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November 24, 1916 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I 1N1LAIV Mx..r-i aIN. J-M L Y

- I(

b ;

I

Just received Another lot of those

I DON'T

FORGET

re ready to show you the
Line of Men's

Suits,

Hats

Caps and-
Furnishings

'
4
._..- --
t
"'
,..
.....
4

Feather Weight Soft Hats

at

$3.50

Sheep Lined Coat
And
Patricks Mackinaw

To Get Your

'I

WADHAMS & CO
MAIN ST.

Tinker & Company
Clothes, Furnishings and Hats
for
Particular Men.
Cor. S. State and William Sts.

At The

11

J. F. WUERTH CO.

I

New Day Light Store next to Orpheum

State St. Store
Nickels Arcade

! e
Centralized System of Education
Imbues Germans With Patriotism

mmmmmmmmmww

Winter Wear
FOR MEN

WE DO

ODD BOWS and TIES
and collars are hard to find. And when one finds
them, their prices are usually prohibitive. Perhaps
that is why girls happen in every now and then and
ask to be shown the new neckfixings--they are dis-
tinctive, and their prices are "just ordinary."
Main and Liberty
r a .

I

Your Floral Needs==
Are BEST SATISFIED By Us
PHONE 115 -
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION

-=COUSINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Otto T. Kreuser, '17, tells of "Pub-
lic Education in Germany" in the third
installment of a series of five articles
about that country.
The education of the German peo-
ple is in the hands of the various state
governments; that is, the govern-
ments of Prussia, Bavaria, Wurtem-
berg, Baden, Saxony, and so on, all
have their independent yet strongly
centralized systems. But all educa-
tion is more or less based upon the
same general scheme, the best example
of which is found in the Prussian sys-
tem. In this short discussion I shall
therefore limit myself to that.
A centralized state system of edu-
cation as opposed to a municipal sys-
tem, as we have in America, has one
great advantage: It has no difficulty in
concentrating upon one all-prevading
principle. Such a principle is well
expressed in the Prussian school law
which says: "The aim of the German
school is to sow the seeds of religiously
moral sentiment in the children so
that they may become citizens whose
inner worth can secure the welfare
and preservation of the state," and "to
give them the capacity for self-sacri-
fice, the determination to sacrifice life
and property for a great ideal."
It is seen, thei'efore. that the schools
do not merely serve as an agent for
the pounding of dry facts into the
heads of the German boys and girls.
but that they are a very significant
factor in making the people good
patriots. These ideas are again em-
phasized during the service in the
army, which serves as an important
educational factor in the life of the
people. The Germany army offers a
chance for all men to improve their
knowledge along many lines by teach-
ing them trades.
We may distinguish three classes1
of education in Germany, the tution
in all cases being either free or very
low. Special allowance is made in the<
cases of deserving poor boys.
The first class of education may bef

The second class is that preparatory
for a technical or commercial career
Great emphasis is placed upon modern
languages, mathematics, and science
together with the ordinary high schoo
subjects.
In the third class, great emphasis is
placed upon ancient languages and cul
ture, although science, mathematics
and modern languages also occupy a
prominent place. This training usual
ly leads to a professional life. From
it come the clergy, teachers, lawyers
and, physicians.
All three classes aim to teach the
children first, how to study to the
greatest advantage, and second, how
to reason correctly.
The completion of either class two or
three means that the student has at-
tained an education equal in quality
at least, to that of an American col-
lege graduate, and can at the age of
18 or 20 enter immediately upon grad-
uate work at a university. Either of
these courses require 12 years of hard
continued study. The completion of
the first nine years entitles the student
to a "certificate of privilege" in the
army. That means that the person so
qualified need serve but one year in
the army instead of two or three, and
is likely to be promoted to the rank
of reserve officer at the end of that
year.
Space does not permit me to go into
letails about the life in these schools.
I need only say that discipline is very
strict and that the studies require the
student's constant application.
On the whole we may say that the
German schools are extremely ef-
ficient and wisely arranged so as to
give the pupil, even in the early years
of study, a specific training along gen-
eral lines of learning he expects to
follow in later life.

Y
C.
n
.,
1
s
-
a,
-n

t

""""".

Electric Auto Heater--Keeps Your Engine Warm
Costs very little to operate
Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Quality
If its not Right we make it Right
Phone 273 200 East Washington St.

called rudimentary. It corresponds to
our grammar schools and is obligatory
for all those who do not intend to at-
tend the higher schools of learning.
The large majority of the people get
their education here.

VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP
1107 So. Univ.

I

Our Beautiful Dance and Banquet
Programs still continue to be one of
the many pleasant surprises and main
topics at the parties.

TYPEWRITING
MULTIGRAPHING
MIMEOGRAPHING
Typewriters for sale or rent.
Hamilton Business College

11

THE MAYER-SCHAIRER CO.
112 S. Main

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System

............

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co.
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.
CHOP off a few
minutes and eat some of
GEORGE'S SUEY
WAI KING ,OO
314 S. State St. Phone 1244-M
FORECASTS FOOD EMBARGO
Representative Threatens to Introduce
Measure in Congress
Washington, Nov. 23.-A bitter fight
in the house over the question of a
foodstuffs embargo was forecasted to-
day. In a formal statement. Repre-
sentative Fitzgerald, chairman of the
appropriations committee and leader
of Tammany's delegation in the house,
announced he would introduce a food
embargo resolution.
Representatives from rural districts
immediately declared that if Fitzgerald
pushed his proposed resolution, they
would counter, demanding an embargo

MARLEY 23 IN..
DEVON 2f IN.
C OLLARS
15 cts. each, 6 for 90 cts.
CLUETT. PEABODY & co., INC. MAKERS
on manufactured materials for which
they said farmers are paying greatly
increased prices.
"There are two reasons why con-
gress should embargo foodstuffs," said
Fitzgerald in a formal statement.
"First, it is the most effective weapon
in our controversy with Great Britain,
in her unwarranted outrages and in-
defensible black lists against Ameri-
can merchants; second, the embargo
should be imposed for purely domestic
reasons. The prices of foodstuffs have
reached levels that are bringing wide-
spread distress to the country."
May Have Three Dollar Wheat
New York, Nov. 23.-Three dollar
wheat if the European war continues
for a year or so more, was predicted
this afternoon by Edward A. Haga-
man. grain buyer for the allies, just
back from a trip through the western
grain centers. "It is not beyond rea-
son to expect bread riots if the war
keeps up two years longer," he said.
SOMETHING BIG AT ARMORY TO-
NIGHT. 24

I. C, JOHNSON, 16, TELLS
OF "YSWORK IN INDIA
President Hutchins Receives Letter
From June Graduate Describ-
ing Recreation Camps

EMMA GOLDMAN SPEAKS
O0N LABOR RELIEF FUNI
New Organization Developed to Pro
tect Workers from Publie's
Eagerness to Convict

SPEAKERS ADDRESS FOREIGN
STUDENTS AT TWO MEETINGS
Dates for two receptions for students
in the University who come from for-
eign countries, have been arranged
under the auspices of the University
Y. M. C. A. Mr. Chuan, national sec-
retary to Chinese students in America,
will address the Chinese students on
Dec. 2. Following his address a re-
ception will be held in Newberry hall
at which Chinese students, "Y" of-
ficials and a number of faculty men
will be present. Mr. Charles D. Hur-
rey of New York, who was also to have
spoken at this meeting, will be unable
to come to Ann Arbor at this time.
From Dec. 15 to 17 Professor Raphel
A.' Soto of the University of Illinois
will be here to address Latin-Ameri-
can students and to confer with them.
A reception will be held by Latin-
American students while he is here.
Professor Soto is himself a native of
Porto Rico.
To Receive Foreign Students Saturday
The Cosmopolitan club will hold its
annual fall reception for foreign stu-
dents in Barbour gymnasium Satur-
day, Dec. 2, at 8 o'clock. President
Harry B. Hutchins and Mrs. Hutchins,
and the departmental heads and their;
wives will receive.
A wise head wears a guaranteed hat,
in a certified style. See Davis at 1191
Main. 21&24'
1

ALL PEACE CONTEST ORATIONS
TO BE HANDED IN BY NOV. 25
Orations intended for the University
peace contest to be held this year,
must be in the hands of Ray K. Immel,
of the oratory department by Saturday,
Nov. 25.
The same system of eliminations as
has been tried in the past will be used
this year to pick the men who will
appear in the final local contest, two
men each being chosen from the jun-
ior and senior classes, and one from
the sophomore class. The winner of
the local contest will compete in the
state contest, the place of meeting of
which has not yet been decided upon.
The sectional state contest, in which
the winners of the state contests will
meet and contest for the honor of rep-
resenting their section of the United
States, will decide the contestants who
will compete in the annual national
contest held at the Lake Mohawk con-
ference.
Penn Alumni Hold Reunion Tuesday
Graduates of the University of Mich-
igan living in Pennsylvania, will hold
a reunion meeting next Tuesday, at
Ambridge, Pa.
The recent meeting of" Michigan
alumni at Houghton, Michigan, proved
so successful that reunions are being
planned in other states.
Lessons in Fancy Work, 50 cents per
hour. Orders filled for Xmas. Phone
740-M. 34-24-25-26.

President Harry B. Hutchins re-
ce:Ved a letter from Irwin C. Johnson,
'16, Wednesday, in which Mr. Johnson
tells of the work he is doing in the Y.
M. C. A. war camps in Mesopotamia,
and of the country in which he is
working.
"I have been at this station for the
past few weeks," writes Mr. Johnson,
"attempting to organize the recreation
for approximately 3,000 convalescent
English troops who have been sent
here from the Mesopotamian front. We
supply stationery for the men, in ad-
dition to magazines, newspapers, and
other periodicals.
"We also have in each center, games,
ping-pong tables, and various other
recreational mediums. During the
week we attempt to follow out a series
of evening programs which combine
the religious, recreational, and educa-
tional. These programs include con-
certs, cinema shows, religious meet-
ings, and illustrated lectures on a
wide variety of subjects.
"During the past two weeks," Mr.
Johnson continues, "I have had the
privilege of quite an extensive travel
in southern India. The Indian peo-
ples, religion, and customs of the coun-
try, have been no less a revelation
than the country itself. The India of
the past, a country of jungle, wild
an'mals, and inferior civilization, no
longer exists in spite of the precon-
ceived notions of the average un-
sophisticated occidental. I confess I
was disappointed to see tram cars a
much more common sight than ele-
phants when I landed in Bombay."
Mr. Johnson then, went on to tell of
other Michigan men who are doing
work in the east. Among them, O. O.
Stanchfield, '07, is general secretary
of the Y. M. C. A. in Bangalore, India,1
and Waldo Hunt, '16, and Raymond
Flynn, '16, are doing the same work
that Mr. Johnson is engaged -in.
Mistake in Prof. Humphreys' Hours
A mistake was made in yesterday's
publication of Prof. W. R. Humphreys'
office hours as chairman of the elig-1
ib Iity committee. Professor Hum-1
phreys will meet from 3:30 to 4:30
o'clock on Thursdays, instead of from;
2:30 to 4:30, as was announced. Pro-
fessor Humphreys may be seen inl
room 8, University hall, not in Tappan1
hall.

Miss Emma Goldman, the noted an-
archist, who will appear in Ann Ar-
bor at Woodman's hall on Dec. 4, 5, 6,
and 7, has been called beck to New
York from her tour of the central
states to speak on "Free Speech" at a
meeting of a newly formed organiza-
tion interested in the establishment of
a fund for the defense of the laboring
class. Miss Goldman will be on the
same platform with Burke Cochran, a
prominent lawyer in the east, and
Frank P. Walsh, chairman of the in-
dustrial relations commission ap-
pointed by the president two years
ago.
The workers' relief fund has de-
veloped from the fact that in times
of riot and disorderly activities the
union workers have not been afforded
adequate protection by the civil au-
thorities. In many cases the inno-
cent union men have been deprived of
a court hearing and placed in confine-
ment without bail. Recently officials
at Los Angeles have sent three sus-
pects to the penitentiary for a life
term on the grounds that they were
instrumental in forming a bomb plot
which resulted in the death of five par-
ticipants of a preparedness parade. It
is claimed that none of these men were
allowed a fair trial since public opin-
ion ordered that someone pay the
penalty for the castastrophe.
Patrick Quinlan, lately pardoned by
the governor of New Jersey, was avic-
tim of the public's eagerness to con-
vict without justification. He was
speaking at a union meeting in Pater-
son at 8 o'clock, the same night a riot
40 miles away occurred. Promptly the
authorities jailed him and it has been
just recently that they have perceived
their mistake.
England Willing to Hear Peace Plans
London, Nov. 23.-Discussing peace
with a group of American newspaper
correspondents today, Lord Derby de-
clared that any proposal from Ger-
many at this time would be met with
the consideration it merited. He added
that any proposals "giving up what
we are fighting for will not be con-
sidered for an instant," and that Eng-
land's position still is exactly as
Lloyd-George outlined in his recent in-
terview with the United Press.
If you must study, be comfortable
in a Davis bathrobe and slippers to
match. Davis.at 119 Main. . 21&24

LOST
LOST-Somewhere on the east side of
State St., a jeweled Sigma Pi fra-
ternity pin. Finder call 1211-R. Re-

ward.

23-241

WANTED
WANTED-Barber for Saturday. Ap-
ply at 108 Washington street. Phone
281-. C. T. Petrie, proprietor.
22-23-24
WANTED-Student to help in store
and repair bicycles. H. L. Switzer
Co., 310 S. State. 24-25-26
WANTED--A young lady stenographer
at Mack & Co. 23-24-25-26-28-29
MISCELLANEOUS

LOST-Taken by mistake from Engin-
eering building, a lady's transparent
brown raincoat. Please return to

11

Martha Cook building.

24

LOST-A pin, gold cowl surrounded
by pearls. Reward offered for re-
turn. Call Lambert, 2189-WY'. 23-24
LOST--Let the Michigan Daily find
that lost article of yours through
one of its classified advertisements

TYPEWRITERS of all makes
bought, sold, rented or ex-
changed. Expert repairing,
factory service. Sole agent Under-
wood & Corona. TYPEWRITING,
MIMEOGRAPHING & SUPPLIES.
0. D. MORRILL, 322 S. State St.
(Over Baltimore Lunch). 582-J.

The best place to try out
VICTROLA RECORDS
Is in your own home
Oiir- Approval Service
permits you to do this
Call us up and ask us about it.

I

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Main .
PHONE 1707

"KEN" BOUCHER, BELL
IST, AT ARMORY TONIGHT.

SOLO'
24

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