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November 17, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SNOW

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FLURIES

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UNITED PRESS WIL
DAY AND NIMT SERVICI
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER
ANN ARBOR

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XXVII. No. 40.

0

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1916.

PRICE FIVE-.C

PRICE FIVE.(

; 1 E r

UP
'RANGO-RUSSIANS
FOUR MILES FROM
MOASTIR WA
'OWERFUL SERBIAN FORTRESS
THREATENED BY
ALLIES

Germans Tell of
Rowanmore Tilt

FRENCH FORCE GERMANS BACK
Petrograd Reports Continued Retreat
of Mackensen's forces on
Dobrudja Front
London, Nov. 16.-Franco-Russian
troops have hurled back German de-
fenses around Monastir, and are now
but a bare four miles from that im-
portant fortress, according to recent
dispatbhes. The Bulgarian official
statements bear this out by admitting
a retreat along the Macedonian front'
northward towards the fort. The re-
port continues:
"Throughout the day our Monastir
plain positions were fiercely bombard-
ed. The enemy's violent attack failed
around the bend of the Cer na river.
We retired northwards toward Tepaw-
izh and Vigol."

Papers State Submarine Fired Warn-
ing to Which Ship Paid No Heed;
No Shots at Life Boats
Berlin, Nov. 16.-A report on the
sinking of the steamer Rowanmore
with 'several Americans as members
of her crew made public today denies
that the German submarine fired on
life boats. As published in German
newspapers the details of the incident
were:
When sighted the Rowanmore was
ordered to stop, which order she did
not heed. The submarine fired a warn-
ing shot. The British vessel, which
flew no flag, turned, tried to escape,
and at the same time wirelessed her
position and her danger. The subma-
rine then started shelling the yessel.
After 25 minutes the Rowanmore
stopped, and the boats were lowered,
whereupon the shelling ceased, al-
though no distinct signals were made
by the Rowanmore.

PLAN CELEBRATION
AFTER PENN CAME
Student Council Discusses Advisability
of Holding Blow-Out in
Case of Victory
URGES MEN TO WEAR TOQUES
At a meeting of the student council
last night plans were discussed for
the holding of a huge celebration after
the Pennsylvania game tomorrow night
in the event of a Michigan victory. No

TWILIGHT YELL FEST
WHEN-4:05 O'CLOCK.
WHERE-MEET IN FRONT OF
U-HALL.
WHO-THE BAND, THE CHEER
LEADER, THE STUDENT BODY.

PENN MASS MEETING
WHEN-7:30 O'CLOCK.
WHERE-HILL AUDITORIUM.
WHO-VIC PATTENGILL, SHIR-
LEY SMITH, THE STUDENT
BODY, THE BAND, THE CHEER

Tonight 's the Night

LAST PEP MEETING
HELL T O RIUTl i
YELLS, SO-NS, AND SPEECHES T4
OF BATTL

Milwaukee, Nov.i6.-Attorney Henry
Killilea representing the Chicago, Mil-
waukee and St. Paul railroad, this aft-
ernoon filed with the United States
district court here a petition for an in-
junction to restrain railroad employ-
ces from suing for wages under the
Adamson law.

definite decision was reached as to
the plan to be carried out, but a cele-
bration will unquestionably be held,
the full details of which will appear
in tomorrow's Daily.
In order to uphold and further one
of Michigan's worth-while traditions,
the traditions committee of the council
urges every senior, junior, sophomore,
and freshman on the campus to wear
the official toque of his class.
The council has investigated the ad-
visability of holding student dances in
Barbour gymnasium, and beginning
with a week from tomorrow Saturday
night dances will probably be given
there. A new tug-of-war rope to re-
place the old one which was cut up
last year will be bought in the near
future. The expense of the rope will
be met by the present sophomore and
junior classes on the campus.
en ns Issue of
the Gargoyle Out
2,000 Copies Printed in Order to Sup-
ply Increased Demand for
This Number

LEADER.
WHY-TO HELP MICHIGAN WIN. WHY-TO HELP MICHIGAN WIN.
Michigan students will have their last opportunity today to lend sup-
port to their football team before It goes on the field in the final game
of the season.- The presence of every loyal Michigan man is needed to
imake the twilight yell fest this afternoon and the mass meeting tonight
successful. It is the football team that has to fight the battle tomor-
row. If the players can realize the support they have from the students,
it will help them to win. Come out and show them that the student body
is behind the team to a man.

TO PETITION REGENTS
FOR OFFICERS' CORPS

ED SHIELDS, '94, TO GIVE Ti

Attempt to
Under

Establish Military Unit'
Provisions of De-
fense Act

k' r'

Mona'stir, the important fortress in
he southwestern portion of Serbia,
.as been one of the chief points of
ontention between the allies and the
entral powers 'in the eastern theater
f war. The present drive of the
rench and Russian forces appears to
e reaching closer to the city itself
han any previous drive. South of
tonastir is the plain of the same
ame. On this expanse the rival forces
f the two combinations of nations
ave been facing each other for
ionths. Saloniki, for which such a
attle was fought, is approximately 85
wiles to the east of this stronghold.
ParIs, Nov. 1.-After a violent bat-
.e, French forces have dislodged the
-ermpau troops which yesterday suc-
eeded in partly occupying the village
f Pressoire. The communique con-
rmed the report that in yesterday's
iolent assault the Germans utilized
iree entire divisions of troops and
ist heavily. Their net advantage was
st when the French regained the
aptured town during the night.
Bucharest, Nov. 16.-Following a
eries of violent combats, Roumanian
)rces have withdrawn from Areful to-
ard Radazinespi on the right bank
the river. Roumanian positions in
ie Jiul valley, it was asserted, had
een successfully maintained.
Petrograd, Nov. 16.--Russian forces
Ivanced in Transylvania, capturing'
rtified heights southeastward of
oldvesh. In Dobrudja the Russian
Ivance continues to progress south-
ard, the enemy retreating and set-
ng fire to villages.
Berlin, Nov. 16.-A transport steam-
of about 12,000 tons which was con-
yed by destroyers and patrol boats,
as torpedoed and sunk by a German
ibmarine 80 miles west of Malta, the
ar office announced today. Early to-
iy the British admiralty issued aj
atement regardiig the sinking of the1
earner saying it was obviously the

St. Paul, Nov. 16.-Officially counted
returns from Lab Qui Parle county
this afternoon boosted the Hughes
lead in Minnesota to 302. Returns
have been officially counted in 57 of 86
counties. Official tabulation in Hen-
nepin county (Minneapolis) the state's
largest county, although proceeding
slowly, has thus far failed to material-
ly effect the result.
New York, - Nov. 16.-Henry Sisen-
kiewicz, author of "Quo Vadis" died
yesterday in Swite'rland, according to
a cablegram to the Polish relief com-
mittee here today from Lausanne.
Detroit. Nov, 16.-After futile efforts
toward conciliation with the woman he
married 23 years ago and divorced 20
years, William Beck, a barber, ended
his life by shooting today in front of
the home of Mrs. Katherine Beck, his
former wife. A few minutes before
Mrs. Beck had refused to admit him
to the house. The body will be sent
to his mother in Akron, Ohio.
Washington, Nov. 16.-The navy de
partment wil soon be able to advertise
for bids for the "first in America" Zep-
pelin. The department announced
today it has been gathering informa-
tion of the construction of the success-
ful German type airship for months.
Boston, Nov. 16.-Oficials of Bemis
Brothers company announced this aft-
ernoon that Boston insurance com-
panies have recived cable dispatches
from Kingstown, Jamaica, which state
that the Harrison liner Engineer, re-
ported sunk by a German submarine,
has arrived at Kingstown. The En-
gineer is overdue at New Orleans, but
is expected to arrive there soon.
New York, Nov. 16.-It was learned
today that the Spanish liner Alicante
has for several days been taking on
hundreds of tons of munitions at her
dock at South Brooklyn, all consigned
to the Spanish military commission,
Barcelona, Spain. The consignment
includes several tons of metal work-
ing machines.

Members of the University of Michi-
gan military training corps will peti-
tion the board of regents for the estab-
lishment of a reserve officers' training
corps, under the provisions of the de-
fense act of June 3, 1916. This was
decided upon at a meeting of the corps
in the engineering building Wednes-
day night when 70 men turned out for
drill.
The defense act provides voluntary
as opposed to compulsory military
training, financially suDported by theI

'LANDSCAPE, HOUSE, AND-
GARDEN MAKE THE HOME
Prof. T. H. Mawson in Lecture Ex.
plains the Three Factors En-
tering Into Whole
A landscape, a garden, and a house
all taken together are necessary to
make a home, said Prof. Thomas H.
Mawson in effect in an illustrated talk
given in the lecture room of Memorial
hall last evening.
"The garden is where our highest
and best instincts may find satisfaction
away from the jarring notes and sordid1
aims of the outside world," he re-
marked in describing that feature of
the home with which his lecture prin-
cipally dealt. According to Prof. Maw-
son, the house is the central dominat-
ing part of every home and around it
and in harmony with its architecture
the gardens and landscape must be
arranged. Utility, individuality, pro-
portion and breadth, unity and style,
are the characteristics,saccording to
Prof. Mawson, which should govern
the formation of every landscape and
garden.
Most of the slides shown were illus-
trations of Prof. Mawson's own work.
Many beautiful old English homes
with their surroundings were shown.
The last slides, the ones which brought
forth a long applause from the audi-
ence, were colored photographs show-
ing the color arrangements of some of
the most beautiful of English gardens.
PENNSY EXTRA TO GIVE PLAY
BY PLAY STORY OF BIG GAME

Vic Pattengill, '11, and Sceretary Shir.
le) SiuitlI Also Delie'r Spee-es;
, Band on Hand
Marching: to the martial strains of
the "Victors" the Varsity band will
pass throug'i the campus and down
State street into Hill auditorium at
7:30 o'clock tonight where the last and
biggest football mass meeting of the
year will be staged.
Ed Shields, '94-'9GL, Vic Pattingill,
of the 1909 and 1910 football teams,
and Secretary Shirley W. Smith, of
the University, will be the three
speakers. Ed Shields won a Michigan
"M" in baseball in 1892-93. As a pep
producing orator he is the piek of the
Alumni speaker's. He pirov ed this fact
by the amount of enthusiasm which he
raised by his fiery speech at the M. A.
C. mass meeting of last year.
Bob Bennett will be on hand to lead
the students in the cheering which
promises. to be the loudest heard this
year. The band in full uniform will be
present to play the battle songs of
Michigan. The words ef the various
songs including "Laudes Atque Carm-
iua" will be thrown upon the screen
and sung by the students and alumm.
The main fioor of the auditorium
will be occupied by the men students
and the first balcony will be reserved
for women only. Seats in the second
balcony will be held for the alumni.
Students will be admitted by present-
ing coupon number 33 of their ath-
letic books. Alumni ticets may be
secured at the Union after 1 o'clock
today. Students applying for these
tickets must bring a list of the names
of the alumni to receive them.
Lea Wrn This Song
lie for-eTomorrow
Laudes atque carmina, 'nec hodie nec
eras,
Sed Omnia per tempora-dum locum
habeas,
Tibi sint dulcissima, O, Universitas;
At hostes, Pol perniciter eant eis
- korakas.

"Taking a trip with the team" is federal government, and with an or-
the name of the double page drawing ganization of uniformed military units
appearing in the Gargoyle today. This as nearly as possible like those of the
is the work of James Robertson, '19, land grant institutions, for such uni-
and is guaranteed to uncover all the versities and colleges which do not
(lark mysteries of the Cornell game to come under the provisions of the Mor-
the uninitiated. rill act.
Through a mistake in The Daily this The war department will provide
morning the head-line read that only all necessary military euipment, in-
1.000 gargoyles would be put on sale. cluding rifles, side arms, artillery,
One thousand will be put on sale to- animals and their caretakers, me-
day andt eremaistore sad000 wthe chanicians, blacksmiths, etc., and will
soldat he bok tors an onthebear all expenses of maintenance of
streets Saturday. these. The only financial obligations
According to Ralph Folz this num- put upon the universities require that
ber of the Gargoyle is one of the they provide bonds and insurance for
snappiest ever gotten out. The stories the safe-keeping and return of the
are witty and the jokes are new and equipment, and suitable quarters for
full of "punch." A lot of clever draw- the storage of the equipment and for
ings illustrate life of the campus a6ut the officers and class rooms of the
this time of the football season' military department.
In order to secure the detail of
DEPARTMENT ORDERS HOME United States army officers for mili-
6,000 NATIONAL GUARDSMEN tary instruction in institutions having,
four-year courses leading to the bach-
Washington, Nov. 16.-Five national elor's degree, the authorities of theI
guard infantry regiments totaling 6,000 institutions must agree to offer mili-
men have been ordered home. They tary courses in two groups. which,
were the 1st South Carolina, 7th New when once entered upon, become a re-'
York, 3rd Indiana, 3rd Wisconsin, and quirement for graduation. The first
3rd Minnesota. group of studies applies to students of
Regiments were ordered returned, the freshman and sophomore classes,
the war department said, "in continua- though it may be elected by the upper-
tion of the policy announced some time classmen, and is the equivalent of
ago by the war department to with- three hours per week for two years,
d'aw gradually the national guard or 12 semester hours altogether. The
regiments at the border as conditions advanced group is the equivalent of
permit," and in accordance with the 20 semester hours.
recommendation of General Funston. Students who elect the advanced
Regiments will be mustered out of the courses will receive $85 per year from
federal service upon arrival at the the government and will probably have
various state mobilization camps. (Continued on Page Six.)

3
s
t
l

Three thousand copies of the green
Pennsy extra will be on sale on the
streets five minutes after the whistle
ends the game on Ferry field. ,A full
detailed play by play account of the
game will be given, which will be re-
ceived at The Daily office over a spe-
cial wire. The rest of the paper will
contain accounts of the All-Fresh
squad and the promising men who
must take the places of some of the
men who are graduating this year.
U. S. Population Now 103,000,000
Washington, Nov. 16.-According to
the monthly report given out by the.
treasury department, Nov. 1, the popu-
lation of the United States is now 103,-
000,000.

0
0

Miorus.
Gloria Victoria, 0 Decus omnium
salve Universitas, Michiganensi
Michiganensium.

mnsy Programs
.o on Sale Today
-ograms of the Pennsylvania-Mich-
football game will be put on sale
y at 25 cents each. A number of
resting articles contribute to the
ess of this year's book and the
son is illustrated by 78 cuts of the
as and members of the squads.
nong the special articles written
the occasion are: Aareview of the
* football season, an article by
a Maulbetsch, '17, captain of the
sity team; one by Niel M. Mathews,
ain of the Pennsylvania squad;
o Beautiful Verses," written espe-
y for the program by Ring Lard-
sport writer of fame and a former
lent at Michigan; the Pennsylvania
Michigan songs, including "Laudes
e Carmina"; all the Michigan foot-
scores from 1878 to the Cornell
e; complete statistics of both
ids from the time they graduated

r ar

ON

4 A SOUVENIR IN ITSELF, THE PENNSY ISSUE OF

ON

SALE

THE

GARGOYLE

O clara Universitas-nec merum
Caecumbum.
Nec flores nimium breves, nec nard
Assyrium-
At gloriam victoriam, vovemus merito,
Nos tui cives, juvenes, tui perpetuo !
TRANSLATION.
Our sweetest songs and praises we
bring to you, 0 University, not today
nor tomorrow, but for all time, while
you endure; but as for our enemies,
to Hades with them swiftly.
Chorus.
All hail to you, O University of
Michigan, our glory and our victory,
the ornament of all things.
o renowned University, we rightly
pledge to you not the unmixed Caecu-
ban wine, nor the 911-too-shortlived
fiowere, nor yet Assyrian nard, but
glory and victory. We are your citi-
zens, your youths, yours forever.
CANADIAN HIGH CO3MISSIONNR
IN LONDON CO)MMANDS TROOPS
London, Nov. 16.--Speaking in com-
mons this afternoon, Major Bowden
asked if Sir Sam Hughes has any mili-
tary jurisdiction over Canadian troops,
or whether since his resignation their
command is vested in Sir George Per-
ley, Canada's' high commissioner in
London. Bonar Law, secretary for
the colonies, replied. that Perley's
powers included everything connected
with the Canadian forces, and that he
would consult with his majesty's gov
ernment regarding the best methods
of' gmnlovipy, tli

SALE

TODAY

15c-ON SALE EVERYWHERE-15c

TODAY

MICHIGAN 550 - OPPONENTS 0
Yost, "Maully, " "Bob" Folwell, Niel Mathews and Ring Lardner all have a word in
T~lE ENNSOY PROGIRAM
Have you seen a picture of "Willie" Heston or "Boss" Weeks? In 1901 they helped make a "point-a-
minute" for Michigan. They are all in the program on sale today. 78 pictures. Twenty-five cents.

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