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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 01, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TF

HIGH

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1I61dd'll

.

THANKSGIVING

I LY N D O N 719 N. University
THE ONE PHOTOGRAPHER

FRESH E

A Season of Good Things

At this time of the year, with good things
in abundance,'how about Your Clothes?
Why don't you get ready for the Holidays?
An all-wool suit or overcoat, individually cut and hand-
tailored to your individual measure, will be both sensible
and seasonable, and will give you something good for
the holidays.

Who delivers the Goods and has
been delivering them for 12 years
right here among Michigan Students

GYM

SUPPLIES

I

Kod aIs
&ad
suxpplies

Gusaranteed
.A~mstt~I

Order now while our showing is complete, and have
that Suit or Overcoat in time for Thanksgiving.

TS TO ORDER

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE

J. K. MALCOLM

4 E. Liberty St.

Malcolm Block

Phone 1713-M

SE N I

OR S
Sit Early For Your MICHIGANENSIAN"
PICTURE AT
619 E. Liberty St.
Ann Arbor, - - Mieh.
Perfect Portraitures

Unsurpassed Accomodations for
Group Phonographs.
"Amateur Work Handled in a Pro-
fessional Way.
MAIN STUDIOS 1546-48 Broadway New York, N. Y.
YELLOW BONNET TAXI CO.

PHONE 2255

- f 7
T HIS message is for you-
meaning every member of
your family. From lace cur-
tains to your shirts acid co'lars,
table linens and all of your wear-
ing apparel will be properly laun-
dered if they are sent to this shop.
We'll convince you.

COUNT TO CROSS
France and England to Consider Case
at the Suggestion of the
United States
DENIAL WOULD CREATE PROBLEM

Laundry

one 2355

204 No. Main 3t

-. I

~ f

f

WHAT' S GOING ON

i

Today.
4 o'clock-Fresh lit football prac-
tice.
4 o'clock-Rehearsal of the Chinese
act of "The Magic Carpet" at Sarah
Caswell Angell hall.
Tomorrow.
9 o'clock-Meeting of the executive
board of the Independent Girls' club
in Barbour gymnasium.
2:30 o'clock-All-campus mixer at
Barbour gymnasium.
2:30 to 5:30-Catholic Students'
dance at Packard academy.
2 o'clock - Sophomore engineer-
fresh lit football game.
Graduates of 89 Schools on Faculty
Seattle, Wash., Nov. 30.-Eighty-
nine schools, colleges, and universities
are represented among the 208 mem-
bers of the teaching faculty of the
University of Washington. Practically
all the large American schools, as
well as several foreign. institutions,
have graduates on the faculty. Among
the foreign schools on the list are:
Heidelberg, Leipsig, Munich, and
Strassburg, Germany; McMasters,
Acadia, McGill, and Toronto, Canada;
OxforJ. England; St. Annen, Russia;
Grenoble, France, and Santiago, Chile.
Flann1l Shirts made to order. G. H.
Wild Company. Leading merchant
tailors. State street. etf

Washington, Nov. 30.-Officials to-
day' believed the allied governments
will take the hints of their ambassa-
dors here and permit Count Tarno-
wski, the new Austrian ambassador,
to come to Washington without "un-
usual interference." It was believed
Great Britain and France at least
would grant the suggestion made by
this government in representations
sent late yesterday to "consider" the
case. These representations, it was
stated, do not constitute a flat re-
quest for safe conduct for the new
envoy, but contains a reminder that
failure to justify Tarnowski's right of
passage would make a distinctly bad
impression upon public opinion here.
The communications are based
strictly upon international law and in
no way make the issue one of in-
ternational courtesy which would
place this country in the attitude of
asking a favor. It is frankly admitted
that final denial of the request would
create a condition difficult to solve.
Even should safe conduct be granted
the Austrian envoy, however, it would
not protect his papers. These would
be subject to search by the British
government. A speedy reply is ex-
pected from both England and France
to the representations., The embas-
sies here have already intimated to
their governments that Tarnowski
should be allowed to come. He is
scheduled to sail Dec. 16 from Rotter-
dam.
To Marry Girl Whose Praises He Sung
New Yorl, 30.--"A dazzling chorus
of bright-eyed beauties," "a whirl of
gleeful curves," and other expressiena
denoting the last word in feminine
charms were things Leon Friedman
wrote for ten years as a mere matter
of daily routine. He was press agent
for the Ziegfield 'Follies.
But now it's all different. It isn't
casual any more. It's from the heart.
For among the chorus girls was Grace
Jones, slender, blonde, and all the
regular stuff. Friedman fell. They
were married yesterday.
FOUR DAYS UNTIL
MiCHIGANENSIAN SUBSCRIPTION
CAMPAIGN. SAVE 50 CENTS

SWEDISH OPINION
DIIDEDON WAR
Scandinavian Peoples Are Neither
Pr.-Gorman Nor Pro-Ally
in Thought
UNITE IN RATING STURDY SLAT
By Wm. Philip Simms
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Stockholm, Nov. 6.-(By Mail.)-
Sweden is perhaps the most divided
country in the universe over the war.
One could not say with truth that
Sweden is pro-ally or pro-German.
There are many factions and eah
looks at the great conflagration in
its own way.
Almost everybody is anti-Russian. A
great many are anti-British, a small
circle are pro-German, but everybody
is pro-French, even the pro-Germans.
A strange paradox, but a true one.
Still Sweden as a nation is neither
pro-ally ner pro-Prussia.
The Russian antipathy is historic.
Sweden used to be on both sides of
the Baltic. Russia took Finland and
for generations Sweden has feared
Russia some day would try to go
further west, blazing a way to open
ports of the Atlantic. German propa-
ganda has helped this feeling along.
Frrace, one and all say, has been
the ideal country in this war, from the
first gun till the last. She has fought
like a lion and unselfishly. She has
put herself, heart and soul, into the
struggle and has always fought strict-
ly according to Hoyle. Her attitude
has been nobility itself, and not even
the pro-Germans seem to hope for her
defeat.
Kowever, in this pro-German crowd,
one hears that England is using
France for her own selfish purposes.
According to them, England is aiming
at world-domination and that if the
allies win and Germany is crushed,
England will have her hand on the
world's windpipe and can throttle it
at leisure, commercially and other-
wise.
And as proof of what England will
do they point to the English block-
ade. Even now, they claim, Sweden
is being sorely pinched economically
by the actio of Ungland's fleet. The
cost of living has gone up from 40 to
100 per cent, they assert, and certain
commodities are not to be had at all.
should angland become all-powerful,
as she would in the event of a crushed
Germany, what then would happen to
Sweden?
I asked President Carl Frisk of the
Stockholm Handels bank, one of the
most powerful financiers in all Scan-
dinavia and one of the best informed
men in such matters in Sweden, about1
the effect of the British blockade and
if it had affected the cost of living to
any great extent. He did not seem
to think it had. Living was higher,
he said, but on an average not more
than 25 or 30 per cent. Sweden is ex-
ceedingly prosperous and there is
plenty of money in the land.
Perhaps the greatest authority on
the cost of living in Sweden Is Axel
Robert Bildt, director of Transito,
Ltd., formed to handle freight "fn
transit"' from foreign countries,
through Sweden, to Russia. This con-
cern was recognized by the British
government and goods consigned to it
were allowed free passage through
the blockade because England had
guaranteed that such goods would not
be diverted to Germany, once in
Sweden, as formerly had been the
case very often. The pro-German press
of Sweden fought Transito merci-

lessly, claiming that through it Eng-
land was trying to get a strangle hold
on the economic life of Sweden, con-
troling every mouth full of food and
all other supplies coming into the
eountry.
"This assertion was utterly without
foundation," Director Hildt told me.
"We handle only 'in transit' goods.
These, now arriving in large quantities
from America and other countries, are
let through the blockade without de-
lay. It is not true that England thus
controls all Sweden's imports. We'
simply are surety to England that
such goods are not consigned to us,
but go to their proper destination in-
st'ead of to the central powers."
"gas the cost of living gone up very
much since the war?" he was asked.
"Not more than in the United States,

"The Girl From Brazil"
ARCADE
Shows at 3:oo; 6:30; 8:oo; 9:30
oc Unless Otherwise Specified.
Phone 296-M.
Thur.-3o-June Caprice and Jane Lee in
"The Ragged Princess." Chap. 5 of
Billie Burke in Gloria's Romance." x5c
Fri: Dec.-i-Fracis Bushman & Beverly
Bayne in "the Diplomatic Service"
and Drew Comedy. tsc
Sat -.-Nell Shipman & Wm,. Duncan in
"Trhrough the Wall." !Chldren's Mat.
2P. .earyvl Pickford in "A Good
Orpheum Theatre
Mtinees, 2:00-3:30; Evening, 6:45,
8:5, 9:30.
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Friday. - Dec - x- Theodore Roberts in
"Anton the Terrible." Also Bray
Cartoons. .
Sat.-2-2L0i se Glautn in "The Wolf Wo
man." Also Triangle Comedy, Mack
Swain in "Ambrose's Rapid Rise."
4vening, i5c.
Sun-Mon.-3-4-Marie Doro in"The Lash,"
Also Holmes Travels.
PHONE
1321 or 170-M
FOR FLOWERS
A full line of plant and
cut flower baskets
Goodhew Floral Co,
225 E. Liberty Darling Bldg.
*
* AIR IS FOOD, SAYS MAN *
* WHO REFUSES TO EAT..*
* Minneapolis, Nov. 30.-The *
* high cost of living doesn't an- *
* noy Carl Peterson. In the coun- *
* ty jail Peterson refused to eat *
, any of the food supplied him *
* and announced that he had not *
* tasted food for three months. *
* Peterson was arrested at *
* Bloomington, where his pecu- *
* liar actions alarmed farmers *
* living in the vicinity. Peterson, *
* they said, was insisting on *
* preaching the value of pure air *
* as food to whomever he could *
* induce to listen.
* A deputy offered him food and *
* was refused. *
* x
x x* x * * x*x*x* * * x *x
Argentine and other neutral countries.
I should-say," he replied. "At the
start we had in Sweden abundant sup-
plies of everything but Swedish deal-
ers could not withstand the tempta-
tion to sell and disposed of this sur-
plus, principally to Germany at war
prices. Now we are short and prices
have risen in consequence some 30
per cent on an average.
"England has tried to arrange with
Sweden to allow Sweden to restock
on an ante-bellum basis. But the pro-
German element refuse to agree to
this.
"So relations between the two coun-
tries continued to be somewhat
strained. England refused to allow
certain things to pass the blockade
and- enter Sweden. Sweden retaliated
by laying an embargo on certain ar-
ticles-wood pulp, for example. Now
the wood pulp dealers, who formerly
exported some 300,000 to 500,000 tons
per year, have no market for their
pulp and are not happy.
"I am sure," Director Bildt said,
"that at present our government would
like to go back on its action."

Missionaries to Sail for Egypt Soon
New York, Nov. 30.-Feeling that
the strategic moment for a drive of
Chistianity into Egypt has come, Mrs.
Wendell Cleland, with her husband,
will sail for the land of the Nile in
December to engage in missionary
work. She is the daughter of New
York State Comptroller Eugene M.
Travis. Mr. Cleland is to become pro-
fessor of English in Cairo University,
established under an interdenomina-
tional board of trustees.
FOUR DAYS UNTIL
MICHIGANENSIAiS SUBSCRIPTION
CAMPAIGN. SAVE 50 CENTS

Mat. Wed.
Thu. Sat.

GARRICK
DETROIT

IVAEZPREPARES FOR
ATTCKBYVILLISA
Chihuahua City Survivors May Aid
in Defense Against
Bandits
El Paso, Nov. 30.-Active prepara-
tions for the defense of Juarez against
an expected attack by Villa bandits
were under way today. In a ring en-
circling the town, rifle pits have been
dug for outposts. Load after load of
household goods belonging to families
in the Mexican town continue today to
be brought across the international
bridge. In civilian quarters in Juarez
it was declared today that in case of
an attack by Villistas there would be
no resistance.
United States military authorities
were doubtful whether Villa would at-
tempt an attack so near the American
frontier, but Mexicans seemed con-
vinced that the border town will be
the next one assaulted. The Juarez
garrison is said to number about 800.
Juarez, Nov. 30.-Seven hundred
Carranza troops, survivors of the bat-
tle at Chihuahua City, with 26 pieces
of artillery, arrived here shortly be-
fore noon today. The troops were a
part of Ozuna's cavalry who escaped
on four trains last Monday after the
order to evacuate had been given.
General Trevino's command started
its retreat to the northeast, the sur-
viving Carranzistas said. The fate of
Americans and other foreigners in
Chihuahua City is unknown.
WOULD STOP USAGE OF SLANG
AMONG ENGLISH SOLDIERS
London, Nov. 30.-London's long-
faced element tossed up its hands to-
day with the discovery that Tommy
is a violent "cusser."
"Foul and blasphemous words are,
as it were, common in camp speech,"
said a prominent. church-goer who
hopes to wash Tommy's vocabulary.
"To hear such conversation first
shocks young and sensitive minds and
ears, but gradually these horrible ex-
pressions slip into the average sol-
dier's vocabulary."
A large number of soldiers have en-
listed from Billingsgate market and
Covent Garden, the two centers of su-
perviolent cussing in London.
The reformers suggest gentler
language from the officers as one
means of uplifting Tommy's speech.
AUSTRIAN EMPEROR TO BE
BURIED IN VIENNA CHAPEL
London, Nov. 30.-Crypt No. 133, in
the vault of the age-darkened chapel
of the Capuchin fathers, in Vienna,
will tonight hold the mortal remains
of the late emperor of Austria-Hun-
gary.
Dispatches from Vienna today said
preparations for the funeral were be-
ing completed with all the regal show
and pomp of medieval custom that
the rigid etiquette of the most formal
court of the world demands.
Franz Josef will take his place
among the Hapsburg dead late today.
The funeral procession which will bear
his body to the grave where he joins
his ancestors will start at 4:30 oclock
from the Hofburg palace.
E. S. Jacous' Five-Piece Orchestra
for dances, entertainments and con
certs. 520 N. Fifth Ave. Phone 1487.
For live, progressive, up-to-date ad-
vertising use The Michigan Daily.

Week of
Nov. 27

That the enrollment of students in
the University from other states than
Michigan has remained practically the
,ame depite the increase in tuition
fees for students not residents of the
state, is shown by the registration fig-
ures for this year. Many states have
shown a remarkable increase in the
number of students, while others have
shown a considerable falling off in at-
tendance figures. The most notice-
able among the latter are New York,
Iowa, Kentucky, Nebraska, and Illi-
nois. The states showing the great-
est gains in attendance are Ohio, Mis-
souri, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Colo-
rado, Ohio leading in this respect with
an increase of 59 over the number of
students enrolled last year. Kansas,
with an enrollment of 43, seems to
make good her boast, which\ we hear
so often from temperance platforms,
that she leads all states in the per-
centage of college attendance. The
following is the enrollment figures for
this year by states:
Ohio, 438; New York, 282; Illinois,
198; Pennsylvania, 193; Indiana, 172;
Missouri, 48; Kansas, 43; Iowa, 40;
New Jersey, 37; Massachusetts, 33;
Minnesota, 31; District of Columbia,
27; Oklahoma, 26; Washington, 25;
Wisconsin, 24; Kentucky, 22; South
Dakota, 21; California, 21; Colorado,
19; West Virginia, 17; Connecticut,
17; Idaho, 15; Texas, 13; Arkansas,
12; Wyoming, 11; Tennessee, 10; Ari-
zona, 10; Montana, 10; Nebraska, 9;
Maryland, 8; Virginia, 7; Georgia, 7;
Vermont, 6; Utah, 5; Oregon 5; North
Dakota, 5; New Mexico, 4; Alabama, 4;
Florida, 4; Louisiana, 4; Nevada, 4;
Rhode Island. 4; Mississippi, 3; New
Hampshire, 3; Maine, 2; South Caro-
lina, 2; North Carolina, 1.
The southern and western states
show a greater percentage of attend-
ance in the law and literary colleges,
while the eastern states show an an-
nual number in the engineering col-
lege.
You have not shoppcd
Unless you have stopped
At the James Foster House or Art. tf
FOUR DAYS UNTIL
)ICIIGN EN--S SIA SECRPI
CA1MPAI(GN. S TVE 50 CENTS
For live, progressive, up-to-date ad-
vertising use The Michigan Daily.

Sheehan o

I

C. W. GRAhAM, ngr.

Some shoes, slightly soiled
at reduced prices.

pp.?

NOW PLAYINC
"The Girl
Worth Wile"
With ARTH UR C' NRAQ
and PRIMROSE SEKOM
See Sunday's Photo Play
"The Prince
of Graus tark "
0OHIO x,11)DS IN OUT-OF-STATE
ENROLLMENT WITH 438 TOTAL
Registration of Non-resident Students
N ot Affected by Raise in
Tuition

SHR TS
PANTS
SHOES

r

4

LIBER.TY AT 606

Cu

D. E. GRENNAN
Real
storn Tailoring
-ETRidig
rsLIBERTY AT 606 Breech.;

G

e

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