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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 07, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

[ICHIGAN DA

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t

G. H. Wild Co.
Leading Merchant Tailors
State St.

i

1

in

SH]EET MUSIC
We always have the latest
Popular and Classical #r -
MENDINGER MUSIC SHOP
122 B. Liberty St.
111IDIIIIIIIIDII IIDiIIIDlll I I IItI IlI IIIIIDD111 IIDIIII Ii 11DD1111 1;lilill9

ALLIV
Phone 1692

I SGAN DAL
Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan. Publied every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $2.5s; b mail, $3.0o.
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup.
ply Store ; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 24r4.
Communications not to exceed 30o words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box is tho west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker.........,Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn...... ......... .City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald......*.;Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Verne E. Burnett...........Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg.............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade.........Statistical Editor
J. E. Campbell... Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Enery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne..Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau... Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter... Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
L. S. Thompson E. A. Baumgarth
L. W. Nieter J. L. Stadeker
Reporters'
B. A. Swaney C. W. Neumann
W. R. Atlas C. C. Andrews
E. L. Zeigler H. C. Garrison
Allen Schoenfield C. M. Jickling
Marian Wilson D. S. Rood
Business Staff
Bernard Wohl J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
E. Reed Hunt Harold J. Lance
Earl F. Ganschow Walter R. Payne
Harold Makinson
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1916.
Night Editor-B. A. Swaney.
Night editors only meet at 12:40 to-
day.

That is the telephone number.
Call any time between the hours
of3and 6 P. M. daily or between
9 and 12 A. M. Saturday when
you desire student help-"Y"
Employment Dept.

i

823,

B V Y YOVR I

DESPITE WAR PRICES
Our slightly-soiled
novels, even the latest,
must . sell at 50c.
E.YT-
WAHRV',Sa
UNIVERSBITY 1BOOKSTORES

L A V N D Y

C A SE

A T

SlaterBook hp at.

.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
etween Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
ars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
1local time.
etroit Limited and Express Cars- 8:io a
nd hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:10 p. m.
alanazoo Limited Cars-8 :48 a. in. and
.y two hours to 6 :48 p. in.; to Lansing,
aoson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Arbor)--9:48 a. in. and every two hours
x:48 p. M.
ecal Cars Eastbound-5:s5 a. m, 6:40 a.
7:o a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
8:05 p. in., 9:05 P. mi., 10:50 p. m. to
Oaati only, 9:2o a. in., 9:50 a. m., 2:o5 p.
6 :o5, p. mn., 11 :45 P. nm., r :io a. m., i:2
n. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
ecal Cars Westbund-6:o5 a. mn., 7:5o a.
ro0:2o p. in.. '12:20 a. im.
e Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
venient and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
Pleased With Our Service. Two Offices
-105 S. Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
rYPEWHITERS of all makes
Sale or Rent. Cleaning &
Repairing~ TYPEWVRITING &
MEOEGRAPHING. SUPPLIES
4. DMorr111

We Offer You
SECURITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION

Varied Subjects
A ttract Kreisler
Austrian Viollaist it Student of Law,
Medicine, Painting, Music,
and Military Tactics
Few musicians have the varied in-
terests of Fritz Kreisler, the famous
Austrian violinist, who will appear in
Hill auditorium tomorrow evening at
S o'clock. He has studied medicine
and law, and is a painter of no mean
ability, having given a year of his life
to the study of painting in Paris. He
is a graduate of a military school in
Austria, and as an officer in the Third
Jaeger Regiment of Granz he served
with gallantry and distinction in the
campaign near Lemberg in 1914 until

Resources $3,800,000

Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Office--
707 North University Ave.
GIRLSI buy tickets at Beauty Shop and
save $1.50 on $5.oo. Souvenir with
every Soc purchase of cosmetics.

W~HEN a dog bites me once,
I m through with it. Same
way with a tobacco. .
VELVET is aged in the
wood for two years to
make it the .smoothest
smoking tobacco.
Home Made Candies
Strictly fresh and of the best quality. Pure cream walnut caramels, as-
sorted nut chocolates in fib. boxes, 35c. Bitter sweet and chocolate creams
all fresh. Special ice cream sundaes.
--
State St. Cor. Libety
iillIl111 i11111111 111111 11l1 llllli1llll tlIlllllllll i illIllllllli lI III ll11 ll lllltl
mein
Qom isiinssisiiissississsississssissinsleis
LAN DERS
11JIl ;~uO R '
Ilf213 F.LOWERS
1 218 E. Liberty St. Phone 284
Another reminder not to forget us when in need of Flowers for any
1 Ocoasion. Roses, Violets, Sweet Peas, Orchids, Carnations, Chrysan- '
themums and Potted Plants. Corsage Work a Specialty.
Member Florist Telegraph Delivery Service.

he was severely wounded.

His ser-I

S. State

582-J

GEORGE BISCHOFF
FLOR IST
Choice Cut Flowevs and Plants
120 Chapin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.
PHONE 809 M
STOP AT
TUCTTLE'S
338 S. STATE
for sodas and lunches

Miss Mable Rowe 1
503 First National Bank Bldg. Phone 2402
FIRST NATL. BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $ioo,ooo Surplus and Profit $65,000
DIRECTORS
Wirt Cornwell Waldo M. Abbott
Geo. W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
Fred Schmid D. B. Sutton
E. D. Kinnie
r",
THE SUGAR BOWL
109 S. Main St.
SPECIAL SUNDAES
LIGHT LUNCHES
Our candies are made in
our own sanitary shop.

' Jlll ! I fj s l i f I i 3

4 jFl [Fh,, f
b
2 "R
1 , .
"Y....R:A !'
' e smn ' 0.
'NONi'

O GET the best
results in tele-
phoning, speak
directly into the
transmitter with
the lips in front of
but not touching it.
Speak distinctly in
a moderate tone.

WHO W1ILL FOLLOW OMEGA PHI?
Campus organizations at Michigan
have sprung up like weeds in fertile
soil. Some of these organizations have
more than justified their right to ex-
ist by their contributions to the pro-
gress of the University. They are the
strong plants in our garden. Then
there are the weeds. These are the
superfluous societies, which lead a
parasite existence, sapping the vitality
of their stronger and more valuable
contemporaries. Until the members of
these weaker organizations become
imbued with a self-sacrificing spirit,
and decide to terminate the societies
for the betterment of the University,
this condition will inevitably exist.
Omega Phi, women's literary and
sociological society, passed quietly out
of existence last week. In bringing
the society to an end its members pub-
licly acknowledged their discovery
that the society was superfluous. In
so doing they indicated a remedial
program which might well be followed
by a number of other societies on the
campus.
The action of Omega Phi is laudable
at this time because a termination of
its activities leaves its members free
to give their individual attention to
other worthy causes, instead of claim-
ing their waning interest and sup-
port while the society was dying a
lingering and perhaps inevitable
death. After ten years on the campus,
Omega Phi retires in favor of Stylus,
and frankly confesses its reasons for
doing so.
Other campus societies should turn
the searching light of inquiry upon
their own aims and achievements to
determine whether they are not in a
position similar to that of Omega Phi.
CARRANZA MAY PROHIBIT
IMPORTATION OF ARTICLES
Juarez, Nov. 6.--A new scale of
duties upon exports into Mexico was
in effect today under a decree issued
by the first chief, Carranza. Duties
on many staples, including food and
clothing, have been raised to almost
prohibitive figures, and it was pre-
dicted that importation of some
articles would be stopped altogether.
The duty on oats, of which large quan-
tities are being shipped to the Ameri-
can expedition, has been raised to
$7.50 per ton. Wheat, corn, and hay,
however, are free.
Reports Co-operate Stores Lower Price
Washington, Nov. 6.-Endorsement
of the co-operative stores system as
"tending to bring about lower prices
and better returns to the farmer" was
made today by the United States bu-
reau of markets. A survey by the bu-
reau of 60 co-operative stores in vari-
ous sections of the country shows that
the system "has very great possibil-
ities in this country."
The finest Floral Shop in the city
will open soon in the Nickels Aroade,
State Street. 3-tf

vice won him promotion and a medal.
Mr. Kreisler is also an accomplished
linguist speaking French, Italian,
English and Russian in addition to his
native German.
Musically he is, of course, one of the
greatest violinists of our time but he
is only less great as a pianist and Har-
old Bauer has said that if Kreisler
would devote a year to the piano, he
would rank among the foremost pian-
ists of the world. In composition
Kreisler has not done much but he has
arranged a vast amount of music for
his instrument and may be regarded
as the discoverer of that wonderful
literature for the violin that the seven-
teenth and eighteenth century Italian
composers wrote in such quantities.
In his researches aflong the buried
music of the past he brought to light
and arranged many short pieces of ex-
quisite beauty which have appealed
strongly to his hearers. His programs
are said to cover a broader field than
those of any artist now before the pub-
lie.
Smallpox flakes
Mruse frelodize
Bring from its dusty hiding place the
battered old guitar, and let us sing
a song or two the Sabbath gloom to
mar. We cannot go to Ypsi for con-
tagion is rampant, so let us get togeth-
er and some quaint old scandals chant.
The pretty little school marms (it's
a tale that vastly grieves) have had
to seek the doctor and to hoist their
several sleeves. All over now is Eros'
rule and scenes of osculation. Hip-
pocrates holds center stage with scenes
of vaccination.'
And it is said the knock-down ' cons"
upon the D. U. R. are stony broke'
from running on a semi-empty car.
And loud and most disconsolate is
Ypsilanti's wail. We send our deepest
sympathy-but by the U. S. mail.
Perhaps the darlings rave and weep.
Perhaps they rend their locks. Per-
haps they're sighing for us, but-per-
haps they have smallpox. We like
their ways, we like their smiles, we
like their coyest glances, but in a
case of quarantine there's no use tak-
ing chances.
So put the newest record on the
long-used Victrola, and let us drown
our sorrows in a drink of something-
cola. Or let us try a game of cards,
or rough-house o'er the room. But
let us try with all our might to quell
this Sabbath gloom.
Toledo Man Fined $13.45 for Speeding
A. N. Bacon, of Toledo, was ar-
rested Sunday afternoon for speeding
on South Main street. He was fined
$10 and $3.45 costs by Justice William
G. Doty. Officer, Emil Sodt made the
arrest.
Our ala,rm clocks are good clocks.
Chapman, Jeweler, 118 South Main
street. tues-sod
For results advertise in The Michi-
gan Daily.

BRITISH SHIP UNDER U. S. FLAG
SINKS U-BOAT, BERLIN SAYS
Berlin, Nov. 6.-Flying the Ameri-
can flag, a 'British steamer sank the
German submarine U-41 near the
Scilly islands, and imposed inhuian
treatment on two German officers who
miraculously escaped death, the semi-
official news agency reported today.
The attack occurred on Sept. 24, 1915,
but the news reached Berlin only
when one of the German officers who
was badly wounded was sent by the
British to Switzerland, where he is
now interned.
The U-41 ordered the steamer to
halt. The order was obeyed, but as
the submarine approached to within
300 yards the steamer's rail suddenly
fell away at two places and guns
opened fire on the U-boat, while the
American flag was still flying.
Milners to Adopt Military Designs
New York, Nov. 6.-To please Ameri-
can women who demand hats in har-
mony with the patriotic spirit of the
time, leading milliners of this city are
following the military mode in creat-
ing a design suitable for winter wear.
The chic steel helmet effect, turbans
and pompons, reminiscent of the
trenches and worn by many fashion-
able women, are to be superseded by
the more utilitarian Texan sombrero
in a smaller design, close resembling
the campaign hat of the United States
marine.
In the effort of New York designers
to establish a distinctively American
style devoid of foreign suggestion, the
head gear of the composite soldier and
sailor has proved a desirable model.
Prof. W. R. Humphreys Gives Lecture
At a meeting of the Michigan ass9-
ciation of English Teachers held in
Grand Rapids last Friday afternoon,
Prof. W. R. Humphreys, of the English
department, delivered an address on
"The Use of the English Bible in High
Schools."
Prof. J. R. Brumm accepted a re-
election to the presidency of the organ-
ization.
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. 18-tf

Wt~omen__
Stylus will meet at 7:30 this evening
with Elizabeth Toof, grad., at 202 South
Thayer street.
Judiciary council will meet at 12
o'clock Wednesday at the Little Shop.
Dean Myra B. Jordan will be at
home to college women from 3:30 to
6 o'clock Tuesday afternoons, at 1215
Hill street.
Hygiene lecture for all freshmen
and sophomores who have not taken
the course, will begin'at 5 o'clock in
the west amphitheater of the medical
building.
There will be a sophomore-junior
hockey game at 3 o'clock Wednesday
afternoon. Freshmen and seniors will
play at 2 o'clock, Saturday, Nov. 11.
Junior and senior hockey teams will
hold an important practice at 4 o'clock
this afternoon.
Girls wishing to play basketball.
should sign up at once.
Girls intending to be athletic squad
leaders should see Miss Evans at once.
Glee club will rehearse at 5 o'clock
this afternoon in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall.
PROF. J. R. BRUM STARTS
SERIES OF TALKS TO MEN
Prof. J. R. Brumm, of the rhetoric
department, gave the first of a series
of six talks before the young men's
class of the Methodist church Sunday
morning. Seventy young men heard
Professor Brumm's talk upon the sub-
ject of "Becoming College-Bred."
Professor Brumm's talks, aiming to
answer current problems with regard
to religious work, will be continued
each Sunday, at noon, until Dec. 3.
Next Sunday he will speak on "Defic-
iencies in Culture."

Sl

Takes Pictures
Develops Films
inakes Prints
and Ealarge-
713 E. Unvweiraty

Michigan

State Telephone
J. J. Kely, Manager
Telephone 500

Comp~ny

hiss Walton Gives T. B. C. Lecture
Miss Carol Walton, state secretary
f the Michigan anti-tuberculosis asso-
lation, spoke yesterday afternoon in
ansing before the Ingham county
urses convention on "Correct Meth-
ds in Tuberculosis Campaigns." From
lansing she will go to Howell, Mich.;
a the interest of the Red Cross seal
rork in that vicinity.

oa. W e Eger(Spats heon City Health
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city health of-
ficer, spoke to the social service class,
at noon, last Sunday in the Congrega-
tional church. lie talked on the work
of his department, laying stress on the
sewage, drainage and garbage pro-
blems.
Fox-trot ball at Armory Friday night.
7,8

If its artistic wall paper you
go to C. H. Major & Co. Phone 23

n-

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