday vacation. Students
desiring positions should call the bu-
reau during the hours that the office
is open. Those that want to go out of
town, and who have steady jobs can
find others to take their places by com-
municating with the association office.
Fire Department Answers Two Calls
Two alarms were responded to by
the fire department yesterday. Fire,
ignited by a spark from the chimney,
did slight damage to the roof of the
building at 405 North Main street at
8:30 o'clock in the morning. At 6
o'clock the department extinguished a
blaze in the basement of the home of
Frank C. Painter, 1302 Packard street.
No material damage was done.

MASQUES PREPARE1PLY
FOR THURSDAY PROGRAM
Dramatic Society to Present Comedy,
"The Worsted Man," at Glee
Club Entertainment
"The Worsted Man," which Masques
is to present next Thursday night in
Hill auditorium in the combined en-
tertainment with the Girls' Glee club,
is passing 'rapidly through the final
stages of rehearsal under the direction
of Prof. J. R. Brumm of the rhetoric
department.
The ten members of the cast are
working hard, and John Kendrick
Bangs' amusing and original little
playlet is already beginning to show
the proper sparkle. No small part of
the attractiveness of the "comedietta"
is contributed by the choruses with
their snappy jingles and well known
Gilbert and Sullivan airs.
Elsa Apfel, '17, is leading man, as
Mr. Woolley, the pillow-headed flirt
from Afghanistan, and Inez Gose, '17,
plays opposite, in the role of Im-
patience Willoughby. About 20 mem-
bers of Masques will take part in the
production, while the chorus is com-
posed partly of Glee club girls.
Masques is an honarary dramatic
society for girls which was founded
in 1913 to assist the dramatic commit-
cec of the Woman's league. There are
at present about 30 members. Helen
Champion, '17, is president.
"JMIXER" MEETS WITH SUCCESS
Couples Crowd Barbour Gymnasium
at Benefit Party
Nearly 250 couples crowded Bar-
hour gymnasium at the "mixer" given
by the Women's Athletic association
yesterday afternoon to raise money for
the new club house on Palmer field.
About $125 was realized by the dance.
The party was chaperoned by Prof.
R. T. Crane and Mrs. Crane, Mr. and
Mrs. W. 0. Raymond, Miss Alice Ev-
ans, Mis Wood, and Miss Dawley.
Catholic Students' Dance Successful
The first dance of the year by the
Catholic Students' club at the Packard
academy was one of success in every
way. Prof. Thomas J. MacKavan-
augh, assistant professor of electrical
engineering, and -Mrs. MacKavanaugh
were the chaperones. The members of
the social committee were Kenneth
Doyle, '17L, E. George, '17, Leo Covey,
'17L, J. Donnelly, '18L, Blanche Covey,
'17, and Angela Rademacher, '17.
Whitney, '17E, Shows Improvement
Steady improvement is being noted
in the condition of John H. Whitney,
'17E, who is confined at St. Joseph's
sanitorium suffering from slight con-
cussion of the brain following an auto-
mobile accident Friday morning. The
physician in charge stated that at his
present rate of improvement Whitney
would be discharged from the hos-
pital Monday.
Glass Works Grant Increased Pay
Beginning Dec. 16, the American
Window Glass company will give a 10
per cent increase in the wages of all
its employees.

ADMIT WITHDRAWAL IN WEST
l4reek Situation Trying Battle Fol-
lows Landing of Body of
French Marines
Bucharest, Roumania, Dec. 2.-Bit-
ter fighting on all fronts was detailed
in tonight's official statement. "In
western Moldavia and northern Wal-
lachia there were infantry attacks and
:2rtillery bombardments," said the of-
flcial statement. "In the valley o
Damcozitza we retreated south. In the
region of Pitesci we were violently
attacked and slightly retreated. On
the D~obrudjin front we have made a.
violent offensive, at some points pass-
lug the enemy's entanglements."
See Effect of Russian Drives.
London. Dec. 2.---Russia is showing
her mightiest blows to save Roumania.
Various attacks of massed forces were
reported tonight, according to dis-
patches from the Roumanian front. Al-
ready it is asserted here that the ef-
fect of the czar's tremendous offensive
against the Bulgarian-German forces
on the Transylvanian and Dobrktdja
fronts has born fruit in strengthening
the Roumanian resistance against
1i0ld Marshal Mackensen's forces ad-
vancing north of Bucharest.
The German statement mentioned
also heavy Russian reinforcements
moving forward into Bucharest.
A Petrograd statement late today ad-
mitted the pressure of the German
drive in the valley of the Arges had
forced a portion of the Roumanian de-
Senders to return slightly south of the
river, and asserted all their attcks
were repulsed. Roumanian gains in
the PuAzen valley southeast of Kron-
stadt and on the road to Tepes were
reported. Berlin stated that "the situ-
ation in Roumania developed in our
favor."
Greeks Show Change of Mind.
London, Dec. 2.- -Greece's stay of
grace beyond the time limit set by 4d-
miral De Sournet for disarmament,
was a bloody reign which culminated
in a complete reversal of the Greek
governmental policy, according to
meagre dispatches tonight. The last
dispatches said an armistice has been
arranged, the French admiral agree-
ing to withdraw his troops at King
Constantine's promise to surrender six
batteries with mounted artillery.
Before the agreement was con-
cluded, there were half a dozen pitched
battles in the street between allied
troops and Greek reservists. The ex-
act extent of the casualties in these
riots is not known, but is believed to
total more than a hundred.
The time limit set by De Sournet
zor compliance with the allied de-
mands for surrender of arms expires
Thursday. The French naval com-
mander, surprised that King Con-
stantine had decided on refusal, never-
theless granted the government an-
other 24 hours, but at the same time
began concentration of his forces. It
was the landing of the French marines
that touched off the spell of riots.
Co-operative Stores Lower Prices
Washington, Dec. 2.--Co-operative
stores in rural communities generally
tend to lower prices, agriculture de-
partment experts have found in an ex-
tensiveninvestigation, but poor man-
agement of such enterprises has re-
sulted in their failure in many cases
and has emphasized the necessity for
careful business methods where co-
operative selling is undertaken.

Praise Americai as French War Hero
Paris. Dec. 2.-Julian Allen of Nevw
York City, a former student at St.
Paul's school, is cited in army orders
"for having volunteered to transport
wounded requiring urgent care from
relief posts to hospitals over a route,
in sight of the enemy, frequently
shelled and swept by machine gun
lir -a fine example of bravery and en-
du rance."

Uniontownf, Pa., Dec. 2.- Louis
Chevrolet this afternoon won the Uni-
',ersal trophy race at the U. S. A.
speedway here, driving his machine
at an average speed of 92 miles an
hour. Dave Lewis finished second and
Ralph de Palma, third.
The race was marked by the death
of Hughie Hughes, one of the coun-
try's most noted drivers.. He was
killed when Frank Galvin's machine
crushed into Hughes', driving it
through the press stand at the finish.
Two persons were killed, two fatally
injured and a score more hurt, many
of them seriously, in the crash. The
dead were Hughie Hughes and Gaston
Weigle, mechanican for Galvin. Galvin
and Elmer Putman of Uniontown were
fatally injured.
Prof. J. J. Cox to Direct Road Work
Prof. J. J. Cox of the civil engineer-
inj department has been engaged by
the district road board to take charge
of road plans for an entire year, be-
ginning Jan. 1. He will direct the or-
ganixation of that branch of the work
and its maintenance.
Scott, 15L, Gets Minnesota Position
John. F. Scott, '15L, has just been
appointed assistant district attorney
of Minresota. While at Michigan he
was an editor of the Michigan Law
Review, and an associate editor of the
Michiganensian.

Presbyterian Church
HURON and DIVISION STS.
DR. JAMES A. MACDONALD
Toronto Globe
"THE NORTH AMERICAN IDEA"
Tonight 7:30 o'clock
- -.-

BAR tCORDUROYS AT DANCE

UI

:k
M

Corduroys will be absent at
the first dance of the junior
engineers which is to be held,
next Friday evening, Dec. 8, at..
the Packard academy. The sign-.
nificant name of the "Slide Rule.
Shuffle" has been assigned to-,
this party.

*
*
*
:*
*k
*
*

EMMA
LITERARY CRITIC
ANTON TCHEKHOV. (TheIdealist.)
FYODOR DOSTOYEVSKY. (The
Psychologist of Misery and Pove-
rty.
LEO TOLSTOY. (Artist and Pro-
phet.)

GOLDMAN
LECTURES ON
MICHAEL ARTZIBASHEV.( The
Liberator of Sex.)
LEONID ANDREYEV. (The Icono-
clast.)
MAXIM GORKY. (The Voice of
Revolt.)

11511 11
' uLII
10.3-ommuni~on Service. a~11
7:30- What Is Conscience?
uIE

Modern Woodmnan Hali
Cor. Main xnd Washington Admission 25c

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