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November 05, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH E MICHIGAN DAILY ,.UN

THOMAS DIXON'S
"The Fall of a Nation"
Starring LORRALNE HULING and PEILCY STANDING
Shows at 3:00, 6:00 and 8:45
MATINEE 25c EVENING 35c

MONDAY

and
TVESDAY
November 6-7

i

York a captured city, the puny frag-
ments of the small American army
driven into the inaccessible regions
of the Far West; the American women
banded in the oath-bound order of the
Daughters of Jael against the invader;
the wild rides of the women patriots
and their male colleagues; the recap-
ture of forts, wireless stations and
ships by the patriotic conspirators;

THE RECOVERY OF AMERICA, but
at the fearful price of our Unprepar-
edness folly; Loss of myriad lives, of
billions of treasure, and of our pride
in an untarnished Republic.
The New York Evening Sun re-
marks that "it takes a stirring pic-
ture to make us cheer our own de-
struction, but this picture does it"-
with of course enormously increased

enthusiasm at the very end over
America's final victory.
Were you thrilled by "The Birth of
a Nation?" Then you realize Thomas
Dixon's mastery of spectacular appeal,
his ability to play the gamut of human
emotion, and "The Fall of a Nation,"
the sequel to the earlier work by this
same author, will interest and satisfy
you as "The Birth of a Nation" did.

U - U B

n ntercolclfate
Harvard: A brief service was held
yesterday afternoon in commemora-
tion of the Harvard men who have
lost their lives in the European war
and those who are still engaged in
the conflict.
Iowa: The house club which is limit.
ed to negro students is third in rank
on the scholarship chart.
Purdue: A course of 16 lectures on
practical advertising has been put
into the curriculum.
Kansas: There is no longer any ex.
cuse for tardiness to classes for the
University has at its own expense
installed a jitney service and a de-
crease of 50 percent in lateness is
already noted.
Oregon: There are 24 students "batch-
ing" in the university this year, and
they like it so well that they have
formed a bachelors' club and will
do some co-operative buying.
been conducting in co-operation with
the state inspectors the past month.
The subjects of water, sewerage, and
drainage, garbage and refuse, disposal
of dead, prevention of epidemics, milk
supply and other kindred topics will be
taken up in the course of his address.
This is the fifth address of the 23
which will be given during the year be-
fore the social service class conducted
by Ray E. Bassett, each lecture dealing
to some extent with the general topic
of "City Planning."
The addresses will be given by city
officials, university men and to some
extent by out-of-town speakers.
Each lecture begins promptly at
noon, and are open to the general pub-
lic. The addresses never consume
more than an hour, the class always
being dismissed before one o'clock.

Washington:

A tag day for the ben-

efit of the band was held on the cam-
pus this week. The tags bore the
words "Send the Band South."
Illinois: The women met this week
to form the first Girls' Glee club in
the University. The new organiza-
tion begins with a membership of 27.
-. A. C.: Students who wish to go
home to vote have been granted the
necessary leave of absence. This is
the first time in the history of the
college that this permission has
been granted.

Cornell: Over 3,000 graduates have
contributed to the general alumni
fund which has almost reached the
$100,000 mark. The money is to be
used for increasing the salaries of
professors and teachers, and the re-
mainder will go toward the construc-
tion of Founders' hall.
Purdue: The Pageant, woven around
the story of the founding of the Uni-
versity by John Purdue, was present-
ed this week before an audience
which filled every seat in Stuart
field.

3...

Week Nov. 6
Nights
25C tO $2.00

GARRICK
DETROIT

Pop., Mat. Wed.
Best Seats $x.oo.
Sat. Mat. 25c
to $x.so.

The GCarrick Company
(Miss Bontelle, Director)
PRESENTS
TLU -
IN HIS NEW YORK SUCCESS
"A KING OF NOWHERE"
By J. and L. DuRocher Macpherson
"The part is replete with mysticism, and Telegen who is an artist,
plays it in a thoroughly imaginative manner."-Baltimore Evening Sun.
"The audience laughed heartily and applauded even more boister-
ously."-New York Herald.
"Lou-Tellegen presents a striking figure in the romantic role of
hero."-Boston Post.

ROMANCE!

HUMOR!

THRILLS!

lichigan Tire & Rubber Co.
Vulcanizing and Repairing
Accessories Free Air

337 So. Main Street

Telephone 408-j

I1 i

Michigan Central Special Train To Ithaca

If you have not already registered for transportation on the SPECIAL TRAIN for Cornell to
leave at 7:00 P. M. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10th, please do so at once,
in order that ample equipment may be provided to accommodate the large number who

H. A. TILLOTSON, Ticket Agent.

.

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