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November 08, 1916 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-08

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EXTRA

ELECTI

VOL. XXVII. ELECTION EXTRA. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENTS
5*
Il

Michigan

Goes

Dry

--Seeper

0,
Wt

Race

REPUBLICANS GET
STATE HEAiD1HOME
RULE IS REJECTED

President -elect Hughes

REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FORGES FAR I LEAD DURING
EARLY PART OF COUNT FOR PRESIDENTIAL OfflCE, BUT

LATEST REPORTS INDICATE DECIDED MLSON

GAINf

ELECTiON RCETURN S COME
FROM VARIO)US PRECINCTS
SLOWLY

IN

MIX-UP IN DETROIT VOTING
People Unable to Reach Polls By Nine
o'tlock Permitted Overtime
By Commission
Uetroft, ,li ih., Nov. S.--Prohli-
bition carried Michigan by a ma-
jority of at least 75,000, according
to a late wire report,
Detroit, Nov. 8.-Slow and scattered
returns from 23 counties, not includ-
ing the cities of Detroit and Grand
Rapids, indicate that Michigan is safely
Republican by majorities estimated at
between 50,000' and 100,000. Only
partial returns from the 287 voting
precincts of the city of Detroit were
available at 1 o'clock. The heavy vot-
ing added to a series of mix-ups in
the recording of the ballots have
swamped the election officials.
At 9 o'clock when the hour for the
closing of the polls arrived, thousands
of voters were still in line, and the
election commission ruled that these
men should be allowed to vote, and in
several precincts the balloting con-
tinued until 12 o'clock.
Prohibition on the face of the early
returns has carried by an overwhelm-
ing majority. In 23 counties incom-
plete, the vote was: Hughes, 37,401;
Wilson, 29,195. For governor, 21 coun-
ties, incomplete: Sleeper, Republican,
31,162; Sweet, Democratic, 22,918. For
United States senator, 17 counties, in-
complete: Townsend, Republican, 29,-
616; Price, Democratic, 19,507. For
prohibition, 22 counties, including
most of the wet strongholds outside
Detroit, give 28,932 against 20,900. The
home rule amendment providing for
local option was buried 22,833 to 13,-
93?.
Oddities From
.1916rElction

4 Killed in Boston Car Accident
Boston, Nov. 7.-Probable estimates
of the number of dead in the car ac-
cident on the Summer street extension
bridge late this afternoon was put at
4. Sixty-two pasengers are believed
to have been on the car when it
plunged from the bridge into Ft. Point
channel. Only six, including the mo-
torinan and conductor, are known to
have been rescued. The motorman has
been arrested.
C6ITY GOES DRY BY
A LARGE MAJORITY
ilonie Ule Amendment Defeaited in
Ann Arbor and County; Sleep-
er Easy Winner
LI N IENSCIIMiTT VICTORIOUS
Ann Arbor went dry, By an over-
wheIming majority the voters decided
that the saloon must go. The "Home
Rule" amendment was swamped. With
only three of the 20 townships of the
county to be heard from at 2 o'clock
this morning, the returns showed that
in every township the wets' pet amend-
ment was hopelessly, finally, and con-
vincingly defeated. Ypsilanti went dry
by a majority of 762. The county will
register a majority of 3,000 for the
drys.
The election throughout the county
was a Republican landslide. Hughes
won out in the city and was conceded
an 800 majority for the total vote of
the county. Sleeper for governor, was
an easy winner in most of the wards
and townships.
The most interest was in the returns
for the county offices. The office of
sheriff, which was perhaps the most
hotly contested for, was won by Her-
man G. Lindenschmitt, the present in-
cumbent, with a majority of over 1,000,
Only in four county offices did the
Democrats of Washtenaw county have
any chance of winning out. Leland

WITH EXCEPTION OF EVENING PO ST, ALL NEW YORK NEWSPAPERS
DECLARE EX-GOVERNO , OF STATE ELECTED
TO WHITE HO USE OFFICE
REPUBLICAN CHAIRMAN WILCOX CLAIMS 306 ELECTORAL VOTES
Balance of Power in Next Senate and lious, of Representatives Swinging
at 1 O'clock With Re ult o' Presidential
Elec ,toen.t
While the result of the election is still in doubt, Hughes seems cer-
tain of winning by an extremely small margin. When election returns be-
gan to roll in from all parts of the country, the Republican candidate built
up a huge lead,, which practically assured his supporters of what seemed
an easy victory.
With the later returns, however, Wilson votes began to appear In
greater numbers, until-at last he crept up rapidly upon nls rival. For a
time early this morning it seemed as though the Democratic candidate
would nose out his opponent, but wi h the 'inal division of doubtful states
Charles Evans Hughes seems certain of the election.
BY PERRY ARNOLD
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
New York, Nov. 8.-A deadlock of claims from Republican and Demo-
cratic parties prevails. A strong trend towards Hughes was apparently
cut down by a late swing toward Wilson. This was the situation in thei
twenty-ninth national election at 3 o'clock this morning. National Chairman
Vance McCormack set "not less than 273 electoral votes for Wilson as his
prediction of the outcome."
National Republican Chairman Wilcox increased his earlier statement
claiming 306 for Hughes. In the first hour after midnight preliminary
indications were that California, claim'°d by both parties, would go Repub-
lican. Delaware probably for Wnl ,i Wisconsin probably for Hughes.
Since midnight Chairman Mcci ack has been assured that Dela-
ware was carried by a safe plurality for the president, and the entire
Democratic state ticket, including United States senator.
With one exception all the New York newspapers at 1 o'clock this
morning declared ex-Governor Hughes elected. The exception was the
Evening Post, which in a midnight extra merely stated "the election of
Hughes seems probable."
The Morning World conceded Hughes elected but gave him only 263
electoral votes with several states still doubtful, the Tribune gives the
Republican candidate 291 votes and the Son 310. The vote necessary to
elect is 266. The Tribune gave Wilson 199 electoral votes and the Sun 149.
1 ____________

Charles Evans Hughes was born in
Glen Falls, N. Y., April 11, 1862. His
father, David Charles Hughes, a Bap-
tist clergyman, was of Welsh descent,
while his mother, Mary Catherine Cdn-

Gerold Valley, W. Va., Nov. Tk- r'
W. Byrd Hunter voted here today after
traveling 5,000 miles, he said, to vote
for Wilson. Dr. Hunter is stationed
at the bureau of fisheries on Seal Is-
land,. Alaska.
Warsaw, "nd., Nov. 7.-"Billy" Sun.
day was so busy campaigning in Michi-
gan against saloons that he lost his
own chance to vote. He returned home
today intending to vote, having sent in
his registration by mail, but the let-
ter was delayed and his registry was
declared void.
Rochester, N. Y., Nov. 7.-Jobn S.
Wilson, 101 years old, voted here to-
day for Charles E. Hughes. He vis-
ited the polls early, declining the as-
sistance cf friends, and cast his bal-
lot on the modern voting machine.
Boston, Nov. 7.-Seventeen of the
21 enfranichised Chinamen in Boston
voted the straight Democratic ticket
early today, according to John L, Don-
ovan, who controls the Old Cove sec-
tion of the city.
Hastings, Neb., Nov. 7#-Silas R.
Barton, Republican candidate for con-
gressman in the Fifth Nebraska dis-
trict, died today in Grand Island of
acute pneumonia contracted while ad-
dressing an open air meeting last

nelly, was of Irish, Dutch, and Eng-
lish extraction. Because the elder,
Hughes preferred answering the call1
whither the spirit led, rather thant
seeking the pulpits having the great-
est remuneration attached, the familyl
was never in flourishing financial cir-
cumstances. Yet despite this, every
provision was mae to endow Charles
Evans with 4n education such as few'
men of his day were fortunate enough
to possess.
He received his early training in the7
schools of Oswego, Newark, and in the
city of New York, entering Madison
(now Colgate) University in 1876, and
receiving his A, B. degree at Brown
University in 1881. Although only 19
years of age, he graduated with the
highest possible honors.
Takes Place as Teacher.
Following the graduation of Hughes
from Brown, he taught Greek and
mathematics in the Delaware Acad-
emy of Delhi, N. Y. At the end of
the year 1882 he went to the city of
New York, where he accepted a posi-
tion in a law office, meanwhile at-
tending the Columbia School of Law,
from which he graduated in 1-887 with
more honors and prize fellowships.
One year later he married Antoinette
Carter, daughter of the head of the

firm by which he had been employed.
For seven years following, he practiced
law in New York, finally going to Cor-
nell as professor of law and special
lecturer, where he resided until 1895.
First Public Appearance in 1905.
Hughes' first appearance- in public
life came in 1905 when he was em-
ploy as counsel in the Stevens Gas,
and -:Armstrong Insurance commis-
sions, His handling of these two now
famous cases caused him to be ap-
pointed assistant to the United States
attorney-general in the equally fa-
mous coal investigation of 1906. He
was nominated for the mayorality of
New York City by the Republican
party, but fancying that the nomina-
tion was in the nature of a bribe, and 1
might interfere with his activities for
the public good, he declined the nom-
ination,
Elected New York Governor.
He was elected to the office of gov-
ernor, taking his seat Jan. 1. 1;.07,
and was re-elected in 1909, but re-
signed his position in October, 1910. In
May of the same year, he had received
the appointment of associate justice
of the supreme court, taking his seat
immediately after his resignation as
governor.
Mr. Hughes is a fellow of Brown
University, a trustee of the University
of Chicago, and member of the Amer-
ican Bar association, and of the bar
associations of the city and state of
New York. He is also a member of
the Delta Upsilon fraternity.

and Murray, running for judge of pro-
bate, Cruner and Feldkamp, for treas-
urer, and Wright and Lehman, for
prosecuting attorney, all were running
close races. At a late hour last night,
Republicans conceded the Democrats
two of these offices.
All of the other county offices will
fall to the Republicans. Mark R. Ba-
con, running for representative in con-
gress, second district, decisively de- .
feated Samuel W. Beakes, Democrat,
who was up for re-election.
Burchfield, a Republican, and Ken-
nedy, Democrat, will retaIn their of-
fices as coroners. Smith, for county
clerk, ran a close race with Beck but
was an assured winner as the strong
Republican wards and townships be-
gan to send in their returns. I
The court room of the county build-
ing was crowded all evening by inter-
ested voters of the city and nearby
farms. Republicans were evidently in
the majority. Candidates of both part-
ies hung eagerly upon the words of
the announcer and feverishly debated
their chances as the returns of the
war'ds of the city and the townships
came in. It was a good natured crowd
and candidates were bandied and
cheered as the tide of the election
was announced.

DEMOCRATIC CAMPAIGN COST
$1,850,000, SAYS MORGENTHAU
New York, Nov. 7.-Henry Morgen-;
thau, chairman of the finance commit-
tee of the Democratic national com-
mittee, said today the campaign had
cost the party over $1,850,000, and that
today found the ,committee with a
deficit of $200,000. This amount he
was confident would be raised and all
obligations discharged, regardless of,
how the election ewent.
Morgenthan tonight banqueted those
who contributed $5,000 or more to the
Democratic fund. Among those are
Secretary of State Lansing and Mrs.
Lansing, Secretary of the Treasury
McAdoo, Secretary of Commerce Red-
field.
Michigan Soldiers Disenfranchised
Lansing, Nov. 7.--Approximately
3,000 Michigan militiamen in service
on the Mexican border were disen-
franchised today as a result of a rul-
ing by Attorney General Grant Fel-
lows, that the Michigan law contained
no provision for their voting. Despite
the ruling, election officials of St. Clair
and Houghton counties forwarded bal-
lots to the guardsmen from those coun-
ties, and will accept their votes unless
prevented from so doing by legal re-
straint.
Retires Without Knowing Results
New York, Nov. 8.-At 1:15 o'clock
ex-Governor Hughes sent out for a
sandwich. and announced that after
eating it he was going to bed.

New York, Nov. 8.-Shortly after
midnight the Republican national com-
mittee issued the following list, as-
serting Hughes has been chosen by
284 electoral votes. The list follows:
California, Connecticut, Delaware,
Idaho, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Maine,
laryland, Massachusetts, Michigan,
New Hampshire, New Jersey, New
York, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsyl-
vania, Rhode Island, South Dakota,
Vermont, Washington, West Virginia,
and Wisconsin.
States conceded to Wilson in addi-
tion to the solid south:
Colorado, Kentucky, Missouri, Ne-
braska, Oklahoma, Tennessee. Total
electoral votes, 77. With the solid
south, 126 votes, this would allow
Wilson a total of 203.
New York, Nov. 8.-At midnight the
Democrats claimed Wilson's election
by not less than 266 electoral votes.
The statement of states claimed for
Wilson was as follows:
Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Cali-
fornia, Colorado, Delaware, Florida,
Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky,
Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Mis-
souri. Montana, Nebraska, Nevada,
New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio,
Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah,
Virginia, Washington, West Virginia,
Wisconsin, Wyoming and South Caro-
lina.
The committee added that Wilson
would win without Wisconsin and In-
diana. his total in that event,-being
268.
New York, -Nov.- 8.-The balance of
power in the next senate and house of

Drys Win Three States Out of Firer
Up to the time of going to press
only two states in addition to Mich-
igan had declared for prohibition. The
drys won in Arkansas' by a 10,000
plurality while the totals in South
Dakota had not been finally estimated.
Two southern states, Missouri and
Maryland, declared for saloons, the
plurality in Maryland being estimated
at more than 10,000..

Redman Governor of Rhode Island
Late reports show that Bedman was
elected, governor of Rhode Island and'
Whitman chosen head of New York
state. A Republican majority in con-
gress was also predicted late this
evening. Two stotes saw defeat of
prohibition: Maryland- and Missouri.
In South Dakota, however, prohibi-
tion sweep the state.

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