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November 05, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-05

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[HE WEATHER
ANN ARBOR-
FAIR AND COOLER
SUNDAY

61
} ยข1
a

...
.... "

wool

UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AN) MIGHT SERVICE
TILE ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

-

VOL. XXVIL No. 30.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CEN

. ____ .- t

WION AM PPEALS
FOR RE;-ELECTIDN
AT* ASBURBY lPARK
'4URPOSE JUSTICE AND LOVE OF
MANKIND," SAYS
PRESIDENT,
CALLS TARIFF ISSUE BEAD
Reiterates Assurance in Outcome of
Election in Speech on
Saturday

Choose Winners
In Cheer Contest

Jlullus

A. Negin, '19E, Receives First
Prize; Second Prize Goes
to K. I'" Jones, ',19

By ROBERT J.I
(United Press Staff
Asbury Park, N. J.,

BENDER
Correspondent)
Nov. 4.-Smash-

ing away at campaign methods employ-
ed by the Republicans in an effort to
"regain power," and tearing at issues
raised by opposition leaders, Presi-
dent Wilson here this afternoon made
his final appeal for re-election in order
that the world may know "how Ameri-
ca is going to work out her destiny,"
and that "her purpose is justice and
love of mankind."
The tariff issue is dead, the presi-
,dent said, "and now," he added, "indus-
tries formerly highly protected are at-
tempting coercion of their employees,
im.gining that these men are not their
own masters, and do not dare to vote
as they think. Thank God, the Ameri-
can laborer is awake and judges his
friends by what they do and not by
what they say."
Opponents are "filling the air with
alarms," the president declared sar-
castically "but the alarms are their
own, not ours," he added as the crowd
cheered. "They used to control the
course of the country, but now they
control nothing but the betting," he
said.
The president made an appeal for
party lines to be thrown aside in the
voting "to make the new America in
the new world mean the same for man-
kind that it meant when the republic
was set up." The president reiterated
his confidence in the result of the
election.
,McCormick Estimates Electoal Votes
New York, Nov. 4.-Re-election of1
President Wilson with 364 -electoral
votes next Tuesday was claimed inI
Democratic National Chairman Mc-
Cormick's 'first and only estimate of
the national election issue tonight. Mc-
Cormick placed the following states
with their respective electoral votes in
the Democratic column:
Alabama 12, Arizona 3, Arkansas 9,
Colorado 6, Connecticut 7, Delaware 3,
Florida 6, Georgia 14,:lllinois 29, In-
diana 15, Kentucky 16, Louisiana 10,
Maryland, 8, Mississippi 10, Missouri
18, Montana 4, Nebraska 8, Nevada 3,
New Jersey 14, New York 45, North
Carolina 12, Ohio 24, Oklahoma 10,
South Carolina 9, Tennessee 12, Texas
20, Virginia 12, Washington 7, West
Virginia 8, Wisconsin 13, Total 364.
WOMAN'S LEAGUE GAINS 225
NEW MEMBERS IN CA 1PAIGN

BOOM AH!
BANG RAH!
SMASH 'EM UP,
MICHIGAN!
This is the new Michigan yell that
was awarded first prize by the Athletic
association following the tryout atI
the hands of the yell masters during
yesterday's game with Washington.
Julius A. Negin, '19E, is the author
of the yell and receives the first prize
of $5.00. The second prize of $3.00
was awarded to L. O. B. Lindstrom,
'19E. This yell is as follows:
M-m-m M-m-m M-m-m
Mich-i-gan.
R-r-r R-r-r R-r-r
Rush-i-gan Michigan.
Rah!
The third prize of $2.00 went to K.
P. Jones, '19, for the following yell:
Mich-i-gan, fight a-gain,
Fight a-gain, Michigan.
Rah! Rah! Michigan!
More than three hundred cheers
were handed in for consideration fol-
lowing the announcement of F. J.
Scully, '12, that $10,00 would be di-
vided among the three students con-
tributing the winning yells.
BELEV 30 RON IN
GOLLSIBNOFF IRLND
Two Ships Crash Together in Dark;
Only One Surviver Reported;
Find Bodies on Coast
Lsondon, Nov. 4.-t is believed that
over 300 people were killed when the
London and Northwestern Railway
company steamship Connemara collid-
ed with the Retriever in the Irish
Channel last nigt. Both vessels were
sunk, according to report.
The Connemara was on its way out-
ward bound from Greenore to lfolt-
head with a quota of passengers, while
the Retriever was inward bound. So
far as known there is only one sur-
vivor from both vessels. Whether
there were Americans on board is a
question that the railway company has
been unable as yet to answer. The
(ships seldom carried saloon passeng-
ers. A few bodies have already been
recovered along the coast of Ireland.
The Connemara was one of the ships
utilized by the London and Northwest-
ern Railway company for the passen-
ger service maintained across -the 80
mile strip of water dividing England
from Ireland.
CARRANZISTAS DEFEAT TILLA
Message Reports Defeat of Bandits by
De Facto Troops
El Paso, Nov. 4.-Heavy fighting be-
tween Villista bandits and Mexican de
facto forces near Namquipa about 60
miles south of General Pershing's out-
post took place yesterday, according to
a message reaching Carranzista head-
quarters in Juarex tonight. Losses on
both sides were large.
The bandits were put to flight and
a quantity of rifles and ammunition
taken, the message declared. Seventy
bandits were killed and 19 executed
after the fight, de facto officials said.
The Carranzista losses were 25.
EXCITEMENT REIGNS AS CAN OF
FLASH LIGHT POWDER EXPLODES
New York, Nov. 4.-Explosion of a
big can of flash light powder which
let go with a loud report soon after
the Republican parade started here to-

night, resulted in great excitement for
a time, and seriously injured two
net spaper photographers. Candidate
Hughes was getting into his automo-
bile only a few feet away. Fearing a
possible bombing, police immediately
closed in about him. Hughes was
startled but remained in the automo-
bile.1
Majority Against Conscription Less
Melbourne, Australia, via London,
Nov. 4.-While returns from the con-
scription referendum are still incom-
plete, the majority in opposition to the
proposition is being reduced daily.

HUSKE-ES ZBig
OVATION AT NEW
YORKCITY TALK
REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE HEARS
PLAUDITS OF HIS AD- t
HERENTS1
CHEERS LAST 38 MINUTESI
Former Governor Makes Five Speeches1
During Course of Aft-
ernoon
By PERRY ARNOLDt
(United Press Staff Correspondent) I
New York, Nov. 4.---Standing on the
same platform where eight years agoI
he made his final appeal for his own
election as governor of New York,
Charles Evans Hughes, Republican
presidential candidate, tonight woundt
up one of New York's most impressive
organized political demonstrations by
his final appeal of the campaign for
votes. He spoke at Madison Square
Garden after having reviewed a parade
of 25,000 cheering, shouting, banner-
carrying, badge-bedecked Republicans.
It was the close of a perfect day for
the nominee; a day in which he had
been whirled at break neck pace
through the streets of the city for five
afternoon speeches, encountering ek-]
traordinary friendly audiences every-
where.
Thrilled by Cheers of Thousands
Iughes was thrilled by the cheers
of thousands and by the spectacle off
surging masses of citizens all agog
with excitement. At 9:15 o'clock as
Governor Whitman was winding up]
his speech at Madison Square Garden,
Hughes entered the hall. The crowd]
jumped to its feet yelling as if mad.
When the candidate got to the plat-t
form and stood smiling under the big
sounding board, the noise trebled.
Fifteen thousand persons by this time]
packed the vast hall overflooding from
the seats into the aisles.
Thirty thousand feet pounded in
unison in one titanic pound after an-
other while the owners yelled and
waved flags frantically. Hughes bowed
repeatedly, and then put on his glasses
the better to see the sight. Some en-
thusiast started yelling "Hughes!
Hughes! Hughes!" In a moment
5,000 voices had taken up the cry.
Wife and Children in Box.
National Chairman Wilcox standing
near Hughes wore a broad smile.
Someone pointed out to Hughes the
box where his wife and children were
seated and the nominee waved to them.
That was the occasion for a fresh out-
burst. At 9:53 o'clock the demonstra-
tion came to an end, having lasted 38
minutes.
PROF. ROGERS TO DELIVER
WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
Prof. Robert W. Rogers of the Drew
Theological Seminary will deliver the
second Wesleyan Guild lecture at the
Methodist church at 7:30 o'clock to-
night. Professor Rogers is one of
the country's most distinguished ori-
entalists and is an authority on ancient
Biblical hisptory. His subject will be
"A Bundle of Letters Thirty Centuries
Old."z

Give Particulars
For Cornell Trip
Special Train to Leave Ann Arbor at
7 O'clock Friday Night;
Fare $19
Next Friday night at 7 o'clock the
special train will leave Ann Arbor
taking the band, the reserves, and the
Michigan rooters to Ithaca. Accord-
ing to those in charge of the arrange-
ments, a large number is expected to
make the trip.I
The particulars concerning Michi-
gan's invasion of the east are as fol-
lows:
The fare is $19 round trp. Lower
berths are $5.50 and uppers $4.40 for
the round trip. Tickets are on sale
at Cushing's drug store and the Michi-
gan Union. Reservations should be
made at once.
There will be a special car of Jack-
son rooters and two cars of Detroit
rooters. The train will reach Ithaca
at 7 o'clock Saturday morning, giving
the whole day at Cornell.
Returning the train will leave Ithaca
about 11 o'clock Saturday night and
will reach Ann Arbor about 8:30
o'clock Sunday morning. The team
will be on the train coming back.
MAE FINAL PLANS FO.
FRESH LIT SSEMBOLY
Professor Vibbbert to Talk on Elig-
ibility Rules at Meeting To.
,morrow Afternoon
Every freshman student in the lit-
erary college is urged to attend the
first assembly which will be held at 4
o'clock Monday afternoon in the audi-
torium of the natural science building.
In addition to the talk to be given
by Professor Vibbert on "Eligibility
With Regard to Student Activities,"
there will be a short talk by Professor
Tilley of the English department, who
is one of the freshmen advisors. Pro-
fessor Davis, the other advisor, will
also speak.
These men, as well as the officers
of the freshman class, will appear in
order to allow the members of the
class to become acquainted with them.
Professor Tilley will explain the ad-
visory system and announce the hours
at which he and Professor Davis may
be seen by students.
A business meeting of the entire
class will be held at the end of the
regular program.
ORATORICAL SOCIETIES TO
SELECT MEN FOR CONTEST1
Next week each of the four oratori-'
cal societies will select the six men to
represent them in the elimination con-
tests in which the two teams for the
central league debates are selected.
The societies must have men selected
for Nov. 11. s
The Central Debating league is com-
posed of Chicago and Northwestern
Universities and the University of
Michigan. The league has been in ex-
istence for almost 20 years and the
Chicago-Michigan debate will be one
of the big events of the college year.
The debates this year are scheduled
for Jan. 19, 1917, and the question is,
Resolved: That the federal govern-
ment should levy a progressive inher-
itance tax, granted that such tax
would be held constitutional?

LIGHT WASHINGTON TEAIMUAL
FaLINGBFRVAIICBT

71

LOSERS STRUGGLE VAINLY AGAINST HEAVIER OPPONENTS, BUT
ARE OUTCLASSED IN EVERY DEPARTMENT
OF ONE-SIDED CONTEST
FREQUENT FUMBLES AND PENALTIES CURTAIL FINAL SCORE
Captain Maulbetsch, Zeiger, Brazell, Raymond, and Hanish Contribute
Points; Dunne Exhibits Fine Pnting; Visitors' Touchdown
Stirs Wolverines to Renewed Action
Michigan, 66; Washington, 7.
It was simply an old, old tale re-told--that of a light team struggling
vainly against a heavier one that outclassed it in every department. It
wasn't much to enthuse over.
The rooters spent the last portion of the game in speculating on the
probable size of the score, the presidential election, how long it would be
before Michigan fumbled again, and what a direful calamity it would be
if the state went wet.
Let it be said to the credit of the visitors that they were game,
willing, and that they tried hard every minute, and this last bit of com-
mendation is more than an unprejudiced observer could say for the Wol-
verines. Washington offered a feeble, hair line resistance, and they were
never in the running. They did their level best and the recording angel
should make notations to this effect.
Captain Johnny Maulbetsch headed
the touchdown brigade from au-
Americal point of view, contributing
five of Michigan's generous apportion-
EAST ment. The others were distributed
Cornell, 15; Carnegie Tech, 7. around among Zeiger, Brazell, Ray-
Harvard, 51; Virginia, 0. mond, and Hanish.
Hrnceto, 42;Brgnel, 0. Little Zeiger was once again the
Princeton, 42; Bucknell, 0. bright and shining light of the Michi-
Dartmouth, 15; Syracuse, 10. gan team. It's getting to be a habit
Army, 30; Notre Dame, 10. or second nature or something of this
Washington & Lee, 10; Navy, 0. kind, and all things considered, it is
one of the most popular little habits
Pennsylvania, 19; Lafayette, 0. that the Wolverines have contracted
Pittsburg, 46; Allegheny, 0. all fall. Zeiger's four long years of
Penn State, 79; Geneva, 0. apprenticeship have won a warm spot
WEST for him in the hearts of the Michi-
M. A. C., 3; South Dakota, 3. gan rooters and his recent stellar
Northwestern, 7; Indiana, 0. achievements have been an inceasing
Chicago, 16; Purdue, 7. source of joy to the Michigan students.
Nebraska, 3; Ames, 0. From present indications about the
Ohio State, 14; Wisconsin, 13. only way they can keep him out of
Illinois, 14; Minnesota, 9. that Cornell affair one week hence
Reserve, 53; Oberlin, 3. will be to declare him ineligible or
Case, 7; Ohio Wesleyan, 16. else postpone or cancel the game.
A detailed account of yesterday's
PROF. FILIBERT ROTH TO GIVE fray would read like a cross country
ILLUSTRATED LECTURE TONIGHT run or a signal practice. Thus, those
of you who have manfully waded this
far will be spared.
Will Address Unitaian Union on Phil Raymond played a nice game on
4'Forestry as a Public defense, while Peach was in there all
Question" the time, making his presence both
known and felt. Maulie and Pat Smith
"Forestry as a Public Question" is were gaining ground in fine style,
the title of an illustrated lecture which while Brazell contributed several long
will be given by Prof. Filibert Roth, dashes while he was in doing active
of the forestry department, at a meet- duty. By the time Brazell entered
ing of the Unitarian Young People's upon the scene of action, the Wash-
ington boys were growing pretty
Religious union at 6:30 o'clock tonight weary of life and they were Just about
in the church parlors. Cecil A. Ross, played out. All in all, it had been a
'18, will give a solo. pretty strenuous afternoon and no one
The meetings of the union are held blamed them a bit.
every Sunday night and all are wel- The Wolverines fumbled and fum-
come. bled badly at times while frequent
On Nov. 19 Prof. H. R. Cross, of the penalties served to keep down the
fine arts department, -will give an illus- score. The team drifted through the
trated lecture on "Masterpieces of Re- first quarter, but after the, visitors
ligious Paintings," and on Nov. 26, scored in the second, they grew more
Prof. E. R. Sunderland, of the Law interested and things progressed with
School, will speak on "Law and' considerable more speed and dash.
Ethics." Florence Paddock, '17, will Kling won undying fame in St. Louis
give a solo, .whenhepicked up a fumble and ran
45 yards for a touchdown. Everyone
SUFFRAGISTS FAVOR HUGHES seemed satisfied and no complaints
wereAregistered. Those loyal 300
rooters who journeyed all the way
President of University, Association from St. Louis were surely entitled to
States Position some action for the money invested
and they got it here. Pemberton kicked
"Certainly I am in favor of the Na- goal and they howled again 4nd some
tional Woman's party as an organized of them even acted as though they ex-
political faction, and, like it, I am pected to overtake the Wolverines and
supporting the candidacy of Hughes," win.
stated Florence Fitzpatrick, '19, presi- Coach Pontius stated after the game
dent of the University of Michigan that he was fairly well satisfied o
Equal Suffrage association, to a rep- the whole. "The fumbling and lacl
resentative of The Daily yesterday. (Continued on Page Six.)
"I would favor Hughes even if he

had not taken a stand on the equal SEiNIOR MEDICS CHOOSE CLASS
suffrage issue," she continued. "Presi- OFFICERS FOR COMING YEA
dent Wilson has shown an unwilling-
ness and inability to further the suf-
frag case n ay wy ad wile The officers for the coming year o:t
Hughes may possibly do no better, his the senior medical class have beei
personal attitude counts for a great elected at a regular meeting and wil
deal." be as follows: President, R.'M. Vin-
cent; vice-president, Henrietta Cal
Blow Up Western Canada Bank houn; secretary, L. W. Shaffer; treas
Calgary, Alberta, Nov. 4.-After cut- urer, L. A.' Ferguson; football mana
ting all wires leading into Okotoks, ger, W. S. Gonne; baseball manager
40 miles from here, today, yeggmen W. C. Breidenbach; track manager
leisurely dynamited the Merchants I Jack C. Hamill; basketball manager
bankthere and escaped with $10,000. J. W. Jones.

Committee of Forty
Membership Up1
Point

Women
to High

Bring

The Woman's league is just com-
pleting a campaign for members which
hasa lready brought the total far
about those of recent years and will
probably break all records when the
final results are in. A committee of 40
women has been working enthusiastic-
ally for the past week and it is through
their efforts, coupled with the fact that
an unusual number signed membership
cards during registration week, that
over 775 women are now members of
the Woman's league.
Last year the membership never
rose above 550 for the entire year and
the largest number on record is for
1913-14 when 830 women in the Uni-
versity were league members. Jean-
nette Armstrong, '17, chairman of the
membership committee, has been in
charge of the organization of the cam-
paign and has been assisted by Mar-
garet Atkinson, '19, and Kathryn
Johnson, '19.
Report Russian Warship Hits Mine
Berlin, via Wireless to Sayville, Nov.
4.-The Russian super-dreadnought
Sevastopol, one of the greatest fight-
ings ships in the czar's navy, ran upon
a mine eight days ago and was partial-
lv destroyed, according to a Stockholm

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
RKo bert W. Rogers
Distinguished Orientalist
Subject: A BUNDLE OF LETTERS THIRTY CENTURIES OLD

TO-NIGHT.
7:30

Methodist Church

TO-NIGHT
7:30

-
Presbyterian Church
HURON and DIVISION STS.
10:30; Students received into membership by affiliation.
Noon: Dr. G. CARL HUBER speaks to young men

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