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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 22, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FOR ANN ARBOR-
WEDNESDAY-PROBABLY
FAIf

Or. JL
Alt
F

UNITED PRESS WIR
DAY AND NIGHT SERTICE
T"lE ONLY MORNING PAPER I
ANN ARBOR

I

6.

VOL. XXVI. No. 44. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1916. PRICE FIVE c

FOTBALL SMOKER
TO BE HELD NEXT
SAT NIGHT

Rail Men Firm in
Light Hour Stand
Waren S. Stone, President of Rail-
road iBrotherhood, Shows De-
termination for Law
Baltimore, Nov. 21.-"There is going

PLAY WILL NOT BE
GIVEN NEXT MONTH

(CommI-tee on Dramatics Finds
Submitted by Comedy Club
Unsuitable

Play

EDWIN B. PALMER, 17, CHAIRMAN, to be an eight-hour law on the rail-

E~XPECT1S 2,00 TO BE
PRESENT

SOHERMERHORN TO GIVE TALK
To Mark Last Appearance in Public
of Senior Members of
Team
"We want 2,000 men to come down to
Weinberg's coliseum Saturday night
to cheer for the last time for the team
which only two drop kicks kept from
the championship of America," said
Edwin B. Palmer, '17, chairman of the
annual football smoker committee last
night.
"This is the last time that 'Johnnie'
Maulbetsch, the greatest Michigan
halfback in years, will appear in pub-
li^. The last time that 'Fritz' Rehor,
'Morrie' Dunne, 'Wally' Niemann, and
'Zeig' Zeiger will be seen before the
student body. Every man in the Uni-
versity who can beg, borrow, or steal
25 cents ought to attend the smoker
Saturday night. Miller Pontius says
that the 1916 team has more spirit and
fight than any other team he ever
heard of, and if it hadn't gotten all the
bad'breaks would have been at the top
of the football heap this fall."
James Schermerhorn of Detroit is
scheduled as the. main speaker of the
evening. Mr. Schermerhorn spoke at
the smoker two years ago.
At a late hour last night President
Harry B. Hutchins refused to permit
the football smoker committee to hold
the event scheduled for Waterman
gymnasium next Saturday night in that
place. President Hutchins yielded to
the persuasions of Dr. George May,
who claimed that the new gymnasium
floor would be iirreparably injured by
the great crowd that is expected. In-
stead of the gymnasium the commit-
tee has secured Weinberg's coliseum.
TEN INITIATED BY VULCANS
Senior Engineering Honorary Society
Holds Banquet
The clanging of anvils on the cam-
pus Tuesday afternoon announced the
advent of 10 senior engineers into the
portals of the Vulcans, senior engineer-
ing honorary society. The initiates
are: Willis Brodhead, R. J. Dondero, J.
V. Kuivinen J. F. Meade, J. F. Newell,
Maurice Nicholls, J. R. Pollock, A. A.
Schupp, C. 0. Skinner, and H. S. Tay-
lor.
After the ceremonies the inititates
were banqueted at the Catalpa Inn. H.
A. Taylor was toastmaster and
speeches were given by Professors
Riggs and Johnston of the engineer-
ing department, H. L. Carroll and J.
F. Meade. -
Discusses Women Wage Problem
Members of the Adelphi house of
representatives met last night and dis-
cussed a bill to establish a federal
minimum wage for women. By an
overwhelming majority the society
adopted the bill. Compulsory arbitra-
tion In labor disputes is the question
to be debated at the next meeting of
the society to be held at 7:30 o'clock
on Tuesday evening, Nov. 28, in the
Adelphi rooms.
Soph Lit Smoker to Be Reld Tomorrow
Prof. J. R. Brumm) of the rhetoric
department and R. W. Collins, '17, will
be the principal speakers at the soph
lit smoker to be held at the Union at
7:30 o'clock tomorrow, night. The
smoker, which was to have been held
last week, was postponed because of
the date conflicting with other campus
events.

roads or there is some unfinished busi-
ness before this country."
In this manner today Warren S.
Stone, head of the Brotherhood of En-
gineers, answered the question of
whether the :,ailroad brotherhood will
call a strike if pending injunctions tie
up the operation of the Adamson eight-
hour law.
Speaking in response to an enthus-
iastic welcome given himself and the
heads of the other three railroad
brotherhoods by the delegates to the
American Federation of Labor conven-
tion, Stone declared "Labor will watch
from the sidelines while the railroads
fight their own government." Efforts
to obtain from the other brotherhood
leaders an expression of their purpose
in the matter were fruitless. Not-
withstanding President Gompers as-
serted from the platform, "We expect
the brotherhoods on the first day of
January to inaugurate the eight-hour
day." ,
Clev eland, Nov. 21.-A judgment for
$375,000 was awarded Henry S. Chap-
man today in his action against the
Peerless Motor Car company, alleging
a breach of war contracts. He set
$800,000 damages. Chapman alleged
that after being given an exclusive
agency to sell Peerless cars in Great
Britain officials of the company went to
London and placed war contracts.
Washington Nov. 21.-The Washing-
ton home of Charles E. Hughes, Re-
publican presidential nominee, was ad-
ieb ised for rent today. Hughes bought
the residence at 2100 16th street
shortly after his appointment to the
United States supreme bench. It was
reported last week that Louis Lombard
of Switzerland had rented the Hughes
home, but the story was afterwards
denied.
Baltiore, Nov. 21.-Bishop A. W.
Wilson, one of the best known clergy-
men of the Methodist Episcopal church,
and a biblical scholar of national
fame, died at his residence here to-
day after a long illness. He was 83
years old, and had filled the office of
bishop since 1882.
Washington, Nov. 21.-President
Wilson will spend but little time in
New York Saturday when he goes
there to attend the Army-Navy game.
Ile will arrive at New York shortly
after 1 o'clock in the afternoon, will
go direct to 'the Polo grounds, and
will return to Washington immediately
after the game.
GIRL S ORDER300,000 SEALS
Rinigs Daughters Co-operate with Y.
W. C. A. in T. B. C. Movement
The Business Girls' club of the Y.
W. C. A. of Ann Arbor have ordered
300,000 Red Cross Christmas seals
from the Michigan Anti-Tuberculosis
%ssociation, whose offices are on the
fourth floor of the natural science
.wilding. This is the biggest order
that the association has received up
:o date except those orders for the
cities of Detroit and Grand Rapids,
who ordered 1,000,000 seals each.
The King's Daughters of the city
are co-operating with the Business
Girls' club in the selling of the seals
around the city. The girls' club has
started a new system in the move-
ment of sending a number bof the seals
by mail to residents of Ann Arbor and
vicinity who are interested in helping
along the anti-tuberculosis movement.
All the seals for the state of Michi-
gan are procured through the associa-
tion here in the city.

!+

The Comedy club will not present
a play this semester. The reason' for
this according to Morrison Wood '17,
president of that organization, is due
to the fact that Professor Strauss,
head of the committee on dramatics,
has found all of the plays submitted
for his approval unsuitable.
"The chief objection," said Wood,
"to the plays submitted, such as 'All-
of-a-Sudden-Peggy,' 'The Cub,' and
'The Importance of Being Earnest,' is
that they are either of insufficient lit-
erary merit to warrant their produc-
tion by the Comedy club or they are
deemed inadvisable." "Trelawnly of
the Wells," by Pinero, was suggested
by the committee, but this is a cos-
tume play and it has been the policy
of the club this year, to discourage
this type of production because the
executive committee does not think
that the campus cares for costumed or
old fashioned plays. Two years ago
"Pomander Walk" a costume play, was
presented and the attendance was only
fair. Last year a modern comedy was
pt on and the attendance was better
than it had been for years, and it was
much better appreciated.
The Comedy club was to have made
its first appearance this year on Dec.
8, but since a play has not yet been
selected it will not be until some time
next semester before it appears.
NOTED IRISH HUMORIST
TO LEFtURE, TONIGHT
"AI3erry Ramble 'Round Ireland" Is
Subject of Seumas MacManus'
Speech in U-Hall
Seumas MacManus, speaking under
the auspices of the Oratorical associa-
tion, will give a lecture recital at 8
o'clock tonight of his own works in
the auditorium of University hall. Mr.
MacManus is one of the best known
of modern Irish humorists, having fre-
quently contributed to practically all
of the Irish and English magazines,
and such periodicals as McClures, Sun-
set, Harper's Weekly and Collier's in
America.
Mr. MacManus will take as his sub-
ject modern Ireland, and will deliver
his lecture, "A Merry Ramble 'Round
Ireland." This is his best known lec-
ture, and the one that he most fre-
quently gives in his tours in the
United States.
Mr. MacManus has appeared in Ann
Arbor once before, coming here under
the direction of the old students lec-
ture association, at which time his lec-
ture created favorable comment.
The humorist is also credited with
being one of the originators of the
Sinn Fein movement which has of late
years so agitated the political system
of Ireland, and which last winter
culminated in the Dublin revolt in
Ireland.
$00,000 Fire at Muncie, Indiana
Muncie, Nov. 21.-Fire yesterday
destroyed the Whiteley Malleable Cast-
ings company's plant. Loss $500,000.

CLUB WANTS MODERN COMEDY

Coach Yost Optimistic for 1917
"Michigan's 1916 football team fought to the last in every game-
it just missed having a wonderful record by six points, three in the
Penn game and three in the Cornell game," said Fielding H. Yost
in a final interview before leaving for his home in Nashville.
"The team this year gained more ground against Cornell than
Harvard did, even though it did lose to the Ithacans, and it was
the only team that rushed over a touchdown on Pennsylvania. Bob
Folwell himself admitted this latter fact after the game last Satur-
day.
"The spirit of the men all year on the squad was fine, Maullie
made a good captain-Douglass and Pontius gave their best efforts at
all times, and everything moved along harmoniously. I admire the
way the men stuck to the trenches when things were breaking
badly."
"In regard to next year's prospects, we will have seven of this
year's team back to make a fine nucleus for the 1917 eleven, and
with the same spirit we should have a winner."
NOVEMBER INNER TO YPONOCESRT
MAKE APEARANCET009YI IVE INITiAL CONCERT

CANADIANS DE[NT
GERMAN DEFENSE
ON SOMME' FRON,
GERMANS ANNOUNCE REDUCTIC
OF FIGHTING IN WEST
OWING TO FOG

TEUTONS OCCUPY CR

Steries, Poems, and Expressions of
Opinions Appear in
Magazine
Copies of tne Inlander for November
go on sale today. The magazine has,
already received favorable comment
through the editorial columns of its
contemporaries.
Consistent with the standard which
the staff of the Inlander has set for
the material to be published is the con-;
tents of the current number. Stories,
poems,tand articleston subjects of in-
terest to the student are to appear.
The content of theamagazine is as,
follows: "Sisters," a short story by
M. Muriel Tyson, grad.; "The Diary,"
short story by S. D. Risley, '19; "July,";
a poem by Sarah Hincks, grad.; "In
the Marshes," a poem by Mr. M. C.'
Wier of the rhetoric faculty; "A Hay-
loft Fable." by "V. E. B."; "The Union
This Year," by Glen M. Coulter. '18L;
"Peanut Fair," by the author of
"Mum's the Word" and an article on
the Martha Cook dormitory.
A number of editorials on varied'
topics of interest to the University are
expressions of opinion on subjects un-
der discussion, and are by no means
a small feature of the publication. The
attractiveness of the Inlander is as-
sured by the cover of light brown
which has been adopted.
The magazine will be put on sale
on the campus and at the book stores
today.
MIIATARY TRAINING CORPS TO
HOLD REGULAR DRILL TONIGHT
In order to preserve a new coat of
paint on the gymnasium floor, the
mi' tary training drill will be held on
the fourth floor of the engineering
building at 7 o'clock tonight for the
last time. It is desirous that all mem-
bers be present as important announce-
ments will be made.
The fact that some of the men have
no uniforms should be no drawback
as one of the companies to be formed
is to be a non-uniformed company.
Freshman Glee Club Holds Rehearsal
Members of the Freshman Glee club
will meet at the School of Music at
7 o'clock tonight for rehearsal. All
men are requested to be present.

harrIson Albert Stevens to be Soloist
Today; Complementary
to Public
The University Symphony orchestra
under the directorship of Mr. Samuel
Pierson Lockwood, will make its first
appearance of the season in Hill audi-
torium, at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon.
Of the 50 members of this orchestra,
32 are university students, the re-
mainder being composed of music
school students and teachers, towns-
peopile, faculty members and several
ut of town people.
The orchestra will present at thisr
ime Cade's Symphony, No. 4, Op. 20,
e i;'Pllet des Sylphes" from Ber-
lioz s "Dmnation of Faust," and Bee-
t hoe n's Concerto, No. 4, G major, Op.
58, t which Mr. Harrison Albert Stev-
enis will be the soloist. Mr. Stevens,
who is faculty member of the piano
,department in the School of Music,
has appeared several times in Hill au-
litorium and his playing has always
.well received.
This concert is one of the regular
faculty series and is complementary to
the general public.
GRADUATE GETS PROMOTION
Wambold Appointed Secretary to Los.
Angeles Chief of Police
Hiram J. Wambold, grad., former
secretary-treasurer of the Press club
of Los Angeles and a well-known lo-
cal newspaper reporter, was appointed
recently as secretary to the chief of
police of Los Angeles, Cal.
Butler's action in naming Mr. Wam-
bold as his confidential adviser' and
secretary was greeted with general
commendation by the members of the,
police department of the city.
For four years Wambold has repre-
ented the Examiner as a police re-
porter. He was formerly professor of
English at the Mercersburg Academy
of Mercersburg, Pa.
Before coming to Los Angeles Wam-
bold was also employed as a secre-
tary to the police department of Buf-
falo, N. Y. While there Wambold first
learned of Chief Butler-then Lieu-
tenant Butler-when the Butler traf-
fic system was installed there.
"Charter Revision" to be Discussed
"Charter Revision" will come up for
a thorough discussion at a joint meet-
ing of the committee on commission
form of government and the board of
directors of the civic association at a
dinner to be held at 6 o'clock tomor-
row night at the Union. The chair-
man of the charter revision committee

Report Blowing Up of Russian Mni-
tion Steamers With Total Dam.
age, of 100,000,000 Rubles
London, Nov. 21.-Successful ad-
vance on a front of 3,500 yards was
announced in a Canadian official state-
ment today. "On Saturday morning,"
the report asserted, "our guns started
a barrage fire against the trenches op-
posite the Canadian forces. Our troops
leaped from the parapet. The Ger-
man guns began a counter barrage fire
which was comparatively weak. Our
forces had fewer casualties than could
be expected.
"We advanced on a front of 3,500
yards to a depth of from 200 to 1,00
yards. Our whole objective was quick-
ly consolidated and held, except for a
short strip where a knoll proved a
machine gun rest. Our troops fell
back and established themslves be-
hind the crest of the knoll.
"We exceeded our objective by 500
yards, capturing a section of the
Grandcourt trench, but we withdrew
because it was too dangerous a salient,
Our losses throughout were compara-
tively light."
Berlin] Nov. 21.-BIg fog in the
Somme district has reduced fighting
activity there.
Berlin, Nov. 21.-Craiovwas was oc-
cupied by German troops at noon to-
day.
Craiovwas is one of the cities in
western Roumanian located in that
section known as Little Wallachia. It
is 120 miles distant from Bucharest,
capital of the 'nation, and until re-
cently has been used as headquarters
by the first Roumanian army. Its oc-
cupancy by the Germans means, it is
believed, practical success of the en-
veloping movement engineered by Gen-
eral Falkenhayn.
It may forcencomplete evacuation of
all of western Roumania by troops of
that nation. If this withdrawal is not
made, the Roumanian forces will face
attacks from two sides, across the
Transylvanian Alps from the north,
and from the new line drawn in the
taking of Craiovwas today.
Berlin, Nov. 21.-Several munitions
steamers were destroyed in recent ex-
plosions at Archangel. Several large
ships were damaged by fire and by
collisions, and damage to buildings
will bring the total loss above 100,-
000,000 rubles, according to Swedish
reports. War Minister Shumayene
called the explosion "one of Russia's
worst defeats," according to these dis-
patches.
Paris, Nov. 21.-The chamber of
deputies held a secret session this'
afternoon presumably to discuss eco-
nomic and military problems of the
war.
Berlin, Nov. 21.-Vienna this after-
noon reported that the condition of
Emperor Franz Josef was worse. His
temperature increased this afternoon.
Ohio Club to Hold Meeting Tonight
The first meeting of the Ohio club,
which was organized late last year,
will be held at the Union at 7 o'clock
tonight. The election of officers and
discussion of plans for the year will
take place at this meeting. Allmem-
bers of the organization are urged to
be present.

FOOTBALL SMOKER
WEINBER~r COLISEUM
25c TICKETS AT UNION 25c
SAT. NOV. 25 SAT*
FRIAY

SAVE
C H RST

FRIDAY
F O R
mAS

DECE"BER,
T H E
C O

15

CERT

I

GLEE AND

BY T H E
MANDOLIN

CLUB

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