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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


.,... .,

G. H. Wild Co.
Leading Merchant Tailors
State St.

(

1111111111 1Ill ll l 1111 iilliilii 111lllllll11111111111llll111,III I
-I
;RAFANOLAS
FOR
STUDENT'S ROOMS
$12,50
WHY PAY MORE?
MENDINGER MUSIC SHOP
122 E. Liberty St.
B V Y Y O V R

ALL]
lone 1692

L A U N D R0 Y

C A S

A T

heSlater Book Shop

DETROIT UNITED LINES
tween Dbtroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
os run on Eastern time, one hour faster
itroit Liited and Express Cars-8:to a.
d hourly to 7:10 p. in., 9:.10 p. m.
laiazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m. and
y two hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
opson Express Cars--(Local stops west of
cbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
eal Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m, 6:40 a.
:7o% a. m. and every two hours to 7:o5 p.
8-:o5 p. in., 9:05 p. M., 10:50 p. M. to
nti only. 9:2o a. m., 9:50 a. tn., 2:05 p.
ep. in., t1t:45 p. mn., t :to a. mn., t :20
.To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
ual Cars Westbound-6:05 a. m., 7:50 a.
t0:20 p. in.. 12:20 a. Mn.
i Fffmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
renient and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
leased with Our Service. Two Offices
106 S. Main St. : 330 S. State St.
TPLWRITERS of all makes
ale or Rent. Cleaning &
opairingo TYP3WRITING &
1-HEOGRAPING. SUPPLIES
O DMo rri1
Z2 S. State 582-1
IEORGE BISCH{OFF
FLOR IST,
oce Cut Flowess and Plants
Chapin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.
PhONE 809 M
STOP AT
T U T T L E'S
338 S. STATE
for sodas and lunches

We Offer You
SECURITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION
Resources $3,8oo ,oo
Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office-- t
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Office -
707 North University Ave.
GIRLS! buy tickets at Beauty Shop and
save $1.50 on $5.00. Souvenir with
every 5oc purchase of cosmetics.
MISS Mable Rowe
503 First National Bank Bldg. Phone 2402
FIRST NATL BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $100,000 Surplus and Profit $63,ooo
DIRECTORS
Wirt Cornwell Waldo M. Abbott
Geo. W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
Fred Schnid D. B. Sutton
E. D. Kinnie
THE SUGAR BOWL
109 S. Main St.
SPECIAL SUNDAES
LIGHT LUNCHES
Our candies are made in
our own sanitary shop.

MC lANT lM
Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan. Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions:-by carrier $2.50; by mail, $3-oo.
Want ad. stations: 6uarry's; Students' Sup-
ply Store ; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed Soo words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker:.........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn.................City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Verne E. Burnett..........Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade.........Statistical Editor
J. E. Campbell... .Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Enery ..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne.. Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau....Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter....Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
L. S. Thompson E. A. Bauingarth
L. W. Nieter J. L. Stadeker
Reporters
B. A. Swaney C. W. Neumann
W. R. Atlas C. C. Andrews
E. L. Zeigler IT. C. Garrison
Allen Schoen feld C. M. jjickling
Marian Wilson D. S. Rood
Business Staff
Bernard Wohl J. E. Robinson
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
E. Reed Hunt Hlarold J. Lance
Earl F. Ganschow Walter R. Payne
Harold Makinson
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1916.
Night Editor-J. L. Stadeker.
Communications and notices of any
kind addressed to The Daily will be
consigned to the wastebasket unless
accompanied by the authors signature.
THE SPIRIT AT WASHINGTON
Washington's football team is ac-
companied by 300 rooters who char-
tered a special train to bring them to
Ann Arbor. Their cause seems to be
a hopeless one as far as a possible
victory is concerned.
Thus in this demonstration of un-
flagging loyalty and support there lies
a real lesson for Michigan football fol-
lowers. When a university the size of
Washington can send 300 rooters all
the way from St. Louis to Ann Arbor
with their team acknowledged the
weaker, just how big a delegation can
Michigan reasonably expect at Ithaca
one week from today? Michigan's
hopes of a victory in the east are high.-
This should serve to augment the size'
of the Michigan contingent that will
make the trip. Washington has no
such expectations..
Michigan respectfully bows before
this admirable showing. We welcome
such an opponent, and extend the most
cordial of greetings.

HALL REPLIES TO FITCH
MAINTAINS THAT HE IS UNAFRAID
TO STAND BEHIND HIS COM-
MUNICATION
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
My object in writing the communica-
tion which appeared in Thursday's
Daily, signed "Senior Law," was not
to accuse either candidate in the re-
cent law. election of personal corrupt
practice; nor was it to further ad-
vertise my class, which already stood
condemned in the light of public opin-
ion. The article was inserted because
of a conviction that the facts stated
therein were typical of a disease
which exists at Michigan, not only in
the Law School, but elsewhere on the
campus. I confined my remarks to
professional fraternities because, at
that time, I had no direct evidence of
petty politics outside of the profes-
sional schools. This deficiency in in-
formation has since been supplied by
'friends of mine, voluntarily.
I could squander space in The Daily
in answering Mr. Fitch's aimless tirade
of Friday morning, based wholly upon
the fact that I did not sign my name
to Thursday's communication, if I
chose to do so. I can seb no bene-
fit to either of us, or to the school at
large, from such action, for The Daily
does not pose as a comic sheet. Mr.
Fitch wholly failed to comprehend my
object in writing as I did. My pur-
pose was to set thinking men and
women, both in and out of societies,
at work upon an important campus
problem, with the idea of changing
conditions which are known to exist
and which, in some cases, have be-
come Intolerable. I have reason to
believe that the evil will be remedied
through action on the part of the stu-
dent council, proposed at a meeting
held Thursday evening. If not, some-
thing further will undoubtedly be done
by others.
I trust that this may dispel the il-
lusion, apparently existing in the
minds of some people, that I am afraid
to stand behind what I have written,
and that I was actuated, in writing
Thursday morning's article, by per-
sonal spleen.
ROY HALL, '17L.
CELEBRATE FOUNDING OF ST.
PAUL'S CHURCH IN NEW YORK

Go to Church
Sunday
November 5

L A

0F
0

owna
be oft
your tir. cA i°E.

''; 11I 11ilft111111111r lfl~ lllllillll111111111l 11111l II111ill I 11111lliliilllll illlill111111.
1=
DESPITE WAR PRICES _
Our slightly-soiled
novels, even the latest,
must sell at 50c.
i
I-
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES
wIIIIII~ l11t1 IlIi ifIt1111111i rt11l t111r11111111111111111r11H ll ll lll llllt111111ti°t

Nt
re folks changed theirU
itemp'r'ments they'd
s -tisfied with those
"... glb ors'.
e .-pasS

-
: Home Made Candies
Strictly fresh and of the best quality. Pure cream walnut caramels, as-
sorted nut chocolates in ilb. boxes, 35c. Bitter sweet and chocolate creams
all fresh. I Special ice cream sundaes.
THE FOUNTAIN of YOUTHI
State St. Cor. Liberty
lsrn --Mli
Ii N -
NZ N.Il
u,~.OR
U( LOWERS
IIiii 2 liiiAl
Anthr3 E. Liberty St. Phone 294
i ;If reminder not to forget us when in need of Flowers for any
themus. Roses, Violets, Sweet Peas, Orchids, Carnations, Chrysan-
theumsand Potted Plants. Coruage Work a Specialty.
Member Florist Telegraph Delivery Service.

KET OcanOn
the iion P1 urs
so

I

4I

GOOD
ONES

WARNS AGAINST IMPERFECT
GAS STOVE CONNECTIONS
By Samuel G. Dixon
(Pennsylvania Commissioner of
Health.)
This is the season of the year when
many people instead of starting their
furnaces use gas stoves to take off
the chill. Not infrequently they use
rubber pipe connections and in the
majority of cases the stoves are not
coninected with a flue.
Such an arrangement is dangerous
in the extreme. Every year many
deaths are reported as a result of
just such conditions. Coal gas or wa-
ter gas contains a large percentage of
carbon monoxide, and this gas having
little or no perceptible odor may be
present without being noticed. There
is no warning and unless material
having an odor is added to the gas, the
victim becomes unconscious and un-
less aid arrives a fatal result is al-
moost certain to follow.
Do not use a gas stove without flue
connections and proper ventilation.
Gas water heaters are often installed
in bath rooms without outside con-
nections and then these are made use
of' to heat the room. Such arrange-
ments are extremely hazardous.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC FACULTY
TO GIVE ADDITIONAL RECITAL
An extra twilight recital will be
given by members of the School of
Music faculty in Hill auditorium
Nov. 15.
Mr. Earl V. Moore, organist, will
present the major portion of the pro-
gram and will be assisted by the fol-
lowing artists: Lucile Johnson, harp-
ist; Ada Grace Johnson, soprano;,
Nora Crane Hunt, contralto, and An-
thony J. Whitmire, violinist.
The complete program will be an-;
nounced later.;

New York, Nov. 3.-The anniversary
of the founding of St. Paul's chapel,
Vesey street and Broadway, or Old St.
Paul's, as it is now generally known,
is being observed today in the chapel
with sermon by the Right Rev. Daniel
S. Tuttle, presiding bishop of the
Episcopal church.
George Washington, Alexander Ham-
ilton, and scores of other his-
tory makers of colonial days frequent-
ly attended service at St. Paul's. Part
of one of Washington's ipaugurals
was held there.
Bishop Alfred Harding, of Washing-
ton, will preach tomorrow and the
Right Rev. Charles S. Burch will close
the anniversary celebration with a
service Saturday.
Wisconsin to Give Military Course
Madison, Wis., Nov. 3.-The military
department of the university expects
to be one of the first to be affected by
the recent, act of congress providing
for an officers' training course. It will
probably be a four year course and
will give students in civil educational
institutions an opportunity to qualify
as reserve officers available in event
of war. " Subjects that will be touched
are military history, elements of inter-
national law, minor tactics, map
maneuvers, and court martial proceed-
ings.
Use the advertising columns of the
Michigan Daily in order to reach the
best of Ann Arbor'A buyers.

[ntercortegfate
Harvard: The Crimson has leased
a special wire to receive returns
from the elections, Nov. 7. As fast
as results come in they are to be
tabulated on a bulletin board.
Syracuse: The agricultural faculty
has a new plan for helping the
farmer "directly by the recently or-
ganized agricultural extension
schools.
Yale: With an army officer as in-
structor, Yale undergraduates have
formed the first successful college
aerial unit. Two hydro-aeroplanes
are at the disposal of the students
and rapid advances are being made.
Iowa: The students of the university
expect to raise money enough to sup-
port two camps of prisoners in Eu-
rope this winter. The money is to
be distributed from Copenhagen.
Oklahoma: Freshmen were angry
when a member of the junior class
appeared on the campus wearing a
red cap, the traditional headgear of
the first year men. The junior in-
sisted that he was a freshman, but
after much heated discussion finally
admitted that the offending cap was
part of his last year's baseball uni-
form.
Kansas: Over 900 students have been
inoculated because of the typhoid
scare at the university.! The health
service is working at top speed and
the fight against the spread of the
disease is making headway.
Utah: The sophomores have found a
way for enforcing the payment of
class dues. All men delinquent aft-
er Nov. 2, are to receive a thorough
ducking on their first appearance on
the campus.
Illinois: Recently compiled statistics
show that students who room alone
have much higher average scholar-
ship than others.
Kansas: Students held an indigna-
tion meeting last week to denounce
the proposed re-establishment of the
8 o'clock class. For the past two
years classes have begun at 8:30
o'clock and suggestions for a return
to the earlier hour have met with
serious objection.

SI

---
Independent Girls' club will meet
at 7:15 o'clock Monday evening, Nov.
6, in Barbour gymnasium. Election of
vice-president will take place.
The board of directors of the Wom-
en's league will meet at 8:30 o'clock
this morning in Barbour gymnasium.
All Women's league pledges must be
paid this week to Marie Macauley, '18,
or at Dean Jordan's office.
All girls who are to be leaders of
squads in gymnasium apparatus work
should see Miss Evans this week.
Women's health service office hours
are as follows: 9 to 12 o'clock, except
Saturday; 2 to 4 o'clock Monday,
Tuesday, Thursday; Friday by ap-
pointment.
Arrangements have been made by
the Women's league to meet the 50
Washington women who are coming
for today's game, at the train this
morning. They will first be taken to
Barbour gymnasium, after which a
tour of the dormitories will be made.
Luncheon will be served for them at
Newberry hall. It is hoped that as
many University women as possible
will attend the luncheon. Those wish-
ing to do so must sign the list on the
bulletin board at Barbour gymnasium
before 10 o'clock this morning.
Aid Assignments Made to Freshmen
Cambridge, Mas., Nov. 3.-Aid as-
signments of $100 to $200 have been
made to 54 freshmen from the an-
nual appropriation of $16,000 given to
Harvard University by Ezikel Green-
leaf. These loans are given to first
year students who need the help and
to others who have not succeeded in
competition for scholarships.
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. 18-tf

Takes Pictures
Develops films
18 1 flmakes Prints
and Enlarge-
713ts,
713 E. UnValssty

e ies ae Fis nBesit The ares
letro Features Have First Run at The Arcade Theatre.

Use the advertising columns of
Michigan Daily in order to reach
best of Ann Arbor's buyers.

the
the

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