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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 26, 1916 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


t

I -1

I

Just received another lot of those

DON'T

FORGET

Me

Suits,

Hats

Caps and

Furnishings

.t a _" 4
'. ^.
.p f
41tl!

at

$3.50

Feather Weight Soft Hats

I

Sheep Lined Coat
And
Patricks Mackinaw
At The

To Get Your

WADHAMS & co
MAIN ST.

Tinker & Company
Clothes, Furnishings and Hats
for
Particular Men.
Cor. S. State and William Sts.

J. F. WUERTH CO.
New Day Light Store next to Orpheum

State St. Store
Nickels Arcade

Kreuser Discusses Modern German
Military Training for Young len

r...
.. .. ..

I

Winter Wear

WE DO

FOR MEN

ODD BOWS and TIES
and collars are hard to find. And when one finds
them, their prices are usually prohibitive. Perhaps
that is why girls h,6pperi in every now and then and
ask to be shown the new neckfixings--they are dis-
tinctive, and their pricef, are "just ordinary."

Otto T. Kreuser, '17, in the last ar-
ticle of a series of five about Germany
tells of the German army.
No institution in Germany is more
misunderstood by the average Amer-
ican than the German army. Not that
we do not hear enough about it, for
we do until we are tired of the sub-
ject. But the basisandrpolicy of the
whole military system remain to us

Main and Liberty

/ _; : A

Your Floral Needs-
Are BEST SA lSFIED By Us
PhONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION

l

02COUIN &
1002 S. UNIVEiRSITY

HALL
AVE.

kit

=mwm v

:

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System

%C 0L LARS
GO WELL WITH BOW OR FOUR-
IN-HAND 15 cts. each, 6 for9)cts-
CLUETT.PEABODY&CO.INC.MAK4RS

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co.
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

ALL FOREIGN STUDENTS
INITED TORECEPTION
Faculty to Entertain Men and Women
From Other Countries on
Dec. 2
About 200 invitations have been sent
out to the foreign students asking for
their presence at a reception which
will be given in Barbour gymnasium at
3 o'clock Saturday night, Dec. 2. Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins and Mrs.
Hutchins land the heads of the various
departments will- receive. A reception
of this kind was first given by the Uni-
versity authorities in 1914, and a re-
newal this year promises to make the
affair an annual event.
Prof. J. A. C. Hildner, chairman of

the board of advisers to foreign stu-
dents, will be iu charge of the pro-
gram. This will consist of singing,
recitations, short talks, and a variety
of other acts by the foreign students.
It is hoped that the majority of for-
eign students in the University will be
present at the reception and especial-
ly the new students who entered this
fall.
All foreign students are invited to
the social function whether they re-
ceive invitations or not, due to the
fact that Professor Hildner may not
have their names.
Roast sirloin steak dinner, Michigan
Union today. 85 cents. 26
The finest Floral Shop in the city
will open soon in the Nickels Arcade,
State Street. 3-tf
Use The Michigan Daily Want Ads,
for results.

a sealed book.
The strength of tlie German army or
peace footing is one per cent of th
population or about 650,000 men, an
83,000 non-commissioned officers and
about25,000 commissioned officers.
But opposed to the system in vogu
in England and the United States, this
army (aside from the officers) does
not consist of professional soldiers
but of youths undergoing a military
training who have no intention of be
ing soldiers at all unless their coun-
try should be involved in war. It i
no more and no less than a school in
which the officers are the teachers.
These are comparatively permanent
while the "pupils" go to school, get
through with it and get out again.
All Classes Attend School
All classes of the population from
the highest to the lowest pass through
this school. The nobleman and the
peasant, the judge on the bench, and
the doorkeeper of his cotirt, the phy-
sician and the man who drives his
carriage, the wealthy manufacturer,
and the man that takes his wage-all
"serve," and for a certain period of
their lives they are all treated alike,
for the army handles all classes with
ungloved hands.
Able-bodied men in all walks of life
are supposed to pass through this
school. Most of them serve for two
years in the infantry, some for three
years in the artillery or cavalry. Dur-
ing this time that state takes posses-
sion of them and pays all their ex-
penses. The training is thorough and
the discipline rigid. Through them
vast numbers of young men learn for
the first time what it is to put forth
real (effort and to obey.
Young men who have had at least
nine years of education in the high-
er public schools and who pay their
own expenses during their term of
service may at their option serve only
one year in any branch of the army.
At the end of their year (after having
taken some special examinations),
they are promoted to the rank of of-
ficers of the reserve.
Soldiers Learn Trade
It is evident that the German gov-
ernment makes a rather heavy de-
mand upon the time of its able-bodied
male population. But this time is not
wholly lost. What is gained in dis-
cipline, orderly habits, cleanliness,
and prompt obedience goes far toward
making up what is lost in time. The
astonishing development which Ger-
man industries have to show, is to no
small extent due to the discipline
which the workmen and managers
have been subjected to in the army.
Furthermore, men have a good oppor-
tunity to perfect themselves in, or
even to learn, trades of all kinds such
as those of the cobbler, tailor, cook,
and clerk.
Without doubt there are Germans
who would rather not have to spend
two or th'ree years in this school
furnished by the army. No American
keenly enjoys paying taxes. But sen-
sible Americans regard it as neces-
sary that taxes should be paid and
good Americans pay them with grace.
Military service in Germany, how-
ever, is by no means so unpopular as

is the payment of taxes in America.
All classes are obliged to serve, so
that no one feels that he is being dis-
criminated against. Nor are the years
of service generally disliked. Young
Germans are generally proud of hav-
ing served and with the masses of the
people the army is not unpopular
either.
Position Demands Army
It must always be kept in mind that
the size of the army is determined by
the representatives of the people, and
that, therefore, the military system is
the expression of its will and repre-
sents its judgment of what is called
for by the situation.
It is not my privilege at this time to
enter into a discussion of the phrase
"German militarism," that has been
so liberally displayed upon the ban-
ners of certain agitators. I wish, how-
ever, to conclude my remarks by re-
minding my readers that the German
army, which is there by the will of
the German people, is there not in
order to satisfy the militaristic spirit
or jingoismof the nation, but for
sheer necessity.
Germany is vulnerable on two sides
by land, by nations who have support-
ed both in proportion to their popula-
tion and geographical situation a con-
siderably larger army than Germany,
and this previous to the existence of
the present German army. This men-
ace, therefore, justifies in the opinion
of the German people, a burden, which
under no other conditions they could
have been induced to take upon them-
selves.

TYPEWRITING
MULTIGRAPHIN4
MIMEOGRAPHI
Typewriters for sale or re
Hamilton Business Coil

Electric Auto Heater--Keeps Your Engine Wax
Costs very little to operate
Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Quyality
It its not Rigut we make it Right
Phone 273 200 East Washington it.

ii

Varsity Toggery Shop
1107 So. Univ.

WOMEN'S LEAGUE BEGINS
WORK 'FOR RED CROSS
Members to Meet Two Afternoons Each
Week to Make Articles for
Comfort Bags
Tooth brushes, chocolate, pipes, soap,
towels, and mouth organs-these are
some of the articles to be placed in
the comfort bags, which the Womeir's
league, in conjunction with the nation-
al Red Cross, in preparing to send to
the soldiers for Christmas. Under the
direction of the social service commit-
tee of the' league, college women will
meet two afternoons a week at Bar-
bour gymnasium to make and fill these
bags.
The first meeting will be held at 3
o'clock, Tuesday, Nov. 28, at the gym-
nasium, and all girls are urged to help,
and to come in for only a short time,
if they cannot be present all after-'
noon. Townswomen are also invited
r
to help, as it is the hope of the com-
mittee to make and fill 100 of these
bags, to be sent off before Christmas.
The league is the only agency doing
Red Cross work in Ann Arbor this
year.
After Christmas the work will be-
come more general and will include
tearing and rolling of bandages, com-
press foldinF, and if possible, garment
making. College women in all the
state universities and eastern colleges
are actively engaged in this sort of
relief work, and it is hoped that Michi-
gan may add her share.
Elizabeth Hall, '18, is chairman of'
the social service committee, under
which the work is to be done, and she,
will be assisted by Mrs. ,Burr, who has,
had experience in directing war relief
work.

w

A Delicious Lunch
can be quickly prepared, and without the slights
trouble, on an
-. Electric Chafing Dish
This handsome and very convenient table utensil is
source of both comfort and pride to the housewi
Just the thing for a hasty lunch or Sunday supp
c Cooks practically any dish you have a desire 1
-makes toothsome fudge. No trouble; no alcohol;
messing. Just attach to a lamp-socket.
Come in and Inspect them.
I The Detroit Edison Cc
Cor. Main and William Sts. Tel. 23(
ISigl l lll11ll t litlllllltllrtiltllllllt 11|1111lI 111rlrrrt 1lltlllll1 11 8il

F.

Beautiful Dance and Banquet Pro-
grams,Party Decorations, Favors, Fine
Leather and Brass Goods, good Sta-
tionery and Engraving, as well as fine
Printing and Binding at reasonable
prices, is what The Mayer-Scharer Co.
at 112 S. Main St., has to offer the stu-
dents of the University of Michigan.

est

s a
fe.
er.
for
no

J"
00

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Have you something that
you want to sell? If so, let the Mich-
igan Daily sell it for you through its
Classified Department.
FOR SALE-Microscope and surgical
instriuments. 608 Pearl St. Ypsi-
lanti. Phone 89-M. 26-28-29-30-1-2
FOR SALE--An overcoat in good con-
dition, cheap. Size 34. Call 1394-l.
26
MISCELLANEOUS
TYPEWRITERS of all makes
bought, sold, rented or ex-
changed. Expert repairing,
factory service. Sole agent Under-
wood & Corona. TYPEWRITING,
MIMEOGRAPHING & SUPPLIES.
0. D. MORRILL, 322 S. State +t.
(Over Baltimore Lunch). 582-J.

LOST.

LOST-A rain coat and Fresh. Lit.
toque were taken by mistake from
the Physics building last Thursday
night. Please call Ulvid at 315 N.
State. 1363-R. 26
LOST-During past week. Bill-fold
containing $5 bill and check for $2.
!'eward to finder if he will call
1505 or 960. Ask for Robinson. 26
LOST-Fraternity pin, Nu Sigma Nu,
name on back. Reward. Call Arn-
ol-, phone 397. 26
WA NTED
WANTED - Roommate wanted to
share suite furnished in exchange
for doing chores about the house.
Kitchen and all supplies furnished;
can get our own meals, if we desire.
510 Lawrence St. 26
WANTED-A young lady stenographer
at Mack & Co. 23-24-25-26-28-29

Roast chicken dinner, Mich.
today. $1.00.

Union

The best place to try out
VICTROLA RECORDS
Is in your own home
Oxar Approval Service
permits you to do this
Call us up and ask us about it.

STYLUS, WOMEN'S HONORARY
SOCIETY, ELECTS MEMBERS
Stylus, women's honorary literary
society, has elected the following wom-
en to membership: Helen Frank, grad.,
Gertrude Miller, grad., Margaret
Klein, '18, and Grace Ackerman, '18.
Dixie Club to Elect Officers Monday
The Dixie club will have a special
business meeting at the Union at 7:30
o'clock Monday evening. All mem-
bers of the society are urgently re-
quested to be present, for the purpose
of electing a president for the present
school year and plan out a definite
schedule for coming events.
Roast sirloin beef dinner at Union
today. 60 cents. 26
Watch for the grand opening of Ann
Arbor's Finest Floral Shop. Nickels
Arcade. 3-tfi

St. Johns Students to Meet S
Between 30 and 40 Michigan stude
who formerly attended St. Johns h
school will gather for their first
tumn meeting sometime during
week after Thanksgiving. In the p
they have organized to urge promih
athletes and scholars from the cen
Michigan town to attend the Univ
sity, and have sent to their high sch
some of the University publicatio
It is expected that the same policy v
be considered at the meeting i
week, when the club will elect new
ficers.
Miners May Get Old Age Pensi
Recommendations have been m
to the United Mine Workers of A
erica that pensions be paid to me
bers over 60 years old.
Flannel Shirts made to order. G.
Wild Company. Leading merch
tailors. State street.

Grinnell Brors.

116 S. Maia St.
]PHONE 1707

r U

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