100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 18, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r

THE WEATHER
FOR ANN ARBOR-
SATURDAY-PROBABLY SNOW
FLURiES

BGIf n

UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AN) NIIU 'ERVI{.E
THlE ONLY 3lORNN PAPE R IN
ANN ARBOR

L

VOL. XXVI. No. 41. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENT'

PENNSY DEFIED AT
816 PEP MEETING
O-N EYE Of BATTLE

ALUMNI RETURN IN FORCE
CHEER VARSITY ON TO
VICTORY

TO

SING'LAUDES ATQUE CARMINA'
Speakers Express Confidence in Team;
Yost and Tuthill Address
Audience
Hill auditorium, crowded from main
floor to second balcony,, last night
echoed and re-echoed to the defening
cheers which signalized the monster
mass meeting held on the eve of the
battle with Pennsylvania. The Varsity
band aided in producing the pep on the
part of the audience which was at all
times in evidence. Harold O'Brien,
'17, of the Varsity track team, officiated
as chairman.
The first speaker on the program,
Shirley W. Smith, secretary of the
University, opened fire with a number
of witty stories directly applicable to
today's game, and rehearsed the past
performances of the team which in-
dicated a decisive victory over the
Quaker rivals.
Ed Shields. ex-varsity baseball
player, next occupied the platform,
telling the team what was expected of
them, as well as assuring the student
body that their hearty support upon
Ferry field would not be amiss, declar-
ing that the stands play almost as
great a part in the winning of the
game as the gridiron warriors them-
selves.
Previous Victory Described.
"Vic" Pattengill vividly described
the defeat of the Philadelphians at the
hands of the 1909 squad that repre-
sented the Maize and Blue. He spoke
of the early-season defeats that had
rendered victory hopeless, and how
from the first whistle until the last, the
fighting spirit of Michigaw battled
against all odds and succeeded in
bringing back a 12 to 6 score in their
favor. Declaring that he was about
to satisfy an old longing to lead a lo-
comotive, the alumnus assumed the
role of cheer leader, raising the en-

File Suit Against
f.ovie ' Concerns
Damages Amounting to $18,000,000
Asked by "Independents" Under
Sherman Anti-Trust Law
New York, Nov. 17.-Suits were filed
this afternoon for damages aggregat-
ing $18,000,000 under the Sherman
anti-trust law against the Motion Pic-
tures Patents company and the Gen-
eral Film company and other corpora-
tions and individuals. The petitioners
included a group of the so-called in-
dependents in the motion picture field.
A petition filed in the United States
district court charged illegal restraint
in the exhibition of motion pictures
films. Among the independents who
are plaintiffs in the suit and the
amounts of damages asked are: Miles
Brothers, Inc., $2,325,000; Chicago
Film exchange, $1,487,400; George
Melies company, $908,000; Eugene
Klein, $950,000; Colorado Film ex-
change. $500,000; Sanders' Film ex-
change, $247,500; Samuel Schiller,
$149,000.
St. Paul, Nov. 17.-Slight changes in
Hennepin county, Minnesota, figures
late this afternoon cut the Hughes
lead to 439, upon the face of United
Press figures.
Washington, Nov. 17.-Secretary of
State Lansing this afternoon author-
ized a denial of reports that depart-
ment officials have received word of
Germany's intention to renew its sub-
marine warfare on its former scale.
Georgetown, 0., Nov. 17.-Because
he toes out conspicuously when he
walks, Leonard Sanders may be con-
victed as a murderer of Henry Wahl
here last June. Charles Wahl, brother
of the murdered man, today testified
that footprints found near the scene
ot the murder were made by a man
who toed out and he pointed to this
characteristic in Sanders. .
HOLD DEBATE TRY-OUTS TODAY
Elimination Contests Arranged for 24
Society Men
Twenty-four men will try out this
morning in the first elimination held
since the debating society contests,
for the choosing of 18 men who will
contend further for places on the two
teams that will debate in the Central
league this year. The try-outs will
take place at 8 o'clock this morning
in room 302 M. H. and each speaker
will be given eight minutes. The men
will speak in alphabetical order, the,
list being as follows:
W. T. Adams, '17, A. P. Bogue, '18L,
R. M. Carson, '17, G. C. Claassen, '17L,
G. W. Hulbert, '17. C. E. Hutton, '17,
S. L. Kennedy, '18, A. R. Levine, '19L,
L. W. Lisle, '17L, H. F. Massnick, '18,
J. Matson, '19L, H. L. McCarthy, '17L,
H. A. McCrimmon, '18L, R. A. Mc-
Ginnis, '17L, C. W. Miller, '19, A. J.
Rogoski, '18L, T. M. Rudesill, '19L, W.
P. Sandford, '19, J. R. Simpson, '18, H.
B. Teegarden, '17, I. S. Toplon, '19L,
W. W. Vsscher, '18L, R. W. Ward, '18,
and M. W. Welch, '17.
Pennsy Suspends for Send-Off
Philadelphia, 17.-Classes in
the University of ennsylvania were
suspended for two hours Thursday
morning to allow all students a chance
to give the football team a big send-off
for the Michigan game.,

WIN, LosE, OR TIE,
CAMPUS TO JOIN
IN CELEBRATION
TEAM, BAND, AND ST)ENTS TO
BE ON HAND FOR CERE-
MONIE S
MEET TONIGHT,_71:5 O"CLOCK
High School Football Field and Wein-
berg's Coliseii to Be Scenes
of Action
Whether Michigan wins, loses, or
ties in the game against Pennsylvania
this afternoon, a celebration will be
held tonight on the field opposite Wein-
berg's coliseum. The student body
and the varsity band will assemble in
front of University hall at 7:15 o'clock.
A big lumber wagon drawn by the
students will convey the team to the
scene of the revelry. Leaving the
campus the crowd will snake dance
down State street to the corner of lill
and State streets. Turning to the
right they will proceed along Hill to
the high school football field opposite
Weinburg's.
Preparations have been made for a
big bonfire on the field which, accord-
ing to Reginald Jeavons, '19, chairman
of the fire committee, will rival those
of former cap nights. The students
will snake dance around the fire draw-
ing the team on their wagon. Bob
(Continued on Page Six.)
DA1IYEXTRA T AEAR
DIHRTYFTER GAE
Michigan-Pennsylvania Game Will Be
Covered Play by Play in
Special Issue ,
It will require just five minutes after
the close of the Michigan-Pennsylvania
football game this afternoon to place
the green extra of The Michigan Daily
on sale on the streets. Newsboys will
meet the crowd as they come from
Ferry field.
The extra will contain an exact ac-
count of the game paly by play sent
by a special wire direct from, the field
to The Daily office. In addition to
this, the extra will contain numerous
other features. There will be inter-
views with prominent men, including
Yost and Folwell, the head coaches of
the two teams, and with Hughitt,
former Michigan football star.
Cuts of the Michigan and Pennsyl-
vania teams will also be in the extra.
There will be a story concerning pros-
pects for Walter Camp's All-American
eleven to. be found in the lineup of
the two teams.
An article of who's who at Michi-
gan will be included and also a fea-
ture on the members of the All-Fresh
squad who will be looked to as candi-
dates for the positions on next year's
Varsity left vacant by football gradu-
ates of next spring.
The M. A. C. extra eclipsed all
former records for speed, but every
effort is being made to do even better
with today's extra. A competent staff
will handle the edition and indications
point to a realization of their hopes.

0
U'

Dunne .........171
Wieman ........185
Gracey .........205
Niemann .......161
Rehor ..........251
Weske..........185
Peach ..........182
Sparks .........157
Maulbetsch .....155
Raymond .......172
Smith ..........185

21
19
25
22
22
22
21
19
23
22
21

6-
6-2
6-
5-11
6-
6-
5-10
5-10
5-6
5-11
6-

0
0

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

c,
0
3
3
3
3
1
1
2
3
2
1
2

d-)
5-9
5-11
6-
5-11
5-11
5-11
5-9
5-8
5-11
5-10
5-10

Line-Up Statistics on Game

MICHIGAN

21 152....... Urquhart
22 198....... Mathews
21 210........ Henning
22 174.......... Wray
20 175....... Wirkman
22 210...........Little
23 170.......... Miller
21 157..........Bell
23 190.....,......Derr
20 162.......... Light
21 160.......... Berry
Michigan Pennsylvania

PENNSYLVANIA

GONlTES O YA
BO IT TH M )S AN \ CO ES SURE
OF VICTORY IN 'T1IS AFT-
T ERNOON'S C LASil
FIELD IS1 IN FAIR C)N I TIDN
Ele ens Given Liglht Workouts Yes-
terday Afternoon; Pemisy Irac-
tices at Detr oit Country Club
* Michigan Pennsy *
* 1899 .............. 10 11 *
* 1906 .............. .0 17 *
1907 .............. .0 6 *
* 1908............... 0 29 *
* 19t 1Aay d *

Total weight.................................. 2,009
Average weight...........................182.7
Line average................191.4
Backfield average .........................167.2

1,958
178
184.2
167.2

i

BEGIN PROBE OF"
U-BOATCOLLISION
I. S. Inspector to Inquire Into Cause
of Death of Five Following
Ramming of Convoy
STRANGE VESSEL OFF COAST
New London, Nov. 17.--Official in-
vestigation into the collision early to-
day between the giant subsea freighter
Deutschland and her convoy, the tug
Scott< Jr., which cost the lives of five
members of the Scott's crew, was
started at 3 o'clock this afternoon by
William E. Whithey, United States
steamship inspector, and Harris Ran-
kin, his assistant.

GERMANS CHECK
BRITISH FORCES
French Allied Army Continues to Ad-
vance Toward Fortress
of Monastir
ROUMANIANS HOLD ALL FRONTS
London, Nov. 17.-Admission that
furious counter attacks by the Ger-
mans had forced the British troops to
relinquish part of the territory east
of Butte Warlencourt which had been
won from the Teutons Tuesday, came
from General Haig this afternoon in a
report to the British war office.
Earlier in the day the British con-
mander had reported a further slight
advance for the allies on the northern
bank of the Ancre. From Paris today

*
*
*
*
*
*
*

1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915

0
11
21
13
34
0

0t
9
27
0
3
0

*
*
*
*
*
*i

Totals ....:.......101

108 *

Captain Koenig and other officers came the official announcement of
comparative quiet along the Somme
of the Deutschland were on hand to front. The French war office, how-
give their official version of the ac- ever, details considerable aerial ac-
cident. It was still uncertain tonight tivity in various sectors.
just how seriously the submersible News of continued successes for the
had been damaged by the crash, but French-Russian-Italian-Serbian forces
it was generally believed that she in their Macedonian offensive brought1
could* be put in shape to make an- joy to London this afternoon. The fall
other dash for sea within a few days. of Monastir within three days was
A report this afternoon from Plum predicted by the military critics. Rou-
island that a strange fighting subma- manians are maintaining their posi-
rine with a gun .mounted on her deck tions on all fronts.
had been sighted near Bartlett's reef The announcement, however, told of
on Long Island Sound created excite- "violent enemy attacks" implicating
ment here. It was generally thought the Teutonic drive against Roumania
in marine circles that the craft was continues. Berlin reported a vigorous
the war, submersible which was re- artillery duel in progress on the
ported enroute to the American coast Somme front and also detailed the
to convoy the Deutschland past the defeat of British infantry attacks in
allies' cruiser blockade in the Atlantic. Beaucourt.

thusiasm to a still greater
In answer to the cries{

pitch.
of "Yost!

Yost!" the coach mounted to the plat-
form. "I can not remember," said he,
"when I have had a better squad of
men in training. I am told Coach Fol-
well has assured the Pennsylvanians
that he will 'bring home the bacon'
tomorrow, but he will have some time
catching the pig."
Following the singing of "The Yel-
low and Blue," Tommy Hughitt, late
of the Varsity squad, Captain Maul-
betsch, and Trainer Tuthill responded
to repeated calls, each making a num-
ber of pertinent remarks regarding the
game, and assuring the team that the
student body was ever behind it.
Slides showing members of the team
were thrown upon the screen, each
picture being loudly cheered by the
audience led by Bob Bennett. During
the program, the band rendered a
number of the old Michigan war songs,
while the Glee club assisted in the re-
vival of "Laudes Atoue Carmina," ac-.
companied by the audience.
Celebrate on Ferry Field.
Amidst the cheering of the students
and the music of the band, about 500
Michigan rooters started from Uni-
versity hall yesterday afternoon at 4
o'clock and marched down State street
to Ferry field where the twilight pep
fest was staged, By the time the
crowd had reached the field the num-
ber had swelled to at least a hundred
more, all walking four abreast, sing-
ing and cheering.
Upon reaching the field the band
struck up the "Victors" and marched
to the north side of the gridiron. The
(Continued on Page Six.)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Wolverine opposes Quaker on the
gridiron this afternoon for the twelfth
time since 1899. Since 1906 yearly
games have been the habit of the two
institutions. In these Penn has been
returned the victor on five occasions,
Michigan on four. Two contests were
scoreless ties.
Both camps last night breathed con-
fidence of the outcome. Both coaches
expressed beliefs of victory.
Michigan's sundown practice of the
year was a light one. S'gnals, kicking
and passing comprised the entirety of
short workouts for the Yostmen. Fol-
well's men in Detroit held forth at the
Country club, and the same regard for
none of the strenuosities prevailed.
The Penn team will remain in De-
troit this morning, arri,,ing at the
scene of battle just before the game
is called.
Pennsy Lineup Uncertain.
Folwell last night had not given out
the exact lineup which will represent
the invaders in the big intersectional
battle. It is believed that the new
coach will use Berry, Light, Derr, and
Bell as his backfield, although eleventh
hour shifts are not unexpected. Wirk-
man is believed to,have the call over
Estevaag as left guard for the Broth-
erly Love boys. If Berry starts he
will do the punting for Folwell's
huskies.
Sparks will probably divide a portion
of the punting with Dianne. The Wol-
verine advantage inrthis nay be real-
ized, for Sparks from the booter's
position can threaten the Quakers with
a punt, a pass, or an attempted gain
in lugging the leather himself.
Early in the week after the snow
had covered the field, it was feared
that the going for the big game would
be unsteady. Such would have seri-
ously interferred with the passing
game and the open work of the Wol-
verines. The weather of the past two
days has softened the gridiron and
from appearances the field will be
springy, but not slippery.
Michigan Outweighs Opponents.
In weights the Yostmen have a small
margin upon the contenders from the
east, but not enough to make the dif-
ference shift the balance of the game
in favor of the home, team.
The largest crowd which ever
marched through Ferry field gates will
see the game, according to the athletic
association. Director of Athletics
Bartelme predicts that 28,000 people
will crowd through the turnstiles for
the final appearance of Captain Maul-
betsch in a Wolverine moleskin. The
largest previous crowd was at the
Minnesota-Michigan contest in 1910. It
numbered 25,000.

ALCHEMISTS, CHEMICAL HONOR
SOCIETY, INITIATES EIGHT MEN
Alchemists, honorary chemical so-
ciety initiated the following Thurs-
day: W. F. Wild, '18, H. M. Cheery,
'18E, A. A. Scholl, '17, R. A. Hayward,
'17E, S. G. Pratt, '18E, C. B. Lewis,
'18E, I. S. Ellison, '18E, R. C. German-
son, '18E.
Speeches were given by Professors
A. H. White and H. H. Willard, and
C. E. Hart, '17E, and A. A. Scholl, '17.
W. Lee. Watson; '17E, presided as
toastmaster at the banquet held at
Catalpa inn.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *
*

*
*

*
*
*
*
*
*
*

ANTE-MORTEM PREDIC- *1
TIONS OF THE COACHES *

Coach Folwell-We expect to
bring home the bacon.
Coach Yost-It's going to be
some chase for the pig.

*
*
*
*
*

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Read a full account of the game,
play by play, in the Green Pennsy Ex-
tra, on the streets immediately after
the game.

________________U 2

Don't Go to the Game Without the
PENNSY PROGRAM
Seventy-eight pictures. Statisticts on both squads with
numbers. Diagrams of the two line-ups. "Two beauti-
ful Verses" by Ring Lardner. "Laudes Atque Carmina".
Double page picture of the team.
LIMITED EDITION - THEY'RE GOING FAST
TWENTY-FIVE CENTS

R *1

, A

GREEN
CR EN

TODAY
PENNS-EXTRA

GsR:N
GR
L E
.

On the Streets Immediately Alter the Game

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan