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November 28, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-28

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THE WEATHER
FOR ANN ARBOR-
TUESDAY-CLOUDY, WITH PROB-
ABLY SNOW

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Fy.
l(jAN

-UNITED PRESS WIRF
DAY AND NWGHT SERVICE
TilE ONLY flOINING TAPERE
ANN ARBOR

VOL. XXVIL No. 49. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1916. PRICE FIVE C

HOLD SPOTLIGHT
VAU DEViLLE AT 8
O'CLOCK TONIGHT

HILL AUDITORIUM SCENE
MICHIGAN UNION'S PRO-
DUCTION

OFI

NEARLY 200 MEN FORM CAST
"Camp Davis", Silhouette Act, Stunts
by ]Fmmerman, and Minstrels
Compose Program
Mirth and song hold sway in Hill
auditorium tonight at 8 o'clock, when
a cast of nearly 200 men will aid in
the production of the Michigan Union's
spotlight vaudeville. The hugh stage
is set with a woodland scene, the 2,500
yards of painted canvass employed, to-
gether with various other scenic and
lighting effects, making for one of the
most novel and pleasing. entertain-
ments ever produced by the organiza-
tion.
The first dress rehearsal was held
last night, and moved with a smooth-
ness and precision which promises a
finished performance this evening.
Tickets, which are free to all Union
members, life members, or pledged
life members, have been in great de-
mand, and the few remaining may
still be secured at the Union desk to-
day.
One hundred engineers will take
part in the act, "Camp Davis." All
mnembers of the cast were present at
the camp during the past summer and
will once more gather about the camp-
fire to sing and make merry. They
will be led by Don. Smith, '17E.
Louis B. Emmerman, '18L, who made
so pronounced a hit at the recent band
bounce, will put on several novel
stunts, in one of which he makes use
of a diminutive pickaninny.
An act is silhouette is said to be
a clever take off on several popular
actors famous in the comic movies.
The laugh-provoking Chaplin is play-
ed by L. J. Saunders, '19, supported.
by F. M. Adams, '17, and L. W. van
Aiken, '17M. This is followed by an
Impersonation of arry Louder by Mor-
rison C. Wood, '17.
Forty-five minutes of minstrels close
the program. Twenty-one men have
been picked to get off the jokes which
have been written by E. E. Pardee, '17,
and Roy H. Fricken, '19. Songs and
stories, together with a spectacular
visitation from the underworld makes
the blackface act easily the best on
the evening's program.
Although women will be admitted to
all parts of the auditorium if escorted,
Aken, '17M. This is -followed by an
impersonation of Larry Lauder by
Morrison C. Wood, '17.
Michigan Club Asks for Opinions
With a view to securing an expres-
Wion of Detroit alumni on the ques-
tion "What Is the Matter With Michi-
gan Athletics?" the board of governors
of the Michigan club of Detroit has
distributed cards asking for opinions
from Michigan graduates in that city.
The letters are to be sent to J. M.
-O'Dea, secretary, 1700 David Whitney
building. None of the letters will be
quoted without permission of the writ-
ers.
Women's Committee Spends $134,965
Albany, Nov. 27.-The national
Hughes, women's committee which pro-
moted the Women's Special which cam-
paigned for Hughes, received $134, 65
and spent practically the same amount
said an election expense account filed
here today.
Tickets for Engineers' Dance on Sale
Tickets far the engineering dance to
be given at the Union Friday evening
can be obtained for 75 cents at the
Union desk after 12 o'clock today.

FAVORS MASS MEETING
FOR WARPRISONUCMPS
University Senate Approves Holding
Gathering to Arouse Interest
in Y. M. C. A. Work
At its first meeting of the year last
night, the University Senate went on
record as favoring the holding of a
mass meeting in Hill auditorium to
explain to the students of the Univer-
sity the practical working of the Y. M.
C. A. war prison camps in Europe and
the work the Y. M. C. A. is doing
there.
The mass meeting will be r id with
a view toward interesting students
sentiment in this work and getting
student opinion as to whether or not
a campaign should be held on the cam-
pus to raise funds for the support of
"Y" secretaries who will go to Europe
and organize health services, educa-
tional and recreational facilities and
perform other beneficial work in those
camps.
The definite date of the meeting
has not yet been set, but will probably
be held in about two weeks' time. An
attempt will be made to get Dr. John
R. Mott, international Y. M. C. A. sec-
retary, as the speaker, or Mr. C. W.
Whitehair, general secretary of the
Cornell University "Y." Dr. Hall is
prominent in international affairs, and
is at present serving on the committee
appointed by President Wilson to set-
tle the Mexican question. He was also
once offered the United States minis-
try to China. Mr. Whitehair has had
personal experiences in, these camps.
He spent to summers at the war front
and has helped to organize European
"Y" war prison camps.
If Michigan holds this campaign, it
will be following in the footsteps of
other prominent colleges and univer-
sities in the country that have raised
money for this cause. Harvard, Min-
nesota, and Williams have been prom-
inent in this work, as have man.y
of the smaller colleges. Hillsdale, a
college with an attendance of but 500
students, raised $1,000 alone.
The idea of having this meeting was
first presented to President Harry B.
Huthchins by representatives of the
following student organizations: The
Michigan Union, Y. M. C. A., Y. W. C.
A., the Daily, Women's league, and the
student Council. The work of organ-
izing the mass meeting will be in the
hands of a. committee of six, represent-
ing these organizations. This commit-
tee will start work immediately, and
is composed of the following men and
women: M. W. Welch, '17, J. C. B.
Parker, '17, Grant L. Cook, '17L, Glenn
M. Coulter, '18L, Margaret Reynolds,
'17, and Josephine Randall, '17.
All the warring countries in Europe
will benefit by funds which may be
raised as a result of this mass meet-
ing. The money will be divided equal-
ly betweenthe central powers and the
allies. As the mass meeting is only
to get an opinion of the student body
on this subject, no funds will be col-
lected, but contributions will be made
later if it is decided to raise a collec-
tion.
HOOF AND MOUTH DISEASE NOW
THREATS CHICAGO STOCK YARD
Chicago, Nov. 27.-A quarantine or-
der barring all live stock from Mis-
souri, Nebraska and Kansas markets
from Chicago was issued here today by
President A. G. Leonard of the Union
Stock Yards and Transit company.
The order is a precautionary ,one is-
sued when a case of hoof and mouth

disease in the Kansas City stock yards
was reported.
Dr. S. E. Bennett, veterinary expert,
is on his way to Kansas City today to
.ake tests and determine the exact
nature of the disease reported. One-
third of the live stock business of the
Chicago yards is cut off by the order.
A year ago an outbreak of the foot'
and mouth disease cost middle west
farmers and stock growers millions.

Amundsen to Fly to North Pole
New York, Nov. 27.-Captain Amundsen, discoverer of the South
Pole, plans to fly to the North Pole in an aeroplane, he announced
today on his arrival here on the steamship Frederick VIII.
His plan is to start north in 1918 in a ship now being built and
fitted in Norway, drift as near to the top of the world as the ice
will permit, then fly the rest of the way in an aeroplane which he
will buy here.
"It will be possible to make flights of 200 kilometers in an hour,
while with sledges it might require two weeks or near that amount
of time," he said.

$85,00,000 WORTH OF
FODIN COLD STORAGE
Chicago Health Commissioner Makes
Estimate After Examination
of Conditions in City.
Chicago, Nov. 27.-Probably $85,000,-
000 worth of foodstuffs are held in
cold storage in Chicago, according to
estimates made today following the
raids of Health Commissioner Robert-
son an a staff of 50 investigators
here.
After discovering spoiled eggs in the
storage in the two big refrigerating
houses here, Dr. Robertson today
turned his investigators into meat and
poultry conditions. His efforts will be
confined to enforcing the ordinance
limiting the time foods can be held in
storage to 10 months, and to confiscat-
ing spoiled or deleterious materials.
Following predictions that eggs may
reach 60 cents a dozen soon, Dr. Rob-
ertson held out some hope of relief
by saying that 85 carloads of eggs be-
longing to James E. Wetz, egg king,
would be forced on the market Jan. 1,
by the 10 months' limit. Other stor-
(Continued on Page Six.)
CHOOSE 19 PEACE)ORATIONS
First Eliminations of Men Field Satur-
day, Dec. 2
Nineteen peace orations were chosen
by the oratory department and the first
eliminations for the final picking of
the oratory representative in the an-
nual peace contest will be held Sat-
urday, Dec. 2, in room 302 Mason hall.
There will be three sections speak-
ing, at 10, 4, and 7 o'clock. The men
who will speak at 10 o'clock are:
E. F. Gasar, '18,'M. F. Peters, '17, J.
R. Simpson, '18, D. R. Hertz, '19, and
J. W. Planck, '18.

GER1MAN-BULGARIAN ALLIES KEEP UP
ADVANCE ON, ROUMANICPlIiPiTAL AS
',DEFENDERS CONTINUE TO0 DRAW BAG

ATTORNEYS GET DATA
FOR ADAMcgs UAUCS
Gregory in Personal Charge of Gov-
erneent Side of Eight-Hour
Question
Washington, Nov. 27.-Government
and railroad attorneys marshalled ma-
terial today for what is destined to be
one of the greatest industrial contests
of recent years, the test of the Adam-
son eight-hour railroad law. Attor-
ney General Gregory had personal
charge of the government end, with
two assistants attending to most of
the actual details;
They prepared a mass of arguments
and precedents to uphold the view that
the Missouri, Oklahoma and Gulf test
case is constitutional, instead of the
contrary, as decided by Judge Hook
last week at EKansas City. Tran-
scripts of records in the Missouri,
Oklahoma and Gulf case of the Adam-
son eight-hour law were received late
today at the office of the clerk of the
supreme court.
The papers were sent immediately
to the department of justice for ex-
amination by officials. If the record
is correct it will be docketed in the
court tomorrow morning.
"RICHELIEU" APPEARS TONIGHT

Niumes to Bfe Put
on New Standard
)lorrison C. Wood, '17, Says Members
Must Take Interest in Cam.
pus Dramatics
"From now on the Mimes of the
Michigan Union will assume an im-
portant role in campus theatricals,"
said Morrison C. Wood, '17, president
of the Mimes, last night. "Heretofore,"
he continued, "we have been an organ-
ization in name alone, this year we
shall have practically full control of
the opera, and the other dramatic en-
tertainments staged under the auspic-
es of the Union. The discord which
has been prevalent between the Mimes
and the Comedy club has been eradiet-
ed, and we shall both work together
to put Michigan dramatics upon a
higher plane. In former years, the
members of the Mimes have done
nothing after their election into the
organization.- Under the new pro-
gram, every man who is elected to
Mimes must take an active interest in
campus dramatics, or resign from the
organi'ation. In this way we hope
to better theatricals, and raise the
standard of the Mimes as an honorary
society.
At a luncheon held at the Union
yesterday the elections from last
year's opera were made. From the
cast were chosen: .E. Hawkes, '17,
Joe Palma, '20M, J. C. Kasberger, '18,
and Walter R. Atlas, '18. The chorus
furnishes three men, Robert Bennett,
'18, L. F. Berry, '18E, and Alan Living-
ston, '18E. The two men selevted from
the orchestra are Leonard Aldrich,'17E,
and Arthur Hammond, '17D. Thatcher
Rea, '17E, Arthur Schupp, '17E, E. E.
Pardee, '17, Abe Hart, '17, and John
Neumann, '17E, were elected as . re-
ward for long service on important
opera committees.
[OMEiPATHIC FACULTY WILL
BANQUET STUDENTS TONIGHT,
The annual' banquet given by the,
faculty of the Homeopathic Medical
School to the students of the depart-
ment will be held at 6 o'clock tonight
at the Michigan Union. The affair will
be followed by a formal party of the
Homeopathic Hospital guild at Pack-
ard academy.
Dr. Dean W. Myers will act as toast-
master. Prof. Evans Holbrook and
Ansel B. Smith, '09, will be the prin-
cipal speakers of the evening. Sev-
eral students of the department will be
called upon to give several short talks
and extemporaneous speeches.
MAJ. GEN. LESSARD MAY BECOME
CANADIAN OVIRSEA ADJ. GEN.

Trs i) P Shakesearean
Present Recital

.I

f~
REPORTS FROM FOUR
SUSTAIN EARLIER
MENTS

QUART]
.STATE-

Classes

STATE 20,000 ITALIANS LOST
Little Activity Reported Along West-
ern Fronts, While Teutons Beat
British on Vardar
London, Nov. 27.-The German-Bul-
garian forces in Roumania are advanc-
ing steadily, consolidating their posi-
tions as they go, while Roumanain
forces are as steadily retreating. State-
ments today from German, Bulgarian,
Russian, and Roumanian capitals
agreed on this general view of the
Balkan campaign.
Berlin reported capture of Alex-
andria and hinted at the driving of a
bolt across the only line of retreat
left for the Roumanian forces that led
up into the southwestern part of Rou-
mania.
loumania Admits Retreat.
The Bucharest statement admitted a
retreat from along the Alt. This was
amplified by the Petrograd state-
ment's explanation that the retiring
forces were taking advantage of all
natural features of that section to re-
sist the enemy. If the German state-
ment is accurate, the Teutonic forces
now control nearly 300 miles of the
lanube, which forms the southwest
border of Roumania.
The Russian official statement agreed
that the Bulgarians had crossed the
river near Simmitza and added that
this enemy force had placed observa-
tion posts along the river Vede, oc-
cupying positions between Valeni and
Rusedewade.
Valeni in German hands.
Valeni is 30 miles southwest of
Alexandria, so that this statement
tend to confirm the German claim of
holding both sides of Alexandria. It
would also confirm the Germain of-
ficial report early today, of a junc-
tion being effected between the two
wings of von Falkenhayn's army. The
greatest interest was expressed here
in a dispatch from Copenhagen an-
nouncing that Czar Nicholas of Rus-
sia had arrived at Kieff enroute to
the Roumanian frontier, where he is
expected to hold conferences with al-
lied commanders.
Italian Lose 20,000 Men, Report
Berlin, Nov. 27.-Loss by Italians of
20,000 men in a coup engineered by
Tripoli natives was announced in a
Constantinople dispatch received here
today. Rawaza Ben Chetwi, who, the
statement says, led the Italians,
turned his arms against Italy.
The statement declares that the
Italians "dare not abandon five cities
which they still occupy on the coast."
The above dispatch apparently
claims Turkish resumption of control
of Tripoli, which country the Otto-
man empire lost in the Turco-Italian
war of 1911, and which Italy formally
annexed Feb. 23, 1912.
l?('rin Exchange Flits Lowest Point
New York, Nov. 27.-Berlin ex-
change fell to the lowest quotation
since the opening of the war today.
The German mark being worth 171-8
cents against the normal value of 24
cents.
British Forces Defeated on Vardar
Berlin, Nov. 27.-British forces
which directed a strong fire towards
German positions south of the Vardar,
and later advanced, were repulsed, to-
day's official statement announced.
Berlin Claims Whole Alt River Line
Berlin, Nov. 27.--"In Roumania the
whole Alt line is in our hands,' read
(Continued on Page Six.)

Prof. T. C. Trueblood's class in
Shakespearean reading will give a
public recital in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall tonight at 8 o'clock. Following
the custom of occasionally using a
play that is not written by Shake-
speare, they will present Lord Lyt-
ton's classic play "Richelieu."
In order that every member of the
class will have an opportunity to ap-
pear in the play, there will be an en-
tirely new cast for every scene. The
class presents two plays each semester]

At 4 o'clock: L. E. Luebbers, '17, and in the past they have proved so
M. M. Frocht, '19, C. F. Wilner, '19, popular that it has been found neces-
H. B. Teegarden, '17, James B. Cashin, sary to turn some people away. No
'19L, James Schermerhorn, Jr., '18, admission is charged, and the request
and Herbert Parzen, '19. is made that the audience arrive on
At 7 o'clock: J. C. Stern, '17, T. A. time. The play will begin promptly
Hart, '19, Lois May, '18, S. Katsuizumi, at 8 o'clock.
'17, Colenel Brown, '19, C. H. Schulte,_
'17, and V. H. Simmons, '18. New York Club Elects Officers
The order of speaking was deter-, Following the annual meeting of the
mined by lot, and from the number University oT Michigan club of New
five will be chosen for the final com- York a short time ago, the board of
petition. governors met and elected officers for
Each oration must be given in less the coming year. The retiring officers
than 16 minutes and must deal with were all re-elected as follows: Presi-
some phase of international peace. The dent, Charles A. Rigelman, '99; vice-
University contest will be held Dec. 14 president, J. Kiddie Goffe, '73; secre-
in University hall. tary-treasurer, Evans A. Stone, '12.
Notice to Advertisers
Because of the holiday on Thursday of this week all
Copy for, Friday's Paper
must be in the Daily office by 2 o'clock
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Ottawa, Ont., Nov. 27.-There is a
persistent rumor in the capital that+
Major General Lessard, Sir Sam+
Hughes' "bete noir" and prior to the
war senior military officer in Canada,
has been appointed adjutant general
of overseas forces. No definite con-
inrmation is obtainable. The militia
department stated that the appoint-
ment rests in the hands of Sir George
Perley. If confirmed, this appointment
would supercede that of General
Leckie made only a few days ago.
What a Blow for Daniel!
Cleveland, Nov. 27.-Cupid stag-
gered today. The result of a rap
handed him by Prof. J. E Cupler who
handles sociology for Western Re-
serve.
"Love alone as a basis for marriage
is vulgar and low," said Cupler to the
Benedicts' club of a church. "Love
is.a potent divorce cause. Other coun-
tries are rapidly abandoning the il-
lusion of love.'

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Come One, Come All

The Years Biggest Show
MICHIGAN UNION

Spotlight adville
AND MINSTREL SHOW

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TONIGHT'S THE NIGHT

HILL AUDITORIUM AT 8

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