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November 15, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-15

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THE WEATHER
ANN ARBOR-
WEDXES IAY-PAtTLY CJO U1)Y,
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UN - ED PRESS WIF
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER
ANN ARBOR

VOL. XXVII. No. 38, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1916. PRICE FIVE C

ON ROUANIAN
AND [EST FOTS
BERLIN ANNOUNCES EVACUATION
OF lEA EMONT HAMEL AND
ST. PIERRE DIVION
CAPTURE 4,000 GERMANS
Eastern Front Reports Russians have
Crossed Danube Below
Cernavoda
The past day has been marked by
advances for the allies on both the
eastern and western fronts, in the face
of stubborn Teuton resistance. Berlin
admits reverses on the west, and an-
nounces activities of French in Mace-
donia
Iin the West.
Berlin, via Wireless to Sayville, Nov.
14.-Evacuation of Beaumont Hamel
and St. Pierre Divion was announced
by the war office this afternoon. The
official statement said, "Our strong de-
fense caused us considerable loses,"
but declared the "British also suffered
considerable sacrifices."
London, Nov. 14.--The British today
continued their successful smash
against the heavily fortified German
positions on the Ancre. The war of-
fice this afternoon reported progress
at Beaucourt-sur-Ancre, where 4,000
Germans were taken prisoners. Bitter
fighting continued in the outskirts at
noon.
Fragmentary press dispatches reach--
ing here today told of a spread of the
fighting several miles northward which
led to the belief that General Haig's
forces have started a drive on Serre.
While interest today centered in this
latest Haig smash, great importance
also is attached to reports from the
eastern front that Russians in force
have crossed the Danube from a point
below Cernavoda. This gives the
11usso-Roumanians re-enforcements at
d point where they already have an
advantage over Mackensen's left wing.
Petrograd and Bucharest today re-
ported the Teutonic left wing In re-
treat, but the Berlin war office state-
ment said that the field marshal is
maintaining his positions there.
In the East.
Berlin, Nov. 14.-French cavalry
forces are participating in fierce fight-
ing which is going on in Macedonia.
the war office reported today. The
Franco-Serbian troops remain on the
offensive on the Monastir plain and
along the Cerna river.
Bucharest, Nov. 14.-Attacks which
had been made without interruption in
the Uzul valley on the River Casin
since Oct. 29, were finally repulsed
with heavy lo'sses to the enemy, the
Roumanian war office reported today.
In the counter attacks that followed
only 83 prisoners were taken alive it
was stated. Three machine guns and
other booty were captured.
German and British Middles Held
London, Nov. 14.--Forty-four thou-
sand German naval prisoners are held
by the British. and 31,000 British naval
prisoners are held by the Germans, it
was announced in the house of com-
mons today.
Teutons Bag 104 Allies' War Birds
Berlin, Nov. 14.-Seventeen German

and 104 allied' aeroplanes were de-
stroyed during the October fighting on
all fronts, the waT office announced to-
day. "We have 66 hostile aeroplanes
in our possession," the statement said.
Gravel Roads at Foresiry Farm Fixed
The' gravel roads of the forestry
farm are being repaired this week.
Other improvements will be made as
soon as weather permits.

West Wants Look
At Nan It Chose
Ph d 't~ , I eegrphWish That
r, ilon Travel t Foot-
Jhills o the Recklies
Washington, Nov. 14.-The far west
having returned President Wilson to
office now wants to see him. Scores
of telegrams from different points
along the Rocky mountain and Pacific
coast states came to the White. house
today urging the president to come out
and look over the country that turned
its electoral vote in his favor.
Denver, Col., wants him there for a
celebration to be held in his honor
Thanksgiving Day, but it is impossible
for the president to get away now for
an extended trip.
Washington, Nov.14.-The interstate
commerce commission today ordered
cancelled big rate increases to Pacific
coast points, which increases were in-
augurated last spring when the Pana-
ma canal was closed and water com-
petition on transcontinental goods was
removed.
New London, Conn., Nov. 14.-Thq
German submarine Deutschland was
given two submersion tests this after-
noon and it was said to be in shape
to put out to sea later in the week.
Ottawa, Canada, Nov. 14.-Sir Rob-
ert Borden today put a definite quietus
on the rumor that he intended to va-
cate the premiership of the Dominion.
He said he considered it his duty to
remain in office until the war was'
ended and would do so even in the
event of an election, if his party were
returned to power.
THOMAS H.'MWSNTO.
GISVE TALK TOMORROW

FACULTY TO G1IVE
INITIAL RECITAL
Earl V. Moore to Show Possibilities of
Frieze Memorial Organ in
1111 Auditorium
QUINTET TO RENDER NUMBERS
The faculty recital at. 4:15 o'clock
this afternoon in Hill auditorium will
afford the first opportunity of the year
to really hear the great Frieze me-
morial organ. Mr. Earl V. Moore,
head of the organ department, will
present two groups of numbers which
will show to good advantage the pos-
sibilities of this instrument.
When first brought to Ann Arbor
from the Columbian exposition at Chi-
cago, this organ was set up in Uni-
versity hall where it remained for
about 20 years. Upon the completion
of Hill auditorium, it was moved to
that building and completely rebuiltj

The Team Is Doing Its Share-
Come Out and Do Yours Friday
The team that has put Michigan back on the football map is get-
ting ready for Pennsylvania. It Is working hard every day down
on Ferry field preparing'for Saturday. Rain, snow or shine, the boys
are there every afternoon with a willingness to work, and a deter-
ainilation to wiln.
Friday afternoon at 4:05 o'clock the student body will have an
opportunity to do its share toward a victory on Saturday. Assemble
in fronit of University hall and follow the band to Ferry field. Take
seats in the north stand, and we will cheer the team and practice
singing the old Michigan song "Laudes Atque Carmina," to be sung at
the Pennsylvania game. The team will be taking its last workout
before the final game. The presence of several thousand enthusiastic
Michigan men will inspire the team with support that it has from a
confident student body.
The team will be there.
The band will be there.
Bob Bennett, the cheer leader will be there.
Mr. Student, will you be there?
The answer is-"Yes, we'll be there."
And don't forget that there will be another monster mass meet-
ing in Hill auditorium Friday night. "Vic" Pattingill, '11, of the
1909 and 1910 football teams will talk. Watch The Daily for further
details.

NOTED HINDU POE1
SPEAKSTONilHT I
HILL A;11UDTO
S I R RABINDRANAT T A G0
TALKS ON "NATIONAL IDEA
AMONG MANKIND"

ON WAY TO EASTERN CIT

Philosopher
and

Is Opposed to Nat
Claims It Caused
Present War

Sir
poet,

Rabindranath Tagore, H
philosopher and mystic,

'

speak at 8 o'clock tonight in
auditorium on the subject, "The

at a cost of;
sidered one
gans in the
strument is
organs, the
solo organs
the back of

$20,000. Today it is con-
of the finest concert or-
world. This massive in-
made up of five distinct
choir, great, swell, and
being placed together at
the stage, and the echo

DIstlngnished Landscape Designer
Show Illustrations of
Own Work

to

Mr. Thomas H. Mawson, the dis-
tin guislied English landscape designer,
will give an illustrated lecture under
the auspices of the department of
land scape design in Memorial hall at
8 o'clock tomorrow evening. The title
of the lecture is "The Making of a
Home, or the Unity of House and
Garden," and it will be illustrated in
part by examples of the lecturer's own
work.
Mr. Mawson is undoubtedly the most
prominent member of his profession in
England. Included in his'"most re-
cent work is a town plan for Athens.
This town planning scheme will make
of the Greek capital one of the great
world centers, not only for beauty,
but for commercial prosperity and so-
cial amenity. The value of her archi-
tectural remains will be greatly en-
hanced by removing modern slums
and the creation of suitable and har-
monious surroundings for the ruins.
Modern facilities, such as the trans-
continental railway, will be provided
without interference with their aesthe-
tic and sentimental value.
Admission to the lecture tomorrow
evening will be free and it is hoped
that it will make a wide appeal both
in the University and in the city nmong
all those who are interested in the
making of beautiful homes.
F'n ! g Elevator Injures 17 Students
Kansas City, Nov. 14.-Seventeen
students of William Jewell College
were injured, several of them seri-
ously, when an elevator in the Kansas
City Railways company fell four floors
this afternoon.
l 0ighi Cost of Paper Bits Paris Sheets?
Paris, Nov. 14.-A bill is shortly to
be introduced in the house of deputies
compelling newspapers to cut their
size (lown to two pages twice a week
in order to save print paper.

organ, which is located above the
auditorium ceiling.
One number which is certain to be
of interest, is "Christmas in Sicily,"
by Yon, which is decidedly oriental in
character and the theme of which is
given out on the chimes.
Two other numbers will be pre-
sented by Lucile Johnson, contralto,
assisted by Lucile Johnson, harpist;
Anthony J. Whitmire, violinist; Lee N.
Parker, 'cellist, and Earl V. Moore,
organist.
The complete program is as follows:
Allegro from First Symphony...
.Macquaire
Prayer and Cradle Song,
Lamentation ............... Guilmant
Earl V. Moore
Ave Maria ..................Mascagni
Nora C. Hunt, Lucile Johnson,. Anthony
J. Whitmire, Lee N. Parker,
Earl V. Moore.
Claire de Lune..........Krag-Elert
Elfentanz ................... Johnson
Christmas in Sicily...............Yon
Finale from Eighth Symphony....
............................. W idor
Earl V. Moore.
O Divine Redeemer.........Gounod
Nora C. Hunt, Lucile Johnson, Anthony
J. Whitmire, Lee N. Parker,
Earl V. Moore.
PASSES RHODES EXAMINATION
Ralph Il. Carson, '17, Must Win Per-
sonal Test to Gain Scholarship
Announcement was made yesterday
that Ralph M. Carson, '17, has passed
the Rhodes scholarship examination
for the state of Michigan. The exam-
inations were held Oct. 3 and 4.
Before Carson wins the Rhodes
scholarship he has to pass the exam-
ination on personal qualifications, in-
cluding qualities of manhood, person-
ality, and the like. The scholarship
examination is graded by the board of
examiners in Oxford, England, while
the personal qualifications of the can-
didate are passed on by a board con-
sisting of the president of the Univer-
sity, the dean of the college of litera-
ture, science and the arts, the chief
justice of the state supreme court, and
presidents of two colleges in the state.

ANNUALUNION SHOW TO'
BE1REUiVEDTHIS YEAR
"Spotlight Vandeville" to Be Given
Tuesday; Free to Union
Members
On Tuesday evening, Nov. 28, the
annual Union "spotlight vaudeville"
will be revived. Last year the com-
mittee on student affairs ruled this
entertainrnent out owing to the great
number of campus functions scheduled
to take place. With the elimination of:
several of these this year, the oppor-
tunity was again given the Union to
present its show.
No admission will be charged Union
members or life members. To others
the customary 25 cent fee will be as-
sessed. Donald Smith, '17E, is gen-
eral chairman for the entertainment,l
and Morrison C. Wood, '17, is program
director. The salient feature of the
entertainment will be an old fashioned
minstrel show with prominent campus
singers and comedians in the leading
roles. Union officials hint at the prob-
ability of making this performance a
stepping stone to the annual opera
which takes place during March.
All men interested in either the min-
strel or the vaudeville parts of the
production are urged to see Donald
Smith, '17E, at the Union between 3
and 5 o'clock this afternoon.
ALL-LAW SMOKER HELD LAST
NIGHT AT MICHIGAN UNION
"The best one yet, everything went
fine," remarked L. S. Moll, '17L, chair-
man of the All-Law smoker commit-
tee, last night after the smoker be-
gan to clear away from the Union
rooms and the law men to go to their
different homes. Four kegs of cider
and a big pile of doughnuts were con-
sumed.
Prof. R. E. Bunker emphasized- the
value of these gatherings where stu-
dents and faculty men meet together
on a common plane for social purposes
by tracing the careers of several men
vwho had gone out from the Law School
after becoming intimate with some of
the faculty members.

CARRANZISTAS SHOW NEW
ACTIViY AGINT ILLA
Bandits Withdraw in Chihuahua as Re-
enforcements from Sonora
Arrive
BULLETIN.
El Paso, Nov. 14.-A fohmal re-
quest for the release of Benjamin
Brahn, one of General Pershing's
scouts now held in jail at Juarez
on a charge of being a Villista
spy, was made on the Mexican de
facto government by the state de-
partment in Washington. This was
learned definitely here late this
afternoon.
El Paso, Nov. 14.-Active prepara-.
tions for a new campaign against Vil-
listas are under way in northern Mex-
ico, it was announced at the Mexican
consulate here today. General Murgia
will assume command of the southern
and central forces in the state of Chi-
huahua, while several thousand de
facto government troops in Sonora
will be withdrawn from the campaign
against the Yaqui Indians and marched
across the mountains into western
Chihuahua.
In answer to many telegrams from
relatives and friends of the ten Ameri-
cans thought to have been at Parral
during the reported attack on that
town by Villistas, United States au-
thorities today admitted they had no
word from any of the men in nearly
four weeks. Two weeks have passed
since the reported Villista raid.
Washington, Nov. 14.-Villistas are
withdrawing from the neighborhood of
Chihuahua City, Secretary of State
Lansing announced today, quoting bor-
der officials. Large forces of Car-
ranzistas are arriving to re-enforce the
garrison there, Secretary Lansing said.
The secretary asserted he had been in-
formed that railroad and telegraphic
communication with the city had been
resumed.
STANDARU OIL LESSENS HOURS
Big Company Announces Adoption of
Eight-Hour Day for Workers
San Francisco. Nov. 14.-The Stand-
ard Oil company offices here today
posted a bulletin announcing that the
company had adopted the eight-hour
day for all employees, skilled and un-
skilled. This applies to the refineries,
pipe lines, and producing departments.
There will be no change in wages it
was announced.

tional Idea Among Mankind." This
is one of the 30 lectures that Mr.
Tagore is delivering throughout the
United States. He has been touring
the country since Oct. 12, coming here
by way of Japan where he delivered a
series of addresses.
Mr. Tagore has already spoken at
Seattle, Chicago, and Detroit, and is
now on his way east where he will
deliver addresses at New York and
Boston. The Hindu poet ranks as one
of the famous writers of the present
day, and since his winning of the
Nobel prize in literature in 1913, he has
grown to his present place in litera-
ture.
Mr. Tagore is opposed to nationalismi
as an ideal and is firm in the belief
that the hatred that nationalism en-
genders is at the bottom of the "satur-
nalia of blood" tat is now devastating
Europe. Mr. Ta.ore is of the belief
that a universal religion will some. day
arise, but he does not subscribe to
the belief that this religion will take
one form.
Calls for reservations for seats have
been received from many of the neigh-
boring towns and much interest is be-
ing shown in the visit of this distingu-
ished educator and poet to Ann Arbor.
Mr. Tagore will arrive in Ann Ar-
bor today at 2 o'clock, coming from
Cleveland where he spoke last night.
He will remain here until 10 o'clock
Thursday morning.
Mr. Tagore has announced that lie
will be glad to meet any who desire
to remain at the close of the lecture.
When he spoke in Detroit last Friday
night nearly the entire audience shook
hands with him.
GRIFFINS INITIATE THIRTEEN
All-Campus Honorary Society Holds
Banquet at Union for
Neophytes
Griffins, all-campus honor society,
held its seventeenth initiation followed
by a banquet at the Michigan Union
last night. Thirteen men were taken
in. Don A. Smith, '17E, acted as toast-
master.
Harold A. Taylor, '17E, gave a talk
on "The Griffin God"; Harry G. Gault,
'17L, on "The Portals of Grffins; H.
A. Fitzgerald, '17, on "Beyond the
Gates," and Dr. H. H. Cummings, head
of the University health service, on
"Griffin Medicus."
The neophytes are: Willis Brodhead,
'17E, Conrad N. Church, '17, H. L.
Davis, '17, H. A. Fitzgerald, '17, Ralph
W. Harbert, '17, H. C. L. Jackson, '18,
Waldo M. McKee, '18E, Maurice
Nicholls, '17E, Earl E. Pardee, '17, D.
W. Sessions, '17L, Gordon Smith, '17E,
Carlos A. Zanelli, '17E, and Harold M.
Zeiger, '17.
Northwestern University Without Head
About a month ago the president of
the University of Northwestern resign-
ed and the chairman of the board of
regents has announced that for the
present they will get along without an
official executive.

CRAPTSI1EN CLUB
Trip to Detroit today
SPECIAL CARS leave Masonic Temple at 3
o'clock, this afternoon. Will stop at the Delta.
Every student Mason should avail himself of the trip. c
FARE 75c

. a ,

TONICHT
Hill
uditorium

IN NATIVE COSTUME

SEATS AT
Wahr's

Rabi n d r an a t h

Tagore

1

"The National Idea Among Mankind"

$1, .75,50, 25

i

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