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November 09, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-09

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ANN ARBOR-,
RAIN AND COLDER
THURSDAY

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UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

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VOL. XXVII. No. 32. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENTS
Wilson's Lead Cut in Doubtful States:
Republicans Claim ictory for Huges

PLANS COMPLETE,
FOR CORNELLMASS
MEETING TONIGHT,

"PEP"
TO

FEST IN HILL AUDITORIUM
BEGIN AT 7:45 O'CLOCK;
PRESENT COUPON 34

CARPELL AND MURPHY TO TALK
After Meeting Students Follow Band
to Station to See Varsity En-
train for Ithaca
It will rival the spirit and en-
thusiasm that prevailed at the monster
demonstration of 1914 which sent the
fighting eleven to Harvard! Such is
the prediction for the Cornell mass
meeting tonight. The time is set for
7:45 o'clock, and the place Hill audi-
torium. Admittance is to be gained by
the presentation of coupon number 34
of the athletic book at the door.
According to the student council and
the a4hletic association, which are be-
hind the project, more enthusiasm is
expected than was displayed at the
former event, while preparations have
been made which will make the spec-
tacle a noteworthy one in the annals
of the University.
Staatz M. Abrams, '17E, will act as
chairman of the gathering, introduc-
ing speakers Otto Carpell, '11-'14L, and
Frank Murphy, '12-'16L. Carpell, who
won fame as half back on several Yost
aggregations, is said to have few
equals as an instiller of "pep," while
the rapid-fire oratory of Murphy easily
wins for him the appelation of "The
Verbal Tornado."
Cheers and songs will be led fly
"Bob" Bennett, '18, while the band in
full uniform will be in evidence. A
local photographer will supply stere-
optican slides of members of the
Varsity. Coupons will admit to any
part of the auditorium, the first bal-
cony being reserved for women.
Following the mass meeting, the
audience will remain In their seats
until after the band and team have
passed out. A gigantic procession will
then be formed outside the auditorium,
the band leading, and the team in a
motor truck, decorated with the Uni-
versity colors, following. All along the
route of march, from Hill auditorium
to the Michigan Central station, the
way will be lighted by red fire. More
than 4,000 students are expected to
march in the procession to the sta-
tion.
The mass meeting itself will not ex-
ceed an hour in duration, while an-
other three-quarters will be taken up
with the formation and march. Rous-
ing cheers will speed the team on its
way at 9:45 o'clock.
Owing to the fact that the roof of
the M. C. station is extremely frail in
structure, it is earnestly requested that
students refrain from climbing upon
it, as has been the custom in past
years. It is asserted that should any
fail to heed this injunction, a number
of casualties are certain to result.
Arrest Albert Reed for Stealing Bicycle
Albert Reed was arrested by local
police authorities yesterday on a
charge of having sold a bicycle be-
longing to Frank Fohey. His trial
will be held in Justice William D.
Dotey's court at 10 o'clock, Nov. 14.

London Agog Over .election
By ED. L. KEEN
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
London, Nov. 8.-London will be almost as much wrought up over
the presidential election today as the United States. No American
election has ever aroused such wide spread interest as the Hughes-
Wilson finish. The newspapers got out almost as many extra editions
as some of the American newspapers must have run off their presses.
These editions were eagerly bought up and scanned for details.
Wherever there were crowds, there was betting, with the odds at
even or slightly in favor of President Wilson. Leading editorials
were not only flatteringly congratulatory to Governor Hughes today,
but they were also in some instances bitterly denunciatory of Presi-
dent Wilson.
"The whole world outside of the United States rejoices in his
(Wilson's) defeat," said the Evening Standard. "Now the belligerents
know what the United States will, say or do under Mr. Hughes and
diplomatic notes will soon become something more than raw material
for humorous papers."
Great Britain can unreservedly congratulate Americans, and es-
pecially Colonel Roosevelt on Hughes' election. Roosevelt stood up
boldly for the allies cause. It is understood he will get an import-
ant position," said the Evening Post.
"Americans feel their honor is in safe hands. German spite and
hatred had been President Wilson's reward for long suffering, well
intentioned attitude toward the central powers."
The Pall Mall Gazette said, "the new President is committed to
nothing beyond vindication of American rights wherever assailed or
imperilled."

KREISLER DAZZLES BIG.
,AUDIENCE, WITH VIOLIN

Noted Artist Presents Program
Unusual Variety and
Interest

DEIMORATIC AND REPUBLICAN CgANDIDTES CONTINUE
TO COMPETE FOR CHIEF EXECUTIVE'S OFFICE EARLY
' THIS MORNING WITH TWO STATES AS BATTLE GROUN'D

of

It is seldom that one sees a more
insistent and enthusiastic audience
than that which heard Fritz Kreisler
last evening in Hill auditorium. Judg-
ing from the continued applause
throughout the program one may safe-
ly say that the audience was com-
pletely captivated by the playing of
this distinguished artist. A great vio-
linist together with a program of un-
usual variety and interest, and an able
accompanist combined to make this re-
cital one of the really great musical
treats of the season.
Mr. Kreisler, whose fame as a vio-
linist and musician is world-wide, pos-
sesses a remarkable, technique and a
tone of such fullness and beauty that
its appeal is irresistible. His playing
is free from mannerisms and his per-
sonality is pleasing. His program,
which was admirably chosen, afforded
him ample opportunity to display his
versatility and musicianship. Kreisler's
technique, which is almost dazzling,
was shown to good advantage in
Pugnani's "Prelude and Allegro" and
the well known "Concerto in E minor"
by Mendelssohn. His splendid inter-
pretation of the latter number clearly
demonstrated his right to be termed
"the foremost interpreter of the great
classical concertos."
The second half the program was
made up of shorter, lighter numbers,
among which were many which were
familiar. Bach's "Air" for the G
string, Schubert's "Moment Musical,"
Dvorak's "Indian Lament," and Kreis-
ler's won "Caprice Viennois" were
numbers which were especially well
received. Besides repeating several
numbers, Kreisler responded to two
encores at the close of the program,
one of which was the well known
"Viennese Melody."
The splendid work of Carl Lamson
at the piano marks him as a pianist
and musician of the first rank. His
accompaniments, although never
standing out above the soloist, were
exceptionally well rendered, and added
much to the effectiveness of the pro-
gram.
The management wishes to com-
mend the audience very highly for
their observance of the traffic regula-
tions following last evening's concert.
Ann Arbor Enjoys Quiet Election Eve
No disturbances were reported to
the police department Tuesday night.
It was one of the quietest presidentiall
election nights in years.

DRY FORCES WIN OUT BY
BIG MARGININ COUNTY
Republicans Carry Off All Honors,
Hughes, Sleeper, and Bacon
Leading
Final returns emphasize a com-
plete victory of the dry forces in Ann
Arbor and Washtenaw county, pro-
hibition winning by a majority of 2,847.
The "Home Rule" bill was defeated
by a three to one vote. Ann Arbor
gave 2,549 votes for the prohibition
amendment and rolled up 2,257 against
the wets' amendment. Total votes cast
in the county for prohibition were
7,376, and against 4,529; for "Home
Rule," 3,670; against, 8,024.
Republicans carried off the richest
prizes in the campaign for county of-
fices. Hughes increased his majority
to a figure of 1,178. The total county
vote for the presidential nominees is:
Hughes, 6,158; Wilson, 4,980. Hughes
carried the city of Ann Arbor by- a
majority of 446 votes.
Sleeper carried the county by a ma-
jority of 1,172, getting a lead in the
city of Ann Arbor of 459 votes. Bacon
was winner over Beakes in the county,
getting a margin of 204 ballots in the
congressional race. Beakes led his
Republican opponent in Ann Arbor, his
home town, by a majority of 535,
Beakes still has a chance to win out
as complete returns from other coun-
ties in the Second district have not
been received.
Gruner won out over Feldkamp, his
opponent for county treasurer. by a
bare majority of 22 ballots. Lehman,
the Democratic candidate for prose-
cutor, retained his job by the close
majority of 88. Emory E. Leland, Re-
publican, won out for probate judge
by a plurality of 143. Herman Linden-
schmitt will stay at the county jail
as sheriff, having rolled up a majority
of 963 over his Democratic candidate.
The other county offices were won
by the following majorities: County
clerk, Edwin H. Smith, 722; register of
deeds, Perry L. Townsend, 875; drain
commissioner, Clayton E. Deake, 1,191.
All are Republicans. Samuel W.
Burchfield, Republican, and Leo J.
Kennedy, Democrat, won by comfort-
able majorities for the office of cor-
oner.
H. Wirt Newkirk, Republican, won
the office of representative in the state
legislature, First district, by a ma-
jority of 725. William M. Laird and
Floyd E. Daggett, both Republicans,
were easy winners for the office of
circuit court commissioners. Laird
polled 6,215 votes and Daggett, 6,305.
Osgood, Democrat, received a total of
5,147 votes for the office of surveyor.

Plan Speial Car
For Girls Tonight
'o Attachi Car_ to Train oi Which
Team Is to Travel
East
Announcement was made last night
that if 20 University women apply by
noon Friday, a special car will be run
for them to Ithaca to see the Cornell-
Michigan game. The men in charge
of arrangements state that this idea
was conceived following the arrival of
a large number of women students
from Washington University to see the
Washington-Michigan game here last
Saturday.
Applications have been received from
a few men to run a special car to
Ithaca tonight on the train which will
carry the football team. If approxi-
mately 18 more of these applications
are received, special cars to accommo-
date the applicants will be provided.
The train on which the team will
travel leaves the Michigan Central sta-
tion at9 :43 o'clock, following the mass
meeting.
Applications for reservations on this
train should be made between the
hours of 9 and 11 o'clock this morn-
ing to E. H. Felt, '18, phone 619-M, or
to Joe Meade, '17E, in Prof. J. R. Al-
len's office, in the engineering build-
ing. Such applications can also be
made at the Michigan Union up to 12
o'clock today, although it is preferable
that they be made from the first two
men mentioned.
MENTOR CARDS READY TODAY
Fresh, Soph, and Junior Engineers to
Receive Grades This Afternoon
Mentor cards for freshmen, sopho-
more and junior engineers are now in
the hands of their mentors. So far
as their classes will allow, all mentors
will be in their offices from 4 to 5
o'clock this afternoon and students are
asked to see them at that time or at
their regular office hours before next
Wednesday.
Office hours of the mentors are
posted in both bulletin boards in the
second corridor. Cards which contain
no mentor's name have been turned
over to Prof. A. R. Bailey, who will
be in room 321 every afternoon from
1 to 5 o'clock.
KANSAS STUDENTS FORM NEW
CLUB IN MEETING AT UNION
Kansas students last night added
another organization to the list of sec-
tional clubs in the University, when
officers were elected at a preliminary
meeting at the Union. Thei following
men were chosen: President A. R.
Smith, '19M; vice-president, William R.
Palmer, '17-'19L; secretary and treas-
urer, N. D. Ireland, '18L.
The club has planned a smoker to
be held Nov. 28, and a dance will be
given n Kansas Day, Jan. 29. There
are about 50 students from the "Sun-
flower State" in the University, 31 of
which joined the club last night.
OHIO CLUB TO HOLD MEETING
TUESDAY TO ELECT OFFICERS
The first meeting of the Ohio club
will be held next Tuesday evening,
the place and time of meeting to be
announced at a later date. All mem-
bers of the organization are requested
to be present, as the election of officers

for the ensuing year and a general dis-
cussion of plans for the year will take
place.

CALIFORNIA AND MINNESOTA REMAIN DECIDING FACTORS IN FINAL
OUTCOME; OFFICIAL VOTE OF FORMER NOT EXPECTED
UNTIL LATE THIS AFTERNOON
HUGHES TAKES DOUBTFUL NEW HAMPSHIRE BY 161 VOTES
Both Parties Make Preparations for Protesting Illegalities of Voting by
Sending Lawyers, Detectives, and Inspectors to Closely
Contested States
(Special from the Detroit Free Press.)
Detroit, Nov. 9, 3 a. m.-Early morning reports showed that Wilson's
lead had been cut down in the remaining doubtful states to such an
amount that ardent Hughes supporters claimed his election to the presi-
dency by two electoral votes. The inpression remained that no oficial de-
cision could be reached before today.
Submission of matters to initiative and referendum and voting on lo-
cal questions was in part responsible for the delay of returns following
the election. This was the first case in 26 years that the citizens had to
wait over night to learn whom they had chosen as their chief executive.
Conditions on the leading doubtful states are as follows:

CHOOSE BAND MEN FOR TRIP
3 Men to Leave Tomorrow Niglit on
Special for Cornell
At 7 o'clock Friday night, the Varsity
Band, comprising 53 men, will board
the special train for Ithaca. This is
the largest band ever taken east. Last
year the organization numbered 42
men. A number of new uniforms have
been purchased, and the old ones have
been completely renovated, making the
band one of the most picturesque mu-
sical organizations of its kind in the
country.
Those who will make the trip are:
C. E. Zwickey, '17E, Phillip Carrol,
'18E, E. L. Hicks, '18, A. J. Burr, '20M,
L. H. Andrews, '18D, H. C. Koch, '19E,
E. F. Ruihley, '19A, V. G. Husted, '19E,
W. M. McKee, 18E, G. R. Baehr, '1%
L. J. Porter, '18D, M. C. Piatt, '18,
E. H. Wirth, '18P. M. A. Netter, '17E,
L. C. Cortright, '17, R. A. McIver, '19,
E. W. Cory, '18, A. Hammond, '17D, N.
A. Lange, grad., R. P. Cranson, '18D,
E. F. Merril, '20M, R. L. McCutcheon,
'19, M. R. Twiss, '18D, R: H. Halstead,
'18, D. C. Scroggie, '20M, S. J. Whit-
man, '18, C. C. Wolcott., '17M, H. J.
Thorburn, '18P, N. W. Eddy, 18E, M.
R. Cutting, '17E, T. B. Dimmick, '18,
M. B. Sprague, '17. C. W. Brainard,
'18M, C. A. Rebentisch. '18D, J. L.
Lundberg, '18D, L. G. Field, '17L, D. J.
Hillier, '18P, D. K. White, '19E. R. F.
Merner, '18L, C. Russel, grad., W. E.
Campbell, '19A, E. A. Wishropp, '19,
D. B. McMichael. '19, H. Gray, '17E,
L. R. Hatton, '18E, W. L. Breidenbach,
'17M, Eugene A. Osius, '19, K. P.
Jones, '19M, Hugo V. Prucha, '19, H.
G. Johnson, '18L; Captain Wilfred B.
Wilson, director, Fred B. Wahr, faculty
manager, and Walter R. Atlas, '18,
student manager.
Berths will be issued at the mass
meeting tonight in Hill auditorium. All
band members must be an hand by
7:15 o'clock, Friday evening. The band
will meet in front of University hall
at 6:30 o'clock. All baggage must
be ready at this time. A truck will
be secured to transport the instru-
ment cases and grips to the Michigan
Central station.
YOUNGSTOWN CLUB INITIATES
FIVE NEW MEN AT BANQUET
The annual initiation banquet of the
Youngstown club was held at the
Catalpa Inn last night. The now men
taken in were: F. C. Carew, '20E, W.
Foster, '20, H. S. Zeve, '20, C. V.
Cooney, '20, and P. E. Jerimiah, '20.
A short business meeting followed the
banquet.

ihi r sota: Wilson's plurality has
4cen reduced to 360, with nearly, 700
more precincts to be turned in. These
precincts lie in the rural districts, and
in the Scandanavian territory, which
are usually strongly Republican. Re-
publicans believe the state will sup-
port Hughes by a plurality of from
4000 to8,000.
California: The vote in California
appears now to rest upon the decision
reached in the southern part of the
state. Wilson's lead has been cut down
here from 4,900 at 4 o'clock Wednes-
day afternoon to 1,521 at 2:15 o'clock
this morning.
About 118 precincts remain to be
totaled for president in Los Angeles
city and county. The county clerk has
given notification that no further to-
taling will take place until 9 o'clock
this morning (11 o'clock Ann Arbor
time). There are over 1,000 precincts
still to be heard from and the con-
clusion is that there will be no of-
ficial report in the state until late to-
morrow afternoon.
New Mexico: Over 100 electoral
precincts have not been heard from.
These are situated along 'the border
and it is believed that tI1ey will be
for Hughes. Wilson still holds a ma- -
jority of 500.
New Hampshire: This state has of-
ficially announced it votes for Hughes,
with a plurality of 161. Both sides in-
tend to contest the count.
Delaware: Senator. Salsbury re-
ported to President Wilson a Demo-
cratic victory in this state by a plural-
ity of 200. Republicans, however, claim
it went for Hughes by 800.
Hughes needs 32 votes for election,
while Wilson will continue to hold his
office if he receive 10 more. Basing
their supposition upon the idea that
both California and Minnesota are of-
ficially declared for Hughes, the Re-
publican candidate will still need
seven votes to be elected.
Owing to the narrow margin of votes
in so many states, both parties have
.sent out inspectors, detectives and
lawyers to gather evidence on sup-
posedly illegal voting in New Hamp-
shire, New Jersey, Delaware, and West
Virginia.
By PERRY ARNOLD
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
New York, Nov. 8.-President Wilson
was making steady gains this after-
noon in two states, Minnesota and
California, carrying either of which
will make his election certain, regard-
ing these two as doubtful with New
Hampshire, New Mexico, and Oregon.
United Press returns showed Wilson
to have already acquired 256 votes in
electorial college; Hughes 238. The
President therefore requires only ten
votes for re-election.
j At Democratic headquarters the

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Note to Michigan Daily Sub-
scribers:
All local subscriptions to The
Nichigan Daily must be paid on
or before Friday, Nov. 10, or the
$3.00 rate will be charged.
Checks may be mailed or de-
livered in person to The Michi-
gan Daily offices, Press building,
Maynard street. - -

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