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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 29, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

* - i

THANKSGIVING I

LY fN DO N

719 N. University

A Season of Good Things

THE ONE POORPE
Who delivers the Goods and has
been delivering them for 12 years
right here among Michigan Students

The
E noyclopaed Ia
Britanniloa

At
in

this time of the year, with good things
abundance, how about Your Clothes?
Why don't you get ready for the Holidays?

Kadaks
a Pd
ill xtpples

G -aranteed
S Amatsinr
F'inishti m

(Handy Volume Issue)

An all-wool suit or overcoat, individually cut and hand-
tailored to your individual measure, will be both sensible
and seasonable, and will give you something good for
the holidays.

Order now while our showing is complete, and have
that Suit or Overcoat in time for Thanksgiving.

SUITS TO ORDER

DRESS SUITS FOR HIRE

J. K. MALCOLM

604 E. Liberty St.

Malcolm Block

Phone 1713-M

I

N E1 I0 R S
Sit Early For Your "MICHIGANENSIAN"
PICTURE AT
619 E. Liberty St.
Ann Arbor,.- - Mich.
Perfect Portraitures
Unsurpassed Accomodations for
Group Photographs.
LAmateur Work Handled in a Pro-
fessional Way.
MAIN STUDIOS 1546-48 Broadway New York, N. Y.

NY STUDENTS TAE
AVANTAE OF LOANS

ALLIES DEFEND STAND
IN AMBASSADOR CASE

versity Fund in Use Amounts
$7,500.00; Usual Beneficiaries
Are Seniors

to I British

Foreign Office Sends
This Country About
von Tarnow

Note to

FACT NOT TRUE
American Enlisted in Foreign Army
Dees Not Lose Status
as Citizen
SOME COUNTRIES DEMAND OATH
"An American who enlists for serv-
ice in a foreign army does not neces-
sarily lose his status as a citizen of
the United States." This statement
was made yesterday by Prof. Jesse S.
Reeves, head of the political science
department, when asked to correct the
popular belief that the Americans who
have enrolled in the foreign legion and
similar branches of foreign military
service thereby lose all claim to any
rights and duties as citizens of this
ccuntry.
"It is true that a man may expattriate
himself when going to fight for a for-
eign power," continued Profesor
Reeves, "but that is not due, directly,
to his soldier's occupation. If it oc-
'urs at all, it is because, when he
takes his oath as a soldier he re-
nounces allegiance to any other coun-
try than the one in whose interest he
is to fight.
"The loss of birthright is accom-
plished by the man's own act. It is
in no wise due to action on the part of
the United States. The president has
no power, himself, to make or unmake
citizens, except where authorized to
do so by act of congress, and no statute
exists whereby expatriation is caused
by fighting abroad.
"Some foreign countries do demand
an oath from their soldiers renounc-
ing all other allegiance, but it is not
an universal rule, and there are many
possible opportunities for an Ameri-
can to fight in the ranks of foreign
belligerents without losing any of his
material rights of citizenship, and
without surrendering any opportuni-
ties for political achievement on his
return.
"Notwithstanding this retention *of
fundamental American interest, it has
been the policy of the state depart-
ment since almost the inception of the
government to withdraw protection
from Americans fighting in alien ranks
ly refusing to give them passports.
This, while it occasions temporary dif-
ficulties to the scrappy Yankee, is far
from being an absolute rejection of
him as an American, and should he
ever return to his own country, he can
take up his native duties and privileges
as though he had never left its shores."
HOMEOPATHIC FACULTY GIVES
STUDENT BANQUET AT UNION

"The Girl From Brazil"
ARCADE
Shows at 3:oo; 6:30; 8:00; 9:30
roc Unless Otherwise Specified.
Phone a96-M.
Mon.-27-Theda Bara in "The Eternal
So" r$tc.
Tues.-28-L n Walker in "The Kid";
Mutt & Jeff Cartoon.
X1e.29Lew ;Fields in "The ManiWho
Stood Still"; Mutt & Jeff Cartoon.
Thur.-;o-June Caprice and Jane Lee in
"The Ragged Princess." Chap. 5 of
Billie Burke in Gloria's Romance." 15c

Mat. Wed.
Thu. V Sat.

C. W. GRAHAM, ngr,

Orpheum Theatre
Matinees, 2:00-3:30; Evening, 6:45,
8:x5, 9:30.
Saturdays-Holidays continluous.
Wed.-2q-Mary Pickford in Hulda from
Holland." Rebooked.
Thurs.-Fri. - 30-x - Theodore Roberts in
"Anton the Terrible." Also Bray
Cartoons.
Sat.-2-Louise Glaum in "The Wolf Wo-
man." Also Triangle Couedy, Mack
Swain in "Ambrose's Rapid Rise."
Evening, isc.

1 r

I

AJE I
NOW PLAYING
Schwarz & Co.
The Best Novelty Yet
Darrell & Hanford

I

U

Come in and Browse around

GAR RICK
DETROIT

I

Information from the treasurer's
office discloses the fact that more stu-
dents than ever before are taking ad-
vantage of the various loan and trust
funds at the University's disposal. At
the present time 80 students are en-
joying the use of between $7,500 and
$8,000, loaned to them.
The. money from these funds is dis-
tributed with great care. The usual
beneficiaries are seniors of proved
merit, who are in need of financial aid
to enable them to complete their un-
iversity work.
These loan funds contained a total
of about $40,000 at the end of last
June, having received about $16,000
in new donations during the previous
year. Among the new funds started
were: The Dodge Loan Fund, $10,000;
the Avery Memorial Fund, $5,000; the
Beach Scholarship Fund, $1,200; the
Class of 1915 Lit Scholarship of $550;
the Michigan Chapter Daughters of the
American Revolution Scholarship,
WHAT'S GOING ON
Today.
4 o'clock-Rehearsal of the Japanese
act of "The Magic Carpet," Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall. I
7 o'clock-All-Fresh Glee club re-
hearsal, MacMillan hall.
7 o'clock--Naval reserve drill, en-
gineering arch.
7:30 o'clock-Maurice Sugar, '14L,
speaks to Intercollegiate Socialist so-
ciety, Newberry hall.
Tomorrow.
2 to 5 o'clock--Michigan Union dance
at the Union.
U-Notices.
Junior engineering class dues will
advance from $1.00 to $1.50 if not
paid before Dec. 1. They can be paid
Wednesday from 1 to 2 o'clock in the
Engineering society rooms.
There will be a rehearsal for the.
Chinese act of "The Magic Carpet" at
4 o'clock Friday afternoon in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall.
Soph engineers and fresh lits will
play off their tie game at 2 o'clock1
Saturday afternoon. -
Fresh lit football practice, 4 o'clock
Friday.
Navy to Build Speedy Scout Cruiser
Washington, Nov. 28.-The Seattlel
Construction and Dry Dock company
today was awarded a contract by thec
navy department for the construction
of one thirty-five knot scout cruiser
for $4,975,000. Delivery will be made
within 30 months.

Week of
Nov. 27

NOW ON DISPLAY HERE

r

Sheehan Co.

Washington, Nov. 28.-Another con-
troversy between the American gov-
ernment and the entente allies is in
prospect as a result of the refusal of
the British government to grant safe
conduct to Count Adam Tarnowski von
Tarnow, the newly appointed Austro-
Hungarian ambassador to the United
States.
There is an absence of any precedent
exactly fitting this case that requires
the state department to be careful in
assuming ground, and the text of the
note handed Ambassador Page will be
awaited before a decision as to the
course to be followed is reached.
Great Britain's attitude. if adhered
to, would prevent a new Turkish am-
bassador and successors to Captains
Boy-Ed and von Papen, former naval
and military attaches of the German
embassy, from reaching the United
States.
The foreign office of London has sent
Ambassador Page a note definitely re-
fusing to grant a safe conduct to Count
Adam Tarnowski von Tarnow, the new
Austro-Hungarian ambassador to the
United States. The reason for the re-
fusal may be paraphrased as follows:
"Even if international law forbade.
the refusal of such a safe conduct, the
actions of Austrian and German am-
bassies and consulates abroad have
been so much in excess of regular dip-
lomatic functions that the British gov-
ernment feels justified in withholding
its consent for such diplomats to travel
to their posts."
STAUB APPROVES RELIEF WORK
University Women Make Bags to Helpc
Carry on Campaign

PHONE
1321 or 170-M
FOR FLOWERS
A full line of plant and
cut flower basicets
Goodhew Floral Co.
225 E. Liberty Darling Bldg.

Knapp & Cornalla
ttONETTA"
Special Attraction
Imperial Troupe
Football on Bicycles

17 Perfect Degrees
from 6B Softest
to9H Hardest
and hardandme -
ium copying
L IKE a soft-leaded easy mark-
ing pencil? Take tho highr
numbered B's such as 313, ,
5B. For the extreme limit of
softness 613 is without an clual
and is used by"any as being the
ideal of all penxcils.
Medium degree is HB. H's
are the harder grades, 211 or 311
being medium hard, and 611,
etc., being used for thin, clear,
fine lines of detailings. Your
professors will confirm these
statements as to the merits of
VEN S pencils. Note the dis-
tihicive VENUS -Hater maicrk fin-
ish? wieii you buy.

NORSE STEAMER IN DISTRESS
Boat, Valued at $1,000,000, Carries
War Supplies
San Francisco, Nov. 28-.The Nor-
wegian steamer Niels Neilsen was re-
ported in distress 250 miles west of
Seattle, in advices received today by
the United States naval radio station
here. Wireless advices were that the
vessel had lost itsvpropeller and was
attempting to return to an American
port. The United States steamer South
Dakota and other vessels in the Pa-
cific were sent to the location given
by the Neilsen and several coast guard
cutters have gone to its assistance.
The messages received here Indi-
cated thqpvessel was practically help-
less.
The Nielsen was of 8,800 tons, owned
by B. Stolt-Nielsen of Norway, and was
carrying a general cargo, including
war supplies, to Vladivostok. Its crew
was entirely Norwegian. The vessel
is valued at $1,000,000 and the cargo
is even more valuable. It sailed from
Seattle Nov. 20.

EXTRA Iiportant plays
in motion pica-
ures of the
Cornell - Michigan
GAME
SENIOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
VISIT TOLEDO PLANTS FRIDAY
The senior chemical engineers will
leave Ann Arbor Friday morning, Dec.
1, on the 7:10 o'clock train for To-
ledo, via the Ann Arbor railroad. On
Friday the following manufacturing
plants will be visited: The Libby Glass
company, manufacturers of electric
light bulbs and cut glass ware; the
Toledo Window Glass company; the
Owens Bottle Machine company, where
glass bottles are made entirely by ma-
chinery.
On Saturday the party of engineers
will visit the plants of the Toledo Fur-
nace company, the Ford Plate Glass
company, and the Toledo Sugar com-
pany. The visiting party will make
its headquarters at the Boody house.

r' CG
' ' ~;q
! , ,{ . r9
-i '
s'

is beautifully smooth and even inf tex
ture. it rubs out pen cil marks perfectly-
Gray 3and d(oes not cause cdiscoloraztion-
x2 sizes from too to at.ox-to 4 to a box.
Box price $2.00. Venus Erasers arc the
best erasers. Ask for them by name.
For sale by your supply store Correspondence solicited
AMERICAN LEAD PENCIL CO.
215 Fifth Ave., Dept. D.D.
New York
Moleskin coats-Wombat fur collar
-cut long--belted back-Wagner &
Co., State Street. 26-28-29
E. S. Jacobus' Five-Piece Orchestra
for dances, entertainments and con-
certs. 520 N. Fifth Ave. Phone 1487.
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. 18-tf
Dinner at the Whitney Hotel from
12:00 to 2:00 at $1.00. 28-29

The faculty of the homeopathic med-
ical school tendered the annual
banquet to the students of the de-
partment at 6 o'clock last night at the
Michigan Union. The banquet was fol-
lowed by a formal party of the home-
opathic hospital guild at Packard acad-
emy.
Dr. D. W. Myers acted as toastmas-
ter. Prof. Evans Holbrook and Ansel
B. Smith, '09, entertained the guests
with talks. Several students of the
medical school gave short and im-
promptu remarks.
SEVERAL TICKETS REMAIN FOR
UNION THANKSGIVING DANCE

You have not shopped
Unless you have stopped
At the James Foster House of Art.

Mr. Albert W. Staub, manager of
the war relief information and ship-
ping office, expressed his approval of
the relief work undertaken by Michi-
gan girls in a letter to Mrs. Burr of
this city in which he says: "I was very
glad to receive your letter of Nov. 17,
because I have always wondered why
the girls of our American colleges
have not undertaken some definite
form of European war relief work."
The first meeting held yesterday
afternoon proved very successful, 40
comfort bags ready to be filled being
the result of the afternoon's work.
Fifteen women were present and it is
expected that many more will be-
come interested. The next meeting
vill be on Tuesday, Dec. 5.
Use The Michigan Daily Want Ads
for results.

A few tickets may still be obtained
for the special Thanksgiving matinee
dance to be held at the Michigan Union
from 2 to 5 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon. Ike Fisher's orchestra will fur-
nish music for the occasion.
Those chosen to serve on the com-
mittee are: Willis D. Nance, '17, chair-
man; A. Loomis Kirkpatrick, '18, G.
Edward Dake, '18E, and Ramon V.
Dixon, '20.
PHA101ACy RE PARTMENT GET
REQUESTS TO FILL POSITIONS
"There is a great demand for phar-
maceutical chemists," stated Dean J.
0. Schlotterbeck of the pharmacy de-
partment today. Dean Schlotterbeck
stated further that the requests to fill
positions were coming in practically
every day and that these requests for
the most part, came from the eastern
half of the United States.
SIX DAYS UNTIL
lIICIIIGANENSIAN SUBSCRIPTION
CAMPAIGN. SAVE 50 CENTS f

IN YE OLDEN DAYS ALL WAS
DIFFERENT, SAYS CARETAKER
(Continued from Page Four.)
wear some other kind of hat for the
silk hat was the senior hat.
Upon his coming to class next day,
he removed his hat, laid it down upon
his desk, and calmly drew a hand-
some pistol from his hip pocket which
he placed upon the brim. After classes
a huge crowd gathered in front of the
law building, but made no attempt to
molest him, until he had gone some
way, when the number became so
great that it was impossible for him
to make any further headway.
While he quietly eyed the menacing
mass, he kept his hand in his coat
pocket, and all around him kept'-at a
respectable distance. A couple of pro-
fessors asked him whether he wouldn't
use some other headgear, for, they
said, he might probably have to leave
school if he didn't. The youth chose
the path of honor, as he saw it, and
within a few hours left the town for
the southland, never to return again.
Perhaps his grandson Is now wear-
ing a fresh cap.
ENGINEERING SOCIETY
FISHER SAXAPHONE PARTY.
MICHIGAN UNION, FRIDAY NIGHT,
DECEMBER FIRST. TICKETS 75
CENTS, AT THE UNION
Ann Arbor's progressive merchants
use the Michigan Daily as their adver-
tising medium.

tf

Maybe You Can't Go Home
For Thanksgiving
But you can get as good a TURKEY DINNER, with
all the fixings, right here in Ann Arbor as
you would at home and it costs
you but 40c

SIX DAYS UNTIL
ICHIGANENSIAN SUBSCRIPTION
CAMPAIGN. SAVE 50 CENTS

Here is the menu

Boston Oyster Soup

Lake Superior White Fish, Maradia Hotel
Roast Young Turkey, Cranberry Sauce

Salmon Salad

IBER.TY AT 6061

Olives

Potatoes au Gratin
New Peas
Home-Made Pies

Celery

Golf
Knicker

D E. GRENNAN
Riding
rs LIBERTY AT 606 Breeches

40C

The Grill Room

Under Huston's

Phone 1748-R

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