100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 16, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

s u o.L m mas aw

--Ll

1 i w VY -A l UI"X
FOR ANN ARBOR-
FAIR AND PROBABLY
WARMER

.
"
r. . i "
>' 6

UNITED PRESS WI
DAY AND NIRT SERVYI
TIlE ONLY MORNING PAPE]
ANN ARBOR

I

VOL. XXVII. No. 39.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURS DAY, 'O ['16, 1916.

PRICE FIVE (

" t I

F ENGAND N
SEEMSIMNN
PRESIDENT OF BRITISH BOARD
OF TRADE GIVES
WARNING
TO SET LIMIT ON MILK PRICES
Says Use of Sugar by People Must Be
Chcked; -May Institute
Food Tickets
London, Nov. 15.-Warning that the
situation in England had reached the
point where the government "may be
compelled to take artificial means to
limit the consumption of food" was
sounded in the house of commons to-
day by Walter Runciman, president of
the board of trade.
As one of the first steps toward
meeting the present situation Runci-
man announced the government will
limit milk .prices. He said he favored
the appointment of a food controller
for England, with greater powers than
any similar official. The controller
will be named by the premier later it
was indicated.
"Conscription Gone Too Far."
"Consription has gone too far,"
said Runciman in the course of a de-
bate on the food question. "Vfen mut
be brought back for farming and ship-
building, 'r the government may be
compelled to take artificial means to
limit the food consumption."
Runciman announced that the gov-
ernment would assume the power to
institute food tickets at any time it
chooses. He said orders were to be
issued this week covering the point he
had mentioned, which, he added, was
only the first step. The premier, he
explained, will announce the name of
food controller later. Meanwhile the
board of trade will execute the new
powers of control over foodtprices,
handing these powers over to the gov-
ernment officials on a day's notice.
Prevent Undue Profits on Potatoes.
Runciman declared the use of sugar
by the people of England must be
stopped to a degree. Measures are
also imminent, he said, to prevent un-
due profits being realized from the
sale of potatoes. He 'recommended
that negroes be used in unloading
British ships in French ports instead
of soldiers. Runciman explained that
under the new restrictive plan, the
government / assumes the power to
regulate markets of wheat and other
commodities.
GRADUATE WRITES NEW BOOK
Steward Edward White, '95, Gathers
Material in Africa for
"Leopard Woman"
Steward Edward White of the class
of '95, has just had published the lat-
est addition to his long list of fascinat-
ing stories, "The Leopard 'Woman."
The plotof this latest story from the
pen of Mr. White is woven around two
characters, an English missionary and
a mysterious. and fascinating woman
of the African wilds. Mr. White gath-
ered material for the book whi on
a recent hunting expedition in East
Africa.
Mr. White has been writing continu-
ously almost from the time of- his
graduation from the University. He is
a .citizen of Michigan, being a resident:
of Grand Rapids.

Republicans Start Contest in N. Mexico
Roswell, N. M., Nov. 15.-Contest
proceedings were filed today by Re-
publican leaders in the district court
of Chaves county, attacking the elec-
tion results in eight precincts of east-
ern New Mexico. Democratic plural-
ities of approximately 575 were re-
corded in the precincts in question. In-
timidation and irregularities were
charged.

Gives Report On
Vote Fraud Probe
Attorney General Gregory Tells Wil-
son of Progress in Investigation
Chiefly About Negroes
Washington, Nov. 15.-Progress in
the investigation of public fraudulent
voting was reported to President Wil-
son today by Attorney General Greg-
ory. The attorney general after his
conference at the White House, said
the inquiry being pursued by his
agents was going forward rapidly.
The most important object of the
investigation he said was the move-
ment of thousands of negroes from
southern states into Ohio, Indiana, and
Illinois, 90 days before the election.
"Details of this movement we have
on hand in full," said Gregory.
Chicago, Nov. 15.-Ohio State Uni-
versity at Columbus was today named
as one of the five colleges in the cen-
tral west to be a United States army
training school, under the national de-
fense act. Culver Military Academy at
Culver, and Purdue University are two
others. The announcement was made
by General Barry.
Washington, Nov. 15. - Benjamin
Brahan and Joseph Williams, Ameri-
cans under arrest at Juarez, Mexico,
will be tried there in a few days in
the presence of United States Counsel
Edwards. The plan of tie Mexican
authorities to take them to Chihuahua
City for trial was frustrated by a state
department protest. The charge against
the men is not known.
Washington, Nov. 15.-Four oil tanks
are burning at Puerto, Mexico,, and
others are threatened, according to in-
formation wirelessed to the navy de-
partment by Commander Traut of the
battleship Illinois.
New York Nov. 15.-Bringing a
story of how her 229 passengers sang
and danced while the ship raced for
Fayal with fire in her bunkers, the
French liner Chicago arrived here to-
day from Bordeaux.
"BOOSTERS" VISIT ANN ARBOR
Oklahoma Delegation Shown Around
City and Banqueted by
Rotarians
One hundred citizens of Okmulgee
county, Okla., yesterday descended
upon the city and talked as only
boosters can of the merits of their
home district. The boosters arrived
in their special train of seven coaches
yesterday morning and were met at
the depot by a delegation from the
Civic association, the University, and
the Rotary club. They were taken
around the city by the Rotarians and
banqueted at the Union.
Before the boosters left town in
the afternoon, a great many people
availed themselves of the opportunity
to inspect their exhibition car.
CHARLES MORGAN, JR., ARRIVES
IN CITY TO READ 1917 OPERA
Charles Morgan, Jr., of Philadelphia,
director of "Tres Rouge," the Michi-
gan Union opera of last year, will
arrive in Ann Arbor Saturday to read
the 1917 book, and to make prelim-
inary arrangements for the production
which will be staged in March.
The opera this year will go back to
the, style of former shows in that it

will deal for the most part with Uni-
versity life. In humor and originality
it is reported to surpass all others
that have ever been given.
Right Cost of Living Will Be Probed
Washington, Nov. 15.--Strong efforts
to abate the high cost of living soon
will be under way, administration of-
ficials said today. Food prices will be
subjected to a searching investigation.

PLAN SERIES OF
'PEP' MEETINGS

Students to Meet in Front of
at 4:05 o'Clock Tomorrow;
loW Band to Field

U-Hall
Fol-

MEET IN AUDITORIUM AT NIGHT
With the assembling of the student
body in front of University hall to-
morrow afternoon begins a series of
pep meetings which wil be held both
for the purpose of helping the team
defeat the Quakers on Saturday and
celebrating its success after the game.
The first of the series is the twilight
meeting Friday afternoon followed by
the mass meeting that night, with the
hugh celebration ending the revelry
Saturday night.
The twilight cheer fest begins to-
morrow at 4:05 o'clock when the stu-
dent body and the band will meet in
front of University hall. Led by the
band the students will march down to
Ferry field and take seats in the north
stand. Bob Bennett will be on hand to
lead the cheering. Accompanied by
the band the rooters will practice sing-
ing the old Michigan song "Laudes
Atque Carmina" which will be sung at
the Pennsylvania game.
The final football mass meeting of
the year to be staged in Hill auditor-
ium at 7:30 o'clock Friday night, will
costitute the second number of the
series. "Vic" Pattingill, '11, of the
1909 and 1910 football teams and Sec-
retary Shirley W. Smith, of the Uni-
versity, will be two of the speakers
at the pep meeting. Although the re-
mainder of the program has not been
announced the promoters have stated
that it will be such as to stir up more
pep than has been in evidence at any
mass meeting this year.
Alumni tickets may be secured at
the Union after 1 o'clock on Friday
afternoon. Students will use athletic
coupon number 33 for the meeting.
Provided that Michigan defeats the
Red and Blue eleven on Saturday a
hugh celebration will be held that
night.
The complete program for the mass
meeting Friday night and the details
of the celebration on Saturday night
will soon be announced.
HUSSEY ONCE VISITE I LOWELL
Famous Astronomer Who Died Recent-
ly was Originator of Mars
Theory
Prof. W. J. Hussey, of the astronomy
department, was at one time a guest
for a week of Percival Lowell, one of
the foremost astronomers of the Unit-
ed State's who died Monday night, at
his home in Flagstaff, Ariz.
Mr. Lowell leaped into international
fame when he first advanced his theory
of the inhabitation of the planet Mars.
He was also the originator of the
Mars canal theory, and to his death,
maintained that he had proved the ex-
istence of vegetation and artificial
canals on the planet.
In 1903 Mr. Hussey paid a visit to
Mr. Lowell and spent a week in the
observatory that had been financed
personally by Mr. Lowell and while
there conducted some of his observa-
tions in the Flagstaff observatory.
Capitalist and Business Man Dead
London, Nov. 15.-C. D. Rudd,
eminent world-wide capitalist and once
a partner of Cecil Rhodes, is dead.

Start America -Japan Wireless
San Francisco, Nov. 15.-Sitting in Washington today, President
Wilson exchanged greetings by wireless with the emperor of Japan,
formally opening the longest commrercial wireless service ever used.
This was the San Francisco-Tokio direct communication wireless, es-
tablished by the Marconi company. President Wilson's message, which
was a greeting from the American people to the people of Japan,
was the flrst handled through the new wireless. It follows:
"Ijis Imperial Majesty, Emperor of Japan:
"The government and the people of the United States send greet-
ings to your imperial majesty and to the people of Japan, and rejoice
in this triumph of science, which enables the voice of America from
the far west to cross the silent space of the world and speak to
Japan in the far east, hailing the dawn of a new day.
"May this wonderful event confirm the unbroken friendship of
our two nations and give assurance of a never-ending interchange of
messages of good will. May the day soon come when the voice of
peace carried by these silent messengers shall come to all the world
and its works to the end of the earth."
Messages were also sent to Minister of Communications Tanaka
and to the American ambassador from the Japanese ambassahr at
Washington.

LTURE BEFORE
61O U HINDU POET GIVES VFEW
OF FAR EAST; ADVOCATES
LACK OF NATIONALISM
APPEARS IN NATIE COSTUMI
'I
Accuses Western World of Starving
Personal Man for Benefit of
Professional
Sir Rabindranath Tagore last nighi
delivered the message of the east tc
the west, when he gave his address in
Hill auditorium before an audience of
over 2,000 people, speaking on "The
National Idea Among Mankind."
Mr. Tagore characterized the mod-
ern nation as a creature of science
and selfishness, and said, "You have
chosen nationalism as your religion.'
In his arraignment of the national idea
he said, "The lamp of ancient Greece
is extinct in the land where the torch
of nationalism was first lighted. The
power of Rome lies dead and buried
under the ruins of its vast empire, bu'
the civilization whose basis is society
and the sp'rioul ideal of mnan is still
alive in China and India."
Mr. Tagore, accused the western
world as expressed in its nationalism o
starving the life of the personal man
for the benefit of the professional man
and claimed that the nations have gone
far ahead of the complete moral man
Mr. Tagore appearing in native cos.
tume, created a profound impression
He also read three of his own poems
which were very well received by the
audience.

GIE VAIED PROGRAM
A1T TIIGHT CONCEIRT
Members of School of Music Faculty-
Perform; Earl V. Moore Fea-
tures Program
About 2,000 people attended the twi-
light recital in Hill auditorium yester-
day afternoon and enjoyed the varied
and well balanced program presented
by members of the School of Music
faculty-
Earl V. Moore, organist, who pre-
sented the major portion of the pro-
gram, played in his usual clean-cut
and artistic manner. Among his num-
bers Guilmaut's "Prayer and Cradle
Song" and "Lamentation," Johnson's
"Elfentanz" and "Christmas in Sicily"
by Yon were especially wellreceived.
Miss Nora C. Hunt, contralto, sang
the well-known Mascagni "Ave Maria"
and Gounod's "0 Divine Redeemer"
with much feeling and her renditions
were well received. Miss Lucile John-
son, harpist; Anthony J. Whitmire,
violinist, and Lee N. Parker, 'cellist,
assisted in these numbers.
NO~~~~"3 ~U IEAANTYPSI

SAY WtILSON 1LEADS IN
CALIFORNIA BY83,700
Ogficial Count in Western State Show
- Gain of 471 Votes for
President
San Francisco, Nov. 15.-Unless a
vital error is discovered in returns
from one of the larger counties of
California, President Wilson's plur-
ality when the official count is com-
pleted will be between 3,700 and 3,800
votes. This estimate was indicated
this afternoon on the face of com-
plete official returns from 48 of the 58
counties in California, as tabulated by
the United Press.
The official returns of these coun-
ties show the following totals: Hughes,
:,36,047; Wilson, 150,167.. This is a
ain of 471 for Wilson over his plur-
ality as shown in the unofficial count
from the same counties.
The totals of the vote for the two
candidates in these 48 counties gave
Wilson a lead of 14,120. The ten larg-
est counties in the state have not yet
completed their official count. Unof-
ficial returns show Hughes carried
Alameda, Los Angeles, San Bernardino.
San Diego, and Santa Clara, his un-
official plurality in the five counties
aggregating 34,120.
Wilson carried Butte, Presno, Sacre-
mento, San Francisco and Stanislaus
counties, the plurality aggregating 23,-
.10. This leaves Hughes a lead in
these ten counties of 10,220. Reduc-
ing this from Wilson's official lead of
14,120 in the other 48 counties leaves
Wilson's net lead 3,910.

CHECK LATE B1ITISH1

City

Health Officer Decares Such
Method Futile in Guarding
Against, Smallpox

Berlin Reports Allies halted After
Partial Success on Somme
Berlin, Nov. 15.-British attacks
south of the Ancre between Le Sars
and Guedecourt just south of Bapaume
were only partly successful, although
strong masses of infantry were used.
The statement declared yesterday's
battle with the British on both sides
of the Ancre Brook went on from
morning until night, and constituted
one of the greatest battles of the
Somme fighting.
"Thebattle north of the Somme con-
tinues," the statement said. "The
struggle going on yesterday makes
Nov. 14 one of the greatest battle days.
The English hoping they could follow
up successes obtained at the begin-
ning of the attack, assaulted our lines
again with strong masses north of the
Ancre. They succeeded in capturing
the village of Beaucourt but on all
parts of the long front of attack, their
advance broke down with heavy losses
just before our positions."

No quarantine will be placed against
Ypsilanti by the local board of health.
This would be a futile method of
guarding against the outbreak of
smallpox in this city, according to Dr.
John Wessinger, city health officer.
"A quarantine would be unsuccess-
ful," said Dr. Wessinger yesterday.
"We have taken other steps which we
believe will prove sufficient to control
the situation. The University author-
ities have posted bulletins warning
students that if they expose themselves
to possible infection in Ypsilanti they
will be quarantined if discovered.
"The Normal College -has ceased to
issue permits to students who wish to
make the trip to Ann Arbor and we
have called home all those Normal
College students whose homes are in
Ann Arbor. This regulation will be
in force for a week or ten days."

HUMOR MAGAZINE OUT FRIDAY
November Edition of Gargoyle Con-
tains Double Page Drawing;
To Print 1,000
November's edition of the Gargoyle
nearly caused a tragedy-at least, the
Gargoyle business staff avers so. The
lin-o-type man that set up the copy
laughed so hard that he had to be
carried home on a stretcher, and the
drawings are just as funny as the
stories and jokes.
That we may all have as much fun
as the printer, the Gargoyle will put
1,000 copies on sale Friday morning.
This edition will contain 300 more
copies than any former one.
The front cover design will be in
three colors and is a picture of a
Michigan football man in full uniform.
Back of the figure, which is large even
for a Gargoyle cover, can be seen the
stands and green of Ferry field. The
figure is in yellow and blue. A big
double page drawing will be one of
the many good things in this issue.

PROFESSOR SANDERS

TA]

* *
*
*
*:
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

* * * * * * * * * * ** * * 4 * * * * *. * * * *

N O T I C E

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Classical Club to Stage Series of Lec-
tures for Members Only
Professor Sanders open~s this year's
series of Classical club lectures with
an illustrated talk on "Roman Ruins
and Excavations." Professor Sanders,
who has recently returned from Rome,
where he was acting director of the
School of Classical Studies of the
American Academy, is one of the most
interesting speakers on the classical
faculty, and is particularly qualified to
speak on this subject.
Owing to the increased membership
of the club, the lecture, will not be
open to the public as heretofore, al-
though members may invite their
friends. The meeting will begin
promptly at 7:30 o'clock this evening
in room A Alumni Memorial hall.

ALL MEN WHO WANT TO USHER FOR PENNSYL-
VANIA GAME, CALL AT THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIA-
TION OFFICES, PRESS BUILDING, MAYNARI) ST.,
TODAY AND RECEIVE ASSIGNMENTS.

*

,

* * * * * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * *

- U U
L~ U U

It Will Be CREEN .AThis Time

ANN=
y

;
;,
" 4.a r'e';
,,; . ,

vUy ~

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan