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December 02, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-02

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THE WEATHER
FOR ANN ARBOR-
SATURDAY-GENERALLY FAIR
NO ChANGE IN TEMPERATURE

OP.
.. q. Z
> s
p
R'

UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
T E ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

6.

VOL XXVII. No. 53. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1916. PRICE FIVE CEN

GERMS CONTINU
TO PRESSFORWAR
Heated Fighting Develops Along En-
tire Dobrudjan Line With
Honors Equal
BRITISH WIN IN EAST AFRICA
London, Dec. 1.-The Germans con-
tinue to advance in their drive on
Bucharest. Only by some tremendous
burst of resistance can the Rouman-
fans hope to keep the central aljied
forces out of the previous capital of
their country. Their opposition dur-
ine the day was, however, slightly
more stubborn.
As the Germans advanced they
found parts of the country from which
the native forces had retreated re-
asuming their peaceful activities. The
sepulchers of the Roumain kings fell
into German hands at the conquest of
Curtea de Artes. The German em-
peror ordered that the tombs be given
special protection by the troops, and
that in the march to the city, wreaths
should be displayed on the sepulchers.
Reports from War Theaters.
Reports from the various other
fronts are as follows:
SouthAfrica: British report vic-
tory over the Germans in German East
Africa. The surrender of a large force
was a severe loss to the enemy.
Dobrudja front: Violent fighting
marked the passage of the day along
the entire front. Von Mackensen's
forces drove forward gaining some ad-
vantage over their enemies toward the
east of the line, while on the west the
central allied troops met with such
determined resistance that they were
forced to retreat.
Macedonian front: The allied pow-
ers report sanguinary losses to the
Bulgarian-German foree's attempting
to take Serbian positions northwest of
Grunitza. Berlin reports no success-
ful allied attempts to advance in the
Fsame district.
Somme front: Comparative quiet
reigned along the Somme front today.
Artillery fire north of the Ancre was
the chief feature.
10000 Belgians Already Deported.
Washington, Dec. 1.-Ten thousand
f Belgians have been deported to Ger-
many to date. Three thousand are
now being deported daily and many
are being put to work constructing
lines into Germany, according to in-
formation received by the Belgian am-
bassador.
Hint at German U-Bots.
Washington, Dec. 1.-Reports that
two German submarines broke through
the British cordon and headed for
American waters are persistently con-
tinued. While no ships have reported
sighting the subsea fighters, it is be-
lieved that the British government's
previous warnings to the Canadian
coast and British owned vessels has
been made more otringent.
Late News Briefs
Washington, Dec. 1.-That San Do-
mingo will appeal to the A. B. C.
powers of South American regarding
the action of the United States in de-
claring martial law and military gov-
ernment in the republic, was the be-
lief expressed in official circles.
Washington, Dee. 1.-Cattle held in
quarantine at the Kansas City stock
yards are not infected with the dreaded
foot and mouth disease, it was official-

ly reported today.
Washington, Dec. 1.-Regarding gov-
ernment employees being entitled to
more pay because of the increased
living costs, Public Printer Ford to-
day declared he was in favor of an
organization to get a raise from the
government.
Waco, Texas, Dec. 1.-T. R. Watson,
president of the Farmers and Mer-
chants bank of Teague, Texas, who
shot and killed Bank Commissioner
John Patterson several weeks ago, just
after Patterson had posted a notice
closing the bank, was convicted and
sentenced today to 99 years imprison-
ment.
Civic Association Men Meet at Union
The board of directors of the Ann
Arbor Civic association held a meet-
ing at the Michigan Union last night.
Severa imnortant auestions were dis-

Asks Reformation
For Progressives
Active Group Urges Reorganization of
Party With Several Well Known
Members Left Out
New York, Dec. 1.-Reorganization
of the Progressive party, with sev-
eral well known members, including
George W. Perkins, left out, is the pur-
pose of an active group of party mem-
bers now at work. The Afternoon
Mail said today, "The plan calls for a
meeting in St. Louis in January."
John Robert Taylor, Progressive
state committeeman from Brooklyn,
who is one of the sponsers of the re-
organization plan, is quoted as declar-
ing he wants those who want reor-
ganization to sign pledges.
TO USE COURTROOM PRACTICE
Webster Debating Society Introduces
New Feature
For the first time in the history of
the Webster Debating society practic-
al courtroom practice was introduced
as a permanent feature of the weekly
program at its regular meeting in the
club rooms last night. A large number
of members were present and unusual
interest was displayed in the working
out of the innovation.
The new feature directly supple-
ments and puts into practice the ma-
terial developed in the daily classroom
discussions. Sometime before each
meeting a set of facts relating to some
dispute, and the legal question en-
volved are posted on the club bulletin
board and at the meeting opposing at-
torneys argue their respective sides
before a judge.
This gives the underclassmen, or any
others who wish to take part, practical
work along their chosen line as well
as practice in speaking before an au-
dience.
The question argued last evening
was "Will equity compel specifiec per-
formance of a contract for the sale of
shares of stocks in a corporation?" A
set of. facts were given the debaters
and some cases which applied on the
question envolved and upon this they
based their arguments.
The new work is in charge of A. P.
Bogue, '18L, L. W. Forbus, '18L, and
J. A. Tolonen, '17L, who make up the
program committee.

STUDENT HURT AS
AUTO HITS TRAIN

John H. Whitney, '17E,
cussion of Brain;

Suffers Con-
Others

Slightly Injured

Time Needed In Marina Case
Washington, Dec. 1.-The action this government will take in
the case of the sinking by a German submarine of the British horse
transport Marina with the loss of six American lives,' will depend
upon whether the ship was actually in the service of the British gov-
ernment.
This was intimated officially late today, following a conference
between President Wilson and Secretary Lansing lasting nearly two
hours. As a result, the Marina case promises to be several months
in solving. There are some six or eight governments involved. This
grows out of the fact that the ship was at one time used as a gov-
ernment transport. The fact that Germany has questioned whether
the Marina was not still under "public service," the classification
when attacked has brought up almost endless questions regarding
what is meant by "public service."

CONPLETE PLANS
FOR REPULSE OF
VILLA AT JUAREI

STREET LAMPS BLIND DRIVER
John H. Whitney, '17E, is in St.
Joseph's sanitorium suffering from a
slight concussion of the brain and
injuries to his nose and head sus-
tained when the automobile he was
riding in with three other young men
'crashed into a freight train at 2:30
o'clock yesterday morning.
William Schaible had several teeth
knocked out and suffered other minor
injuries, and Vernie Kerr, son of a
local printer, hd a knee-cap frac-
tured. Donald B. Darling, '19, the
driver of the car, a son of Dr. C. C.
Darling of the medical school, was
the only member of the party who
escaped unhurt.
According to Darling, the party was
driving out to the western part of the
city to take Kerr home. The Ann Ar-
bor railroad crosses Liberty street at
the foot of a hill, where two street
lamps are placed. The glare of these
lights made it impossible for the
driver to see a string of flat cars
which were being shunted across the
street and the machine collided with
the train while running at a fair rate
of speed. The car, which was new,
was wrecked.
Whitney was rendered unconscious
by the shock. He was removed to St.
Joseph's where he later recovered con-
sciousness. His condition was stated
last night to be improving.
Shortly before the accident Irvin
Heusel had been dropped from the
car. Hausel was one of the two mem-
bers of a party of seven who survived
an automobile accident at Sandusky,
0., last summer, when Don Stark and
four others were killed.
GIVES BLOOD TO ARCHBOLD
Chauffeur of Standard Oil Magnate
Allows Transfusion
Tarrytown, N. Y., Dec. 1.-John D.
Archbold, president of the Standard
Oil company of New Jersey and ac-
tive head of the Standard interests,
is dangerously ill here, although his
condition is somewhat better than it
was 24 hours ago.
Mr. Archbold was operated upon for
appendicitis a week ago and for a
time seemed to rally -from the effects
of the operation, but later suffered a
relapse. The five physicians who
have been attending him since his ill-
ness began decided that blood trans-
fusion must be resorted to if his
strength was to be restored.
Several persons volunteered to give
their blood to aid the oil magnate, but
tests which were made eliminated
them, one by one. The last whose
blood was tested was Mr. Archbold's
chauffeur and it was found he
answered all the requirements.
While no official information regard-
ing the operation was obtainable at
the Archbold home, it is said to have
been performed by Dr. Edward Linde-
man and Dr. George E. Brewer. Soon
after the operation Mr. Archbold
showed increased strength and his
physicians appeared optimistic, believ-
ing that the improvement would prove
permanent. Mrs. Archbold was re-
ported to have collapsed under the
strain of her husband's illness and to
be under a physician's care herself.
John D. Rockefeller, who hd plan-
ned to go to Lakewood, N. J., postpon-
ed his trip because of Mr. Archbold's
condition. Both he and William Rock-
efeller are being informed at frequent
intervals of their associate's condition.
John F. Archbold said that his fath-
er's condition appeared to be about the
same as it had been since the blood
transfusion operation was performed.

CARRANZISTAS BELIEVE
WILL NOT MAKE
TACK ON CITY
GARRISON NUMBERS

BANDI
AT-

1,

WILL RECEIVE TONIGH
FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS
President Hutchins and Means of De-
partmients to be in Charge
of Affair
President Harry B. Hutchins and the
deans of the various departments will
hold the reception for all foreign stu-
dents of the University at 8 o'clock to-
night in Barbour gymnasium. About
200 invitations have been sent out and
it is expected that every foreign stu-
dent on the campus will be present.
the board of advisors to foreign stu-
dents, is in charge of the program,
which includes singing, recitations,
and a variety of novel acts by some of
the students. Each nation represent-
ed in the University will plan to be
represented on the program in some
manner.
Mr. Chuan, national secretary to
Chinese students in America, will
speak to the Chinese students in New-
berry hall preceding the reception in
Barbour gymnasium. At the close of
Mr. Chuan's talk, the Chinese students
will accompany him to the entertain-
ment.
All foreign students are cordially
invited to this reception, whether they
have failed to receive invitations or
not.
MEDIATION BOARD TO SETTLE
SOUTHERN RAIL STRIKE ISSUE
Nashville, Dec. 1.-The services of
the federal board of mediation and
conciliation have been asked for by
President Peyton of the Nashville,
Chattanooga & St. Louis railway, to
adjust a controversy with the road's
employees, which already has resulted
in the brotherhood members voting
overwhelmingly in favor of a strike.
Brotherhood officials did not join in
the request for mediation, but indi-
cated that they will not oppose it.
Judge W. L. Chambers of the fed-
eral board replied that immediate
steps will be taken to begin mediation
proceedings.
The appeal for federal mediation
followed an exchange of several com-
munications between President Pey-
ton and the brotherhood leaders. The
latter notified the road yesterday that
more than 90 per cent of the brother-
hood members had voted to strike, and
added, that if a satisfactory reply were
not forthcoming by 6 o'clock they were
prepared to put into effect the wishes
of their men.
Michigan Leads in 'Hunting Fatalities'
Lansing, Mich., Dec. 1.--Michigan
again led the country in hunting fatal-
ities, the close of the deer season show-
ing 25 deaths and 1b serious injuries
already reported, which later reports
may swell to equal the record of 1913,
when 28 hunters were slain in this
state.
The one-deer law dropped the totals
of last year, but during the past four
seasons 88 men have been killed in
Michigan. Most of the accidents are
due to carelessness.

NEILSON TO GIE TALK
ON DPLMAY ND WAR
English Statesman Has Been Familiar
with Inside History of
War
Francis Neilson, an ex-member of
parliament and English statesman,
will speak in University Hall Wed-
nesday, Dec. 6, on the subject, "How
Diplomats Make War."
Mr. Neilson has been in a position
to know the inner workings of the
diplomatic circles in the present Eu-
ropean strife. He has been in Ann
Arbor several times before and has
always created favorable comment.
Last year he delivered a lecture on
the problems of reconstruction after
the war, and will in the coming lec-
ture consider some of the new phases
which have somewhat changed the
problem since his last appearance
here.
The lecture is given under the
auspices of the Oratorial association,
and is one of the series of addresses
that the association is arranging this
winter.
TRIAL OF GERMAN PLOTTERS
SET FOR MONDAY IN FRISCO
San Francisco, Dec. 1.-Subjoening
of witnesses for the trial of Franz
Bopp, German consul-general at San
Francisco, and four members of his
official family, charged with breaches
of neutrality in connection with an al-
leged bomb conspiracy, has begun.
John W. Preston, United States dis-
trict attorney, said about 25 men and
women would be summoned. The case
is set for Monday. Mr. Preston said
several witnesses would come from
New York.
Immunity, he said, would not be
given Johannes von Koolbergen, the
so-called "double spy," who if he ap-
pears will be a defendant and not a
witness..
Louis J. Smith, said to have been in
the employ of the German officials; has
been granted immunity.
In addition to Bopp, those to be
tried are E. H. von Shack, German
vice-consul; William von Bricken, at-
tache; Charles C. Crowley, detective
for the German consulate, and Mrs.
Margaret W. Cornell, Crowley's secre-
tary.
It is alleged von Koolbergen was em-
ployed by German officials to dyna-
mite bridges, tunnels, and stations in
Canada. The German officials deny
the allegation, holding that the man
was a British spy. Van Koolbergen
recently was released from a prson
in Alberta, Canada, where he served
a sentence for forgery,
Five Tons of Food in Prison Feast
Jackson, Mich., Dec. 1.-Five tons
of food were reuired for the Thanks-
giving dinner for the 980 inmates of
Jackson prison. Motion pictures also
marked the holiday. The amount of
rations consumed was 1,200 pounds
chicken, 600 pounds dressing, 50 bush-
els potatoes, 100 gallons gravy, 10
cases canned corn, -18 bushels apples,
300 pumpkin pies, 3,000 cookies, 150
gallons tea, 50 gallons jelly, and 800
pounds bread.

NEW, YORK WILL HAVE FIRST
DIAGNOSIS HOSPITAL IN U.

S.1

New York, Dec. 1.-The first di-
agnostic hospital in the country will
be erected in this city at a cost of
$200,000, the Diagnostic society of New
York announced last night. The pur-
pose will be to provide expert diag-
nosis of all cases brought to it. It
will look over a patient suffering from
an unidentified ailment, find out what
is the matter with him and direct him
to a specialist if he can afford it; if
not, he will be sent back to the gen-
eral practitioner under whose care he
has been with a complete diagnosis
of his disease, a plan for treating it
suggested by competent specialists,
and references to recent literature on
the subject.
FOUR ARMORED CRUISERS OF
U. S. NAVY HAVE NEW NAMES
San Diego, Cal., Dec.' 1.-Three
armored cruisers of the Pacific fleet
and one of the Atlantic fleet are known
by new names today.
The cruiser Maryland will be known
as the Frederick. the Colorado will
be the Pueblo, and the West Virginia
will be the Huntington. The cruiser
Washington will be renamed the Seat-
tle. State names of the vessels will
be given to super-dreadnaughts now
Order Freight Caf Redistribution
Washington, Dec. 1.-Nation-wide
redistribution of box cars is required
by a new order agreed upon by the
railroad conference committee.

Refugee Reports One of Principal
Streets of Chihuahua City
Scene of Fire
El Paso, Dec. 1.-Every precaution
had been so well taken care of late to-
day in the case of an attack by Villa,
that the Carranza officials declared
they did not believe an attack will be
made on the border city. General
Gonzales, commander at Juarez, an-
nounced this afternoon that several
more troop trains with survivors of
the Chihuahua City battle are enroute
to the border.
Today the Juarez garrison numbers
1,800 men, and within 24 hours General
Gonzales will have 2,500 more under
his command to "harrass and cut off
any advance that Villa may make, and
we will have 500 men along the rail-
way line between the border and Chi-
huahua City. These measures are
only precautionary, as we do not ex-
pect an attack."
At the Mexican consulate here, it
was announced that Generals May-
cotte and Trevino had merged their
commands and would advance to at-
tack the Villistas from the north and
east. When the second train reached
the border with the refugees came
General Trevino's private car and a
fiat ,car bearing Trevino's family auto-
mobile. Reports are current in Juarez
that the commander himself had
slipped to the border, but confirma-
tion of these reports were impossible
to obtain.
Juarez Merchants Move Goods
El Paso[. Dec. 1.--In anticipation of
an attack by Villistas, the merchants
of Juarez are today moving their
stores of merchandise to the American
side of the border. In one lot, there
were 6,000 sacks of flour which was
shipped to Juarez only a few days
ago.
Another lot. 25 carloads of merchan-
dise, was ordered back to the Ameri-
can side of the border. Spaniards in
the Mexican border town continue to
leave their homes and are moving to
the American side.
Carranza's Palace on Fire, Report.
El Palso, Dec. 1.-A principal resi-
dence street in Chihuahua City is in
flames, declared a Spaniard named
Nuela, who reached the border by auto
this afternoon, after escaping from a
captured crowd Wednesday night. Car-
ranza's palace is one of the buildings
on fire. Nuela knew nothing of the six
Americans known to have been in the
city.
CANADIAN GIRLS PRESENT
AMERICAN CARPS WITH AUTO
Toronto, Dec. 1.-Through the aid of
a large committee of pretty Canadian
girls the Two Hundred and Thirteenth
battalion, generally called the Amei'ic-
an Legion, was presented with a splen-
did motor ambulance to take overseas
with them.
When it was published that the Two
Hundred and Thirteenth needed an am-
bulance, a body of young women known
as "The Kanadian Knitting klub," vol-
unteered their services to help, and-,
from this beginning, an organization of
grils sprang up which gave a special
benefit day at Scarborough beach, re-
sulting in enough money to have a
splendidly equipped ambulance special-
ly built. This bears the inscription:
"From the Canadian girls who ap-
preciate the spirit of the American
boys, who have come over to help in
the fight for civilization."
FIRE DEPARTMENT PUTS OUT
BLAZE AT EREMITES' HOUSE

The fire department was called out
at 7:30 o'clock last night to extinguish
a small blaze on the roof of the
Eremites' house, 1335 South State
street. The fire, which started from
the chimney, was put out with the
chemical apparatus. The damage was
slight.

Tuesday, December 5th, 8 P. M.
MAXIM GORKY. (The Voice of
Revolt.)
Wednesday, December 6th, 4:15 P. M.
LEONID ANDREYEV. (The Icono-
clast.)
Thursday, December 7th, 4:15 P. M.
MICHAEL ARTZIBASHEV. (The
Liberator of Sex:)

Literary Critic m
EMMA

Anarchist

GOLDMAN

Monday, December 4th, 4:15 P. M.
The Life and Struggle of Russian
Literature.
LEO TOLSTOY. (Artist and Pro-
phet.).
Monday, December 4th, 8 P. M.
FYODOR DOSTOYEVSKY. (The
Phycliologist of Misery and Pov-
Tuesday, December 5th, 4:15 P. M.
ANTON TCHEKHOV. (The Ideal-
ist.)

Modern Woodman Hall

Cor. Main and Washington

Admission 25#

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