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October 03, 1916 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LUUINL HUMLH IU
51SNG OCTO.BER 12

'y 0

7I

Celebrated Contralto Will Appear in
Initial Concert Given in Hill
Auditorium

Tuesday morning Block "B" at $3.50,
and on Wednesday morning Block
"C" at $3.00 will be placed on sale,
while tickets for single concerts may
be purchased Wednesday afternoon at
$1.00, $1.50, and $2.00 each. Course
tickets for Block "A"-"B"-"C" will
contain a cover coupon to the value
of $3.00 each when exchanged for a
May Festival ticket. Mail orders for
$6.00 tickets ("Patrons' Tickets") will
be filled immediately after those who
come in person have been waited up-
on, while Mail Orders for other tickets
will be filled in their order of receipt
from special mail order sections.
1916 WOLVERINE ADDs
NUMEROUS INNOVATIONS

ci-LJI- I

our

Depositors

Find Our

I U.MS, SECURES LONE RECITAL1

S

ERVICE

TSY

EE

TED IN THE
A MICHIGAN

)d the require-

ly the needs
an students.

The initial concert of the Univer-
sity Musical Society will be given in
Hill auditorium Thursday evening,
October 12, at which time Madame
Louise Homer, one of the world's most
distinguished contraltos, and for
years one of the greatest drawing
cards at the Metropolitan Opera House
will appear. This fall she will give
but one song recital and through a
fortunate combination of circum-
stances the Ann Arbor management
was able to secure this date.
On November 8, the second number
will be given by Fritz Kreisler, the
eminent Austrian violinist who ranks
as one of the foremost exponents of
his art in the world. During the early
days of the war he served in the Aus-
trian army as an officer and after be-
ing severely wounded was discharged
and resumed his work in music.
On December 12, Ossip Gabrilo-
vitsch, the Russian pianist, long rec-
ognized as the successor of Rubin-
stein, will be heard. Like Kreisler,
he stands among the leaders. When
he was last heard in Ann Arbor six
years ago he made a wonderful im-
pression and there has been a great
demand since thtrtime forehisareturn
appearance.,
On January 26, Dr. Karl Muck will
bring his wonderful Boston Symph-
ony Orchestra consisting of nearly 100
artists to Ann Arbor. This organi-
zation was last heard in 1912 in Hill
auditorium at which time every avail-
able inch was occupied and hundreds
were turned away.
The Pre-Festival series will be
brought to a close by a joint recital
by Harold Bauer, pianist, and Pablo
Casals, the well-known Spanish 'cellist.
This concert will also prove a most
fitting forerunner to the May Festival
to follow later. Both are artists of
high rank and their joint appearances
have been features of the musical
world.
The Festival as usual will consist of
six concerts given during four days in
May. The University Choral Union
and a Special Chorus of several hun-
dred school children under the direc-
tion of Dr. Stanley and the Chicago
Symphony Orchestra under Frederick
Stock, will furnish the musical back-
ground, while a large number of the
world's leading artists will take part
in the different programs. The Choral
Union will appear in Elgar's "Dream
of Gerontius" and Verdi's "Aida"
which will be given with an all star
cast of soloists. The Children's
Chorus will again be heard in the
"Walrus and the Carpenter" which
was so well received at the first ap-
pearance of the children four years
ago.
The public sales of course reserved
seat tickets will begin Saturday morn-
ing, October 7, at the box office in Hill
auditorium. On this date choice of
reserved seats in the house will be
offered at $6.00 each. These tickets
may be reserved for the May Festival
provided the "cover coupon" attached
thereto is returned on Saturday morn-
ing, March 3, and a further payment
of $4.00 made.
On Monday morning, March 9,
Block "A" consisting of all remaining
seats on the first floor and the first
six rows in the First Balcony will be
placed on sale at $4.00 each. On

e a success of it.

Un surpasscd

appreciat-

The Wolverine, Michigan's summer
school newspaper, finished a success-
ful term August 24, and left on record
a number of innovations, including
foreign and city news, and a series
of Saturday supplements. The edi-
tors, Verne E. Burnett, '17, and C.
Verne Sellers, '17, (business manager)
were assisted by a staff of more than
twenty-five students, comprising the
largest and most experienced staff of
any Wolverine on record.
The extras were published during
Commencement week. The supple-
ments included one on the Shakes-
pearean tercentenary, on the Michigan
menat Plattsburg and the Mexican
border, on the buildings proposed or
now going up at Michigan,, on the
football teams, and numerous others.
A series of anonymous articles by men
high in the leadership of Michigan
opinion were also among the innova-
tions, which marked the summer's
run.
The work was aided by Prof. Lee A
White, now acting as head of the jour-
nalism department at the University
of Washington. Irwin C. Johnson, '16,
and Waldo R. Hunt, '16, sent reports
to The Wolverine from Europe. Five
women students worked throughout
the summer on the publication, thus
breaking all records for the number
of women workers on a student publi-
cation throughout a term. Credit was
for the first .time:given by the sum-
mer session for work on the summer
paper.
Walter R. Atlas, '18, and Bruce A.
Swaney, '18, acted as news editors.
Tom C. Reid, '17, Ralph Folz, '17, and
Phil C. Pack, '18, were associate edi-
tors. Marian Wilson, '18, was wom-
an's editor, and H. C. Garrison, '17,
was sports editor.
SOUTHERN SOLDIERS LIGHT
SAY RECRUFFING OFFICERS
Washington, Oct. 3.-The average
weight of men south of the Mason and
Dixon line is from four to six pounds
lighter than the average weight of men
north of it, say United States Marine
Corps recruiting officers operating
there, in a report received at Marine
Corps headquarters today. These re-
cruiting officers have asked that the
minimum weight for recruits in the
south be reduced from 124 to 120
pounds, stripped.
"The large raw-boned Southerner"
is seldom seen, the recruiting officers
aver, and, while the men of the south
are as sound and fit as the men of any
other section, they are usually small-
boned and light in weight. The offi-
cers point out in their recommendation
that some of the best "hikers" and
fighters in the Marine Corps are the
lean, wiry men from the southland.

forty-seven years'
iess experience

success.

The excellence of this SERVICE is proven by the con-
tinuous growth of our resources.

Foreign and City News, Saturday Sup-
plements, and Special Articles
Mark Career

The SERVICE is always available to you.
No Savings Account too large; none to small.

11

Ann Arbor Savings Bank
INCORPORATED 1869

It is the outgrowth of

Main office, Northwest corner Main and Huron Branch office,
RESOURCES $3,8001,000.00

0zo N.> Univ. Ave.,

will still find the
rvice and goods

bus-
and

BEE.

O
' r 52
e52fee~a" ~
ge5's2
52
REGITERD INU SPAT FF 9O~ Y E V PICE&cC
QuaityFirt!

'HIEF THOUGHT OF THE
ZD, LONG WINTER TO COME
ngton, N. J., Oct. 3.-When
entered his hen roost recently
le all- but four of his fine flock,
McAvoy, a retired sergeant of
ted States Marine Corps, who
s a chicken farm near here,
a bill on his front gate defying
f to come back sometime and
four he had "inadvertently
ked." .
night the thief, or thieves, car-
the quartette, of hens that had
ft behind on the initial excur-

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TAWkWA
WE HAVE IT.

Your real motive in making a clothes purchase is to
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A .t .s'
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Have just received a new shipment of Lino-
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Have us measure you Today.

for the windows and Drapperies for the doors. Our
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for correct styles. Many customers find our prices
these goods to be lower than they expected.
Stanger Furniture Co.
117-118 W. LIBERTY ST.

F.i W.

Gross

309 S. Main St.
814 S. State St.

Local Dealer of Ed. V. Price & Co.

Merchant Tailors, Chicago

4

.,

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