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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 21, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4E MICHIGAN E

[LY

LK-OVER'S for WOMEN -i

1.. .1

LYNDON

719 N. Vimivesaty

Styles in demand for Winter Tramping

I

THE ONE, PHOTOGRAPHER
Who delivers the Goods and has
been delivering them for 12 years
right here among Michigan Students

The
E ncyclopaedia
Britannica

s popular
es in B
skin an
ber or le
Priced $

r Pattern Pictured --
lack and Brown 1 /
d blackkid skin.
.ather soles.o
$4.50 to $7.00
ARRIVED
Silver Pumps
H OFFSTETTER'S

Kodaks
Supplies

Guaranteed
Amatear-
Ffndshhng

I

TUST
w lot of

Walk - Over Boot Shop
115 S. Main St.

E.NIORSf
Sit Early For Your "MICHIGANENSIAN" ,
PICTURE AT
619 E. Liberty St.
Ann Arbor. - - Mich.
Perfect Portraitures
Unsurpassed Accomodations for
Group Photographs.
oAmateur rk Handled in a Pro-
A4 Bfessional Way.
MAIN STUDIOS 1$46-48 Broadway.New York, N. Y.

E. Huron St.

WARD'S

118 E. Huron St.

assy-Kut-Klothes Shop says-:
You can afford to wear one of our Suits or Overcoats for
Turkey Day - WHY?
Because he saves you $ro.oo.

7.00 Up

MADE-TO-MEASURE

$17.00 Up

ITY NEWS
reases in salaries were granted
members of the fire and police
tments at the regular meeting of
>mmon council last night. Alder-
E. B. Manwaring, of the Fifth
objected that the fire depart-
was not all that it could be, that
en do not drill enough. How-
he voted for the increase "under
skating rinks at least will be
ructed by the city during the win-
300 having been appropriated for
urpose. The use of Palmer field
ae of the rinks was granted by
niversity.
John A. Wessinger presented a
>r $250 for services rendered dur-
he health survey. This was de-
by the council on the ground that
.ty charter places a fixed limit to
alary of the health officer.
Ann Arbor Federation of Char-
received its annual appropria-
f $200. A. R. Cole was appointed
ambership in the board of public

to fill the unexpired
n P. James.

term ofI

VHAT'S GOING ON

Today.
o'clock-Soph engineer
Union.

ITI PRAISE CTION
TO CONTROL SUPPLIES
Say That Measure Advances Cause of
Socialism in Eng-
land
London, Nov. 20.-No other govern-
ment action in Great Britain during
the war has commanded such immedi-
ate and almost unanimous support as
has the decision to control food sup-
plies and prices. Virtually the entire
press welcomes the scheme.
The Statist points out that the meas-
ure advances socialism immensely. The
public appears just to have awakened
to the fact that a majority of the popu-
lation is living lavishly as in pre-war
days.
Arrangements already are being
made between the board of trade and
the board of agriculture for controlling
the prices of stocks. The distribution
of the most important commodities-
corn, meat, and potatoes-is already
partly regulated, as also is that of
sugar. The rationing of the population
on the German system appears as yet
improbable.
Attack Luxurious Menus.
One of the troublesome features of
the situation is how to equalize mat-
ters between the rich and the poor.
On the theory of "equality of sacrifice
for all," which is a popular war watch-
ward, the newspapers are making a
sensation of luxurious menus in fash-
ionable restaurants and homes. The
limitation of restaurant meals to three
courses is to be discussed by the con-
ferees of Walter Runciman, president
of the board of trade, with hotel and
restaurant managers on Wednesday to
devise economy, but the restaurants in
the cities really are a small factor in
the general problem.
To the casual observer there are no
signs of food shortage. It still is pos-
sible to get a good dinner or lunch in
London cheaper than it could be ob-
tained in New York before the war.
Lunch Four Shillings.
A prosperous stock broker lunches
well for three or four shilling and six
pence. A course dinner at a good hotel
costs five or six shillings. The poorer
housekeepers who buy in small quan-
tities feel the pinch, since the general
retail prices average nearly 70 per
cent higher.
In the meantime "the, workman's
beer" remains lmost sacred. Notice
has been given by a small group of
members of the house of commons that
they will press for prohibition of the
manufacture of alcoholic beverages,
but this has excited no popular re-
sponse.
A wise head wears a guaranteed hat,
in a certified style. See Davis at 119
Main. 21&24

TrenchNagazine
is Full of Humor
Verses of Humor and Pathos Found
in Periodical Written by
British Troops
The Listening Post, a bi-monthly
periodical, written edited, and printed
in the zone of shell fire, "somewhere
in France," by the British expedition-
ary force, has made its appearance
around the campus.
Although carefully censored by the
chief censor of the first Canadian di-
vision, there is plenty of trench humor
in it, and the evident disposition of
the censor to indulge in a little laxity
is shown by the following choice piece
of verse that w'as allowed to pass:
Darn the kaiser! Darn the Huns!
Darn the man who invented guns.
Darn the army! Darn the war!
Oh, what a jolly lot of fools we are.
Underneath the verse is the com-
ment: "Mr. Watson said that all of
the politics of the house of commons
could not give a finer summing up of
the situation."
Under the heading, "War Books," is
listed the literary production entitled:
"The Music of War," by Running
Harder Savesus, the great American
war correspondent.
"Every soldier should possess a copy
of this useful book, written by an ex-
pert. Its vivid description of the dif-
ferent sounds made by bullets and
other projectiles during their penetra-
tion of the air, would make it quite
unnecessary for civilians with 'con-
scientious objection' visiting the bat-
tle area in order to experience all
nerve throbs of battle. Old veterans
who have read his book have in-
stinctively thrown themselves pros-
trate on the ground in order to avoid
being hit--no greater commendation
could be given than this."
Hill 603, made memorable by the loss
of many lives and the brave stand of
the 1st division, is commemorated by
the following bit of sentiment:
There's a wooded hill in Flankers
Pitted with shot and shell, and
With a line of disused dug-outs 'neath
the crest;
There's a group of wooden crosses,
Showing white among the trees,
Where the 1st division's heroes lie at
rest.
There's a wooded hill in Flanders,
Where the trees are fallig fast,
With the trunks and branches smashed
by shot and shell;
But the little group of crosses
Is growing more and more,
Where we've buried men we knew and
loved so well.
Those broken trees that fall there,
Lie unheeded on the ground,
With noneto care or wonder how they
fell.
But those little wooden crosses,
Are a living memory
To the men whose deed we'll never
cease to tell.
Plan Christmas for Border Troops
Washington, Nov. 20.-A nation-wide
collection of Christmas boxes for the
50 000 regular soldiers in Mexico and
along the border was announced by
Red Cross headquarters here in let-
ters to all its 250 chapters in the
United States.
Office Girls to Have Dress Party
All the girls who are working in the
campus offices will give a fancy dress
party tonight at the home of Miss
Chapin, of Secretary Smith's office.
Each group from different departments

of the University will give a stunt or
play.
President to See Army-Navy Game
Washington Nov. 20.-The President
and Mrs. Wilson will attend the Army-
Navy football game at New York Sat-
urday. With the presidential family
will be Secretaries Baker, Daniels
and Lansing, provided no matters of
state arise to prevent the trip.
Watch for the grand opening of Ann
Arbor's Finest Floral Shop. Nickels
Arcade. 3-tf
Guess who sells haberdashery at 119
Main. 21&24
Use The Michigan Daily Want Ads
for results.

The Passing Show of 1916

-

ARCADE
Shows at 3:oo; 6:30; 8:00; 9:30
roc Unless Otherwise Specified.
Phone 2q6-M.
Fri.-17-Viola Dana in "The Gates of
FEden"; D~rew Comedy'.
Sat.-i8 Kathleen Williams in"The',Ne er-
Do-Well," 15c. Children's Matinee,2
p. m.; "Chip's Carmen", "A Toyland
Villain", "The Henanpup."
Mon.-Tue.-20-21- Francis X. Bushman
and Beverly Bayne in "Romeo and
.juliet." 250.

(Handy Volume Issue)
NOW ON DISPLAY HERE
Come in and Browse around

Mat. Wed.
Fri. id Sat.
DETROIT

I

We make hats
We sell hats at retail
We carry a big stock
We have the latest all the time
We shape hats to fit the head
We clean and reblock hats

Week of
Nov. 20

Sheehan & CO.

FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Next to the Delta
Cor. Packard and State

MAJE STIC
3- 7:30 - 9:30
Now Showing
POLLARD OPERA CO.
"THE DOGWATCH"
BRADY & MAHONEY
"The Fireman & His Chief"
THE DOHERTY'S
JUST NONSENSE
OSCAR STARR
PHYSICAL CULTURIST
SPECIAL FEATURE
GREW, PAITES & CO.
"SOLITAIRE"
CHARLES MORGAN JR. PLEASED
WITH BOOK FOR 1917 OPERA
Charles Morgan, Jr., of Philadelphia,
director of the Michigan Union opera,
came to Ann Arbor Saturday for the
Pennsylvania game and remained un-
til Sunday afternoon to read the book
for the 1917 opera with the author and
the committee in charge. Outside of
a few minor changes Mr. Morgan ex-
pressed himself as highly pleased with
the book. He will return in February
to take active charge at rehearsals.
Russian Book Collection Displayed
A collection of Rusian books and
portraits of Russian authors, has been
selected by Prof. Clarence Meader, of
the language department, and is now
on exhibition in the east corridor of
the Library.
There are in the collection several
scenes from Chekov's "Cherry Blos-
som's which was played in the Im-
perial theater, in Petrograd, portraits
of Tolstoi, Dostoevski, Gogol, and
books by Maxim Gorky.

Vienna, Nov. 20.-Count Adam
Tarnowski von Tarnow, the new Aus-
tro-Hungarian ambassador to the
United States, will sail for America
Dec. 16, with a retinue of 10 persons.
The countess will be among those ac-
companying the ambassador.
The first date, Nov. 19, fixed for the
count's departure, was unavailable, be-
cause the safe conduct obtained for
him through the American government
read for three persons, thus necessitat-
ing a change.
Countess Tarnowski has arrived in
Vienna from Sofia.
Advocates Dramatics for Universities
Ithaca, N. Y., Nov. 20.-"Dramatics
should be given a much higher place
in the list of academics than in the
list of outside activities," says Stew-'
art Walker, orgainator of the Port-
manteau theater. "Dramatics furnish
education to the participant both in
literature and in self-control. and
might well be included in the college
curriculum. The drama as enacted by
the under graduate is a most fertile
source of talent and imagination for
the professional and it often happens
that by this means members of the
cast become professionals of the high-
est type."
Postal Saving Banks Make Gains
Washington, Nov. 20.-Deposits in
postal saving banks continue to show
record-breaking gains. The increase'
for October was $4 700,000, or twice
that for October, 1915. In the four
months since July 1 the deposits have
increased more than $17,000,000, al-
most as much as for the entire year
ended June 30, 1916. On Oct. 31 postal
savings depositors numbered 650,000
and had $104,200,000 to their credit.
The finest' Floral Shop in the city
will open soon in the Nickels Arcade,j
State Street. 3-ti
If you must study, be comfortable
in a Davis bathrobe and slippers to
match. Davis at 119 Main. 21&24

IIERRICK WANTS BIG FUND
FOR RELIEF IN EUROPE
Urges Philanthropists to Give Billon
Dollars to Suffering
Nations
Philadelphia, Nov. 20.-The system-
atic organization of all the philan-
thropic forces of the United Statesato
raise a fund of a billon dollars under
governmental supervision for the relief
of the sufferers in all the warring na-
tions of Europe was advocated by.-
Myron T. Herrick, former ambassador
to France, in an address delivered here
at the ihome of E. T. Stotesbury. His
audience included about 200 men and
women, whose combined wealth is said
to run into the hundreds of millions..
Motion pictures showing the work of
the ambulance field service and the
American aviators in France were
shown.
After describing the need for relief
in war-stricken Europe, Mr. Herrick
said:
The situation can be adequately met
only by the systematic organization of
all the philanthropic forces of the
United States. A strong central au-
thority is needed such as only the gov-
ernment can give. I wish that the
prQsident had seen fit-and it is not
yet too late-to appoint a large num-
ber of the leading men of the country
as a committee to take charge of the
whole undertaking; to co-ordinate all
kinds of relief work, receiving the aid
of federal and state, governments, even
to the extent of appropriations. Were!
we to set the mark at a billion dollars
that would be little enough to meet.
the extraordinary demands of this
worst calamity that the world has ever
known.
"It is often said that the United
States will have no friends when this
war ends, but were we to create this
gigantic charity to labor in every one
of the belligerent countries for the re-
lief of the wounded and destitute, its
beneficent work would far overshadow
all the animosities which now vex us."

'I

4

C. W. CRAHAM, Mngr.

Orpheum TheatreI
Matinees, 2:00-3 :30, Evening, 6:45,
8:15, 9:30.z
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Tues.-21- Mae Marsh in "The Little
Liar." Also Triangle Comedy, Claire
Anderson in "She Loved a Sailor."
Lve I~c.
wedI.-22- Marguerite Clark in "Still
Waters." Rebooked.
T'lur.- Fri.-23-24- Pauline Frederick in
"Ashes of Embers." Also Bray Car-
tooWne.
What we

Whitney Theatre
T 0 N I G H T
ARTHUR HAMMERSThEN
OFFERS THE BRILLIANT AND SPARK-GN SUCCESS
A MUSICAL PLAY
OF INFINITE CHARM
BY HAU*RBACH AND FRIML
I,ATflON OF Hmom JINKS "AN'D "TtlE iIREPL
ONE YEAR AT Tlt LYRlC~so 44T" ST. THEATRES. NEW.YORK(
Musical Gems of Haunting Sweetness
"Racketty Coo," "In Vienna," "In A
Hurry," "One Who Will Understand,"
"Katinka," "Your Photo," "I Can Tell
By The Way YVou Dance Dear," "I Want
All The World To Know," "Skidiskis-
catch," "I Want To Marry A Male
Quartette," "The Weekly Wedding."
Prices: $2.00, 1.50, 1.00, 75c, 'O5c
Seat Sale MONDAY, NOV.20
AUSTRIAN MINISTER TO SAIL
FOR UNITED STATES DEC. 16

K FRIDAY
NOV. 24
Charles Frohman
1 PRESENTS
Rose
Stahl
in the NEW
American Comedy
OUR MRS. Mc OHESNEY
A Dramatization of Edna Far-
ber's Emma McChesney
Stories
By Arrangement with JOSEPH BROOKS
Seat Sale WEDNESDAY
PRICES: 50, 75c $1, 1.50, 2

smokerI

7:30 o'clock-Adelphi society meets
in the Adelphi rooms.
7:30 o'clock-Meeting of the Can-
adian club at the Union.
7:30 o'clock-Meeting of the Tryads
in the library of the old engineering
building.
Tomorrow.
7 o'clock-Try outs for the All-
Fresh Glee club at the School of Mu-
sic.
8 o'clock-Seumas Mac Manus lec-
tures in the auditorium of U-hall.
E. L. Demmond Speaks to Foresters
E. L. Demmond, grad., spoke to the
members of the forestry class yester-
day morning. He is at present engag-
ed with the Goodyear Rubber company
in Akron, Ohio, but will leave short-
ly to take charge of a rubber planta-
tion in the island of Samatra, East
Indies. He returned to his home in
Akron yesterday afternoon.
No Race Suicide for State of Michigan
Lansing. Mich., Nov. 20.-Births in
Michigan outnumbered deaths during
October better than two to one, accord-
ing to the monthly mortality report of
the secretary of state. There were
3,543 deaths and 6,554 births. The
death rate was 13.2 per 1,000 estimated
population and the birth rate 25.0.
Leave your film at the Delta. 24

The Michigan Daily for service.

o
s

..

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AT tIHE ONLY"
STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
You can have your Films developed for
10C
Find everything A student needs
1111 So Univ. We deliver the goods 1160-R

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