100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 26, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I "M - a ,

FOR ANN ARBOR-
AY-FAIR AND RISING
TEMPERATURE

I

i.4
a' j
a
h'P
'

,
-

i )
JOANw

101

_. '
...+.o+" "..

r
h
r* '
AE "
4 tip:. ff ,c

UNITELF PRESS WIR
DAY AND N(IIT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER ]
ANN ARBOR

I

. XXVII. No. 48.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CEN'

__
- ,

FORCES FIGHTING.
HAN TO HANDIN
CHIHAHUA CITY
REPORT THAT VILLA : CCUPIES
CITY AT PRESENT
SCOUTED
200 BANDITS NEAR BORDER
Presence of Quevedo's 200 Guerillas
Threatens Juarez Rail-
way Line
El Paso, Nov. 25-In.a desperate as-
sault on Chihuahua City, Pancho Villa
gained a foothold in the city itself and
hand to hand fighting was in progress
in the streets, United States depart-
ment agents learned late today. The
latest reports were that Villista forces
had entered one side of the city. Late
tonight no advices of the outcome of
the struggle for possession of the city
had reached the border.
On the streets of Juarez rumors were
circulated tonight that the Villistas
had occupied Chihuahua City and that
General Trevino had been routed, but
United States agents said there was
little foundation for these rumors.
The presence of 200 Villistas com-
manded by Sylvester Quevedo, 18 miles
south of the American border on the
Jirarez-Chihuahua City railway line,
caused General Gonzales, Juarez com-
mander, to order 100 Carranzista
troops out to guard the bridge a few
miles outside Juarez. Attempts to get
supplies of ammunition to General
Trevino were abandoned.
Late today a United States govern-
ment oficial transmitting reports to
Washington said, "Until 1.0 o'clock to-
day General Trevino had been able to
repel every assault of the bandits
upon Chihuahua City. In only a few
instances had the bandits been able to
get any distance into the city. Each
time they were forced out, but we
have authentic information that Villa
had succeeded in penetrating into a
portidn of the town and has been hold-
ing it for hours."
BALDWIN TO ADDRESS MENORAH
Illinois Professor Talks on "A Time
That Tries Men's Souls."
"A Time That Tries Men's Souls is
the subject of an address to be de-
fvered before the Michigan Menorah
society when that organization meets
tonight at 8 o'clock in Newberry hall,
by Prof. Edward Chauncey Baldwin of
the department of English literature
of the University of Illinois.
At the close of the address by Pro-
fessor Baldwin, the society will pro-
ceed to the election of a. delegate to
represent it at the convention of the
Intercollegiate Menorah association,
whiqh will be held at Minneapolis,
from Dec. 26 to 29.
SOMME ATTAK STOPS ShOT
ACCORDING TO BERLIN REIORT
Berlin, Nov. 25.-"The great Somme
battle has again stopped short, and
the great hope of the Anglo-French
for the 'great style' attack on the
Ancre have been buried again," said
a special review of the French "ront
lighting issued by the press bureau
tonight.
The charge is made against both the

British and French that they are sub-
jecting their colonial troops, Autural-
ians, New Zealanders, Canadians. andy
others to the brunt ofthe fighting in
this "senseless attack."
"The gigantic use of men and am-
munition is once more fruitless," the
statement said. It poinzed out British
predictions that Bapaume woul t be
captured, but said the sacrifice oa 60,-
000 men still found the allies without
the city after 45 days of fighting.

ClaimU-oats in
American Waters
British Authorities Warn Allied Ship
Owners That Fighting Subs
Elude Patrol
New York, Nov. 25.---Reports of two
fighting German submarines sinking
merchantmen off the American coast
are expected here again by shipping
circles following a report that the
British admiralty has warned allied
ship owners that two U-boats eluded
the British patrols and are headed for
American waters.
Fast destroyers and cruising patrols
have been warned and are on the look-
out for the raider, reports here de-
clared. . Shipping men today under-
stood that the admiralty had advised
the merchantmen that Germany is ex-
pected to repeat the performances of
the U-53 when it became evident that
the United States would not protest.
According to reports here one of the
U-boats is expected to operate off
Halifax to catch British transports
carrying Canadian troops to England
and the other is expected to operate
off Nantucket in the waters visited by
the U-53.
Announce Senior
Lit Committees
If. Gray Muzzy, president of, the
senior literary class, has announced
the following committees for the en-
,uing year:F
Class, day-Kemp S. Brge, chair.
man; H. C. Garrison, Harold O'Brien,
Theodore Cox, Margaret T. Yocum, J.
0. Hartsig, Helen Bush. Class me-
morial--Stanley Smith, chairman; W.
T1. Adams, John Connelly, Earl Ellis,
Helen Beaumont, Alice H. Vanselow,
Anita Kelley. 6otg-Rorace Davis,
chairman; Edward Sachs, D. T..Mc-
° ne, J. Fishbach, Jr.
Reception~ Lous Arentz, chairman;
Nathan C. Towne,Clarence Patterson,
Theodore Wurster, B. Knelland, F.
Way, G. Whelan. Souvenir-Cecil
Cross, chairman; Cyril Talbot, W. A.
Niemann, M. Bassett Edith Kimmel.
invitation--Willis Nance, chairman;
Trank Nesbitt, Philip Warriner, Ger-
.eys Grylls, Winifred Roehm, Mabel
Christian, Geta Tucker. Banquet-
Vernon Sellars, chairman; Conrad
Church, John Robbins, Leonard Nieter.
Pipe and cane-R. Wheeler, chair-
man; W. K. Niemann, Archie MlIssac,
Kenneth Wesley. Cap and gown-Ed-
ward Mack, chairman; Tom Darnton,
Ellis Slater, C. M. Jickling, Genevieve
O'Leary, Dorothy Diss, Janet MFar-
lane. Promenade---John Langs, chair-
Han; Lee Joslyn, Perry Holmes, Les-
lie Hopkinson, Marjorie Needham,
Irene Lichtman, Ruth Stellwagon.
Social-l-arold Fitzgerald, chair-
san; Jhn Codd, H. M. Birmingham,
(Continued on Page Six.)
TALKS ON CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
V. 0, Str.ckler of Boston to Lecture
ii University Hall Today
Virgil . Strickler of Boston, Mass.,
will deliver a free lecture on Chris-
tian Science at 3 o'clock this after-
noon in University Hall. Mr. Strick-
lcr is a member of the board of lec-
treship of the First Church of Christ,
Scientist, in Boston. The lecture is
held under the ausices of the Chris-
tian Science society of the University
of Michigan.

ENTHUSIASM AT
FINAL MEETINGS
OF CONFERENCE
MORNiN G SESSIONS TREAT WITH
MATTERS OF PUBLIC
HEALTH
PROMINENT SPEAKERS APPEAR

Spotlight Sho'
Obtains Talent

FOOTBALL SCORES

Nationalities to Be Represented
rnion Vaudeville at Hill
Auditorium

in

Yale, 6; Harvard, 3.
Army, 15; Navy, 7.
Georgetown, 79; Bucknell, 0.
New York University, 6; Colum-
bia, 0.

Field

of Nursing for Women Ably De-
scribed by Detroit Au-,
thority

Enthusiasm and interest attended
the last sessions of the vocational con-
Cerence for women Saturday morning
and noon. The forenoon session deal-
ing especially with matters pertaining
to the public health, was in the hands
of Dr. Elsie S. Pratt, of the health
service. Mrs. Victor C. Vaughn, Jr.,
of Detroit being unable to be present,
was represented by Mrs. Getter, head
of the visiting nurses of Detroit, who
spoke on the subject of "City Work in
Public Health."
Briefly, she outlined the history of
nursing throughout the ages, placing
especial emphasis on the, consecration
and self-sacrifice of the nurses.
Through a mistaken idea of economy,
nursing was placed in the hands of
the criminal classes in England about
two centuries ago, and was only res-
cued from the depths to which it had
fallen by the efforts of Florence Night-
ingale and her associates.
Explains Hospital Work.
Miss Elizabeth Harcourt of the Uni-
versity hospital ably handled the sub-
ject of "Social Work in the Hospitals."
"The scope of the hospital social work-
er," she said, "is as broad as the
need of mankind. It is the results of
poor social conditions which must here
be combated, the ignorance of food and
money values, and the failure of man-
kind to realize his responsibility to
his neighbor."
Emphasizing again the keynote of
modern endeavor "service," W. W.
lishop, of the University Library; Miss
Mary Malcomson, of the Detroit bureau
of occupations; Mrs. Edmund Schmidt,
of Urbana, Ill., and Miss Mary Mar-
shall, of Lansing, addressed the guests
at the luncheon} held in Barbour gym-
nasium Saturday noon.
Librarian Treats Social Service.
Mr. Bishop spoke on the "Attitude of
College Women" toward library work.
"Library work," said Mr. Bishop, "is
social service work, and it cannot be
made anything else. Successful li-
brarianships are of as much vital serv-
ice to the community as any other kind
of social service work, even though
the field is directed toward serving
students, professors, and all who seek
the library for books, or any informa-
tion."
The purpose and work which gov-
erns the Detroit bureau of occupations
was enthusiastically described by Miss

From Scotland to South America, the
nations of the world will be repre-
sented in the Union spotlight vaude-
ville, in Hill auditorium, Tuesday even-
ing. The latest additions to the en-
tertainment cast are Cecil F. Cross, '17,
Varsity weight man, who will sing
ballads of his native Scotland, and
Carlos Zanelli, '17E, who will present
some of the arias that made him fa-
mous in far off Chile.
Rehearsals will be held this after-
noon, tonight, and tomorrow night
when dress rehearsal will be staged in
Hill auditorium. There was a steady
demand for tickets at the Union all
day yesterday, and it is expected that
the hall will be filled to the roof
Tuesday night.
Those taking part in the minstrels
are as follows: Interlocutor, Morrison
C. Wood, '1'7; end men, H. W. Gold-
stick, '17D, L. B. Emmerman, '18L, L.
S. Saunders, '19, Ernest Cohen, '19, C.
L. Fordney, '17E, Mike Allen, ex-'19,
E. L. Wienner, '18L, Walter R. Atlas,
'18, C. L. Goldstein, '17, H. J. Lance,
'19; chorus. Kemp Keena, '19, C. F.
Cross, '17, D. C. Stimson, '18, D. J. De-
Butts, '18E, J. M. }Bailey, '19, R. L.
Hardy, '17, L. A. Lundgren, '19, J.tA.
Dorsey, '19, and J. Fishbach, '17.
The orchestra under the direction of
Abe Gornetzky, '17, will number 14
pieces. The show was written by E.
E. Pardee, '17, and Roy H. Fricken, '19.
Mary Malcomson. "Detroit felt the
need for a long time~ for a bureau to
obtain positions for University gradu-
ates other than teaching," she as-
serted, "and, although the bureau is
young,and struggling to keep alive fi-
nancially, positions are daily being
found for those seeking them. Trained
women are being placed'in positions
best suited to them, thus preventing
more misfits in life."
Practical Women Needed.
"The Relationship of the Association
of Collegiate Alumni to the College
Girl" was the subject of the talk given
by Mrs. Edmund Schmidt, of the Uni-
versity of Illinois. "Where are the
women to do the necessary thing,
scientifically and successfully?" said
Mrs. Schmidt. "The answer is, 'In the
practically trained woman.,'
Miss Mary Marshall, whose address
was postponed from the morning ses-
sion, spoke on the "Field of Nursing
for Women." She said, "The chief duty
of public health has come to be the
prevention of sickness and disease,
rather than the cure of them. The mod-
ern germ theory and scientific discov-
eries are responsible for the change."
New York, Nov. 25.-Messages of
good will from the chancellories of
three of Europe's warring powers
were read at the annual dinner of the
League to Enforce Peace.

Springfield, 63;
Aggies, 6.

Massachusetts
11

Syracuse, 20; Tufts, 16.
Washington and Jefferson, 41;
Chattanooga, 0.
Ohio State, 23, Northwestern, 3.
Wisconsin, 0; Illinois, 0.
Minnesota, 49; Chicago, 0.
Purdue, 0; Indiana, 0.
Nebraska, 34; Iowa, 17.
Notre Dame, 46; Alma, 0.
Kalamazoo College, 34; Notre
Dame Fresh, 7.
STUDENT;COUNCIL
ASKS FORSUPPORT
Administrative Organization Plans to
Become Intimately Acquainted
With Student Sentiment
STATES POSITION IN LETTERS
Members of the student council
have compiled a letter to the student
body of the university for the purpose
of giving the students an idea of the
council's policy in regard to the de-
ciding of vital issues of the campus.
In the main the council asks for the
students' co-operation as can be seen
in the following letter:
"To the Student Body of the Univer-
sity of Michigan:','
"As the administrative agent of the
Michigan student body, the student
council has this year more than ever
sought to broaden and direct its ac-
tivities in the interest of the whole
University. A better Michigan and a
self-expressing Michigan is the coun-
cil's aim. In other words, it alms to
become, not only the administrative,
but the policy-forming division of the
student body. The council ought to be,
in every way, the political center of
the campus. To become such, it must
be in intimate touch with campus opin-
ion; it wants to be truly representa-
tive. It asks for practicable ideas, be-
yond what its own members can fur-
nish; and it asks for co-operation.
New Features of Work.
"To make co-operation effective, the
council wishes to call attention to
three new features of its work:
"(1) A regular office for the presi-
dent and secretary has been installed
on the fourth floor of University hall.
During certain hours of the, week (to
be announced later), a council officer
will be present to receive complaints
and suggestions, and to give informa-
tion.
"(2) The revised council constitu-
tion, to be issued shortly, will be dis-
tributed to the student body, so far as
the demand warrants. The council
would like to have its organization and
powers a matter of common knowl-
edge.
"(3), The council wishes to em-
phasize a thing which has been stated
before; namely, that its meetings are
open to the student body. The regu-
lar meeting is held every other Thurs-
day evening at 7:30 o'clock in Mason
hall. Students interested in council
procedure, or students with a definite
(Continued on Page Six.)

COLD HALL FILS
TO CHECK SPIRIT
CAKES, CIDER, AND DOUGHNUTS
PASSED FREELY AMONG
1,500 STUDENTS
LETTERS AWARDED TO PLAYERS
Speeches Appropriate to Occasion;
Members of Squad Respond
to Call
With the thermometer hovering
around the freezing point, 1,500 stu-
dents stood in long lines outside
Weinberg's coliseum awaiting thgir
turn to be admitted to the 1916 foot-
ball smoker last night. Despite the
intense cold within the hall,
the spectators crowded about the
numerous tables supplying themselves
with cakes, cider, and . doughnuts.
Each was presented with a tin cup, a
corncob pipe and a package of cigarets
upon entering.
James Schermerhorn, editor of the
Detroit Times, was given a rousing
welcome after his introduction by
Harry L. Cault, '17L, who was chair-
man of the program. Mr. Schermer-
horn employed a fund of apt stories
and anecdotes, and declared that the
signs presaged a championship Mich-
igan team for the coming year.
Prof. William Henderson, of the
physics department assured the team
that whether in victory or defeat, the
men of Michigan were ever behind it.
Prof. H. R. Cross, of the literary de-
partment, briefly reviewed the per-
formances of the Varsity and express-
ed his belief that an undefeated team
was to be looked for in the not too
distant future. Staats Abrams, '17,
convinced the team that the insignia
about to be awarded had been well
merited and urged that they should be
worn upon Michigan's campus.
Prof. R. W. Aigler awarded the cer-
tificates. As the men were called to
the platform, their pictures were flash-
ed upon a screen, while "Bob's Ben-
nett, '18, Varsity cheer leader, direct-
ed the yells.
Maulbetsch, Dunne, Smith, Weske,
Niemann, Rehor, Zeiger, Martens,
Gracey, Raymond, Boyd, Peach, and
Wieman were forced to respond to the
insistent calls for "speech." Sparks
being absent from the ceremonies.
Captain Maulbetsch said, "At the be-
ginning of the season, my secret hopes
were not very high, but in spite of
the two defeats, I feel that the team
has. done good work; I am only sorry
that I can not be with them next sea-
son." Prolonged cheering followd
the remarks of the members of the
squad.
The Varsity band was at all times
in evidence and from their position in
fromnt of the platform led Michigan's
songs, being vigorously accompanied
by the audience.
Demand Larger Tips Because of War
St. Paul, Minn., Nov. 25.-Th&e ten
cent tip in St. Paul was officially ta-
booed, by resolutions of the hotel bell
men of St. Paul today. At the. inter-
mission between the icewater glide
and the suitcase shuffle, at the annual
bel1mens' ball, resolutions were passed
urging that tips be raised to 15 .cents
on account of the war.

London Funeral Follows Own Wishes
Oakland, Cal., Nov. 25.-The funeral
of Jack London was held here today
without religious services of any kind.
The body was cremated. The ashes,
in accordance with his wish, will be
scattered over his Glen Ellen ranch.

Presbyterian Church
HURON and DIVISION STS.

10;30 A.. .

M. Leonard A. Barrett, speaks;
"The Song of a Battle Field"
Noon:- Class for University Women
Prof. Thos. E. Rankin
Class for University Men
Mr. J. L. Zwickey

I A

SAVE FRIDAY DECEIBER, 15

For The

AWN ff8 ?yam-" _t mXIS CONCERT

i

= --=s------- -
ni First Methodist Chinch
lul11W
A.W.Saler . . iise
=I'
u1 0:30-"Duangerous Drifting~"
1111' MII!
I ,You are cordially invited. R
USE= EUZ lR d

By The.

Glee and Mandolin Club

Aeichstag Opposes "Home Army Bill"
Berlin, Nov. 25.-Hearings before
the coum"ittee on civilian work fore-
shadow that the government's "home
army bill" will not have entirely.
smooth sailing in the reichstag.

a

i
a

University Hal
3:00 P. A.

To-day

The Christian Science Society of the University of Michigan Announces a Free Lecture on
ShritiSene

By
Virgil 0. Strickler, C. S
of New "York
Member of the Bard of
Leetur-ship of The ;Mother
Church, The First Church
of Christ, Scientist in,

The

Is

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan