100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 03, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A

I , w rI 1
LNN ARBOR-
THURSDAY
F'AI

w a iw , A 4 w Naq w

A LY

p

UNITED PRESS W
DAY AND NIGHT SERVI
THE ONLY MORNING PAPE
ANN ARBOR

h.

VOL XXVII. No. 28. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1916. PRICE FIVE C]

DODGE BROTHERS
PETITION AGAINST
FORD CO~, DETROIT

JUDGE 'MANDELL ISSUES'
PORARY RESTRAINING
ORDER

TEI-

CHARGE INTEREST IS PERILED
State Motor Plant Projects Purchase
of Iron Mines, Ore Ships and
Steel Mills'
Detroit, Nov. 2.-A temporary re-
straining order, limiting the extension
of operations of the Ford Motor com-
pany, and preventing the expenditure
of large sums for expansion, was Is-
sued late today by, Circuit Judge
Mandell, on petition of the Dodge
Brothers, Detroit auto manufacturers,
who hold ten per cent of the stock of
the, Ford company.
The petitioners seek to force the
Ford company to declare a special
dividend, which they assert the com-
pany is earning, instead of putting the
money back into the business in ex-
tensions. One of the sensational
declarations of the bill is the state-
ment that the Ford management is
jeopardizing the interests of the Dodge
company "by reckless proposed ex-
tensions tobe entered upon in the
carrying out of the policy of ex-
pansion."
Purchase of iron mines in upper
Michigan, ships to carry the ore, and
erection of steel plants in Detroit, are
cited as some of the things planned t
by the Ford company.' The bill
charged that the Ford company seeks
to monopolize the manufacture of low-
priced automobiles. The bill declares
Henry Ford owns 58 per cent of the
stock of the Ford company.
Citing the fact that no special divi-
dends had been declared since 1915,
the petitioners pointed to the last fi-
nancial statement of the Ford com-
pany, showing profits of $60,000,000,
and declared that despite this, stock-
holders received only the regular five
per cent dividend. Judge Mandell
fxed Nov. 11 for first hearing of the
suit.
MEMBERS OF T-SQUARE CLUB
TO STAGE PARTY NEXT FRIDAY
Women members of T-Square, cos-
tumed as children, will assemble next
Friday at the home of Mrs. Green of
the engineering department for their
first party of the year.
The society has been holding in-
formal meetings fortnightly at which
an effort has been made .to have all
new members present. The society
has as student members this year,
three engineers, eight architects, and
alumni and honorary members. Sev-
eral other social affairs are planned.
ROT TO ADDRESS UNITARIAN
YOUNG PEOPLE'S UNION SUNDAY
Prof. Filibert Roth, of the forestry
department, will address the Unitarian
Young People's Religious union at
6:30 o'clock Sunday evening in the
church parlors. His subject will be
"Forestry as a Public Question." The
lecture Will be illustrated. Cecil A.
Ross, '18, will give a solo.
The union h6lds these meetings
every Sunday night and anybody is
welcome.
GLOVER READS PAPER BEFORE
HEALTH ASSOCIATION MEETING
Prof. James W. Glover, of the math-
ematics department, has returned from
attendance at the annual meeting of
the American Public Health associa-
tion. He read a paper on "The New
United States Life Tables" before the
section on vital statistics.

Le Gallienne Not
Able to :Lecture
Poet Becomes Ill Suddenly and Leaves
for ast With Party
Thursday
Richard Le Gallienne, the distingu-
ished poet, who was scheduled to de-
liver a lecture before the Poetry club
on Wednesday evening, and another
in the auditorium of University hall
last night, was forced to disappoint his
audience in both instances, due to a
sudden illness.
Prof. Thomas Trueblood, when asked
to make a statement last night, re-
plied that he was given to understand
Mr. Le Gallienue was often afflicted
with asthma and that his malady oc-
curred with especial virulence during
his stay in Ann Arbor.
To alleviate his illness, the poet was
for1ced to take a medicine containing
a powerful opiate, which eventually
rendered him unable to appear at the
lectures. His party left for the east
late yesterday.
Those who purchased tickets at the
meeting of the Poetry club Wednesday
night can secure a refund by applying
,to A. P. Bogue at 555 South Division
street.
Soldiers to Vote
While on Border
Several Thousand Choices Already
Registered by Men on Hex-
lean Front
Washington, Nov. 2.-Several thou-
sand -votes already have been cast in
next Tuesday's election. Several thou-
sands more will be cast before that
day. The great part of them are the
votes of soldiers stati ed on the bor-
der. Today about 4,000 Minnesotians
are exercising their franchise by wire,
it is estimated at- the war department.
Colorado has about 1,900, Michigan
4,000, Wisconsin, 3,900, and South Da-
kota 1,000 down on the Rio Grande en-
titled to vote in this manner.
By J. P. YODER
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
Toledo, Nov. 2.-Why President Wi..
son should not be re-elected-his pet
theme-was Athe subject of Colonel
Roosevelt's speech here at noon today
when he invaded the Buckeye state
for Hughes rallies here and at Cleve-
land.
Washington, Nov. 2.- Secretary of
State Lansing said this afternoon he
would not expect the information de-
sired concerning the sinking of the
Marina to reach Washington before
the middle of next week. ,
New York, Nov. 2.-Charges that
some dealers, the middlemen, were
squeezing out high coal prices in ad-
vance of an actual coal famine, came
today from city retailers.
New York, Nov. 2.-In a spirited at-
tack on the "opposition of big busi-
ness to progress," President Wilsn
this afternoon told the business mens'
league luncheon here that the "lead-
-ing business men of the country and
their legal counsel have deterred with
subtle checks, all progressive legisla-
tion."
New York, Nov. 2.-Republican nom-
inee Hughes today said he was entire-
ly confidant of victory in the debatable

states of Ohio and Indiana.
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Nov. 2.-Under
merciless sweating Thomas F. Wil-
liams, county official, today confessed
that he strangled to death pretty Ida
May Brown, whose body was found
two weeks ago in the Susquehanna riv-
er. His unexpected admission of guilt
cleared up what promised to develop
into a great murder mystery.

VIL'TBSHOOT
28, ROB 400, IN
HOLDING UPRI

I)E

FACTO TROOPS FORMING1
BODYGUARD KILLED IN
SQUADS

Council Plans Big Send-off for
Team Blefore Cornell Game
A big Cornell send-oiff in which students will take the team to
the train when leaving for Ithaca and also meet them on their re-
turn from the east was planned at a meeting of the student coun-
cil last night. The members of the committee in charge of this
send-off are: S. S. Atwood, '18E, chairman, H. E. O'Brien, '17, H.
L. Carroll, '17E, and H. L. Keim, '17M.
Plans for the Penn celebration to be staged by the different de-
partments on the campus were discussed. This celebration will be
in the form of a mock pageant to be held in Sleepy Hollow. It will
be followed by free shows in Weinberg's coliseum given by the local
theaters. The committee in charge is composed of D. W. Sessions,
'17L, chairman, H. A. Taylor, '17E, W. B. Steele, '17D, and V. W.
Bergstrom, '17H.

200 BANDITS ACTING IN RAID

Passengers Lined Up, Relieved
Money and Valuables; Chihua-
hua City Isolated

of

El Paso, Nov. 2.-Twenty-eight Mex-
ican de facto soldiers forming the
escort to a train of the Mexican Cen-
tral railway lines were butchered in
cold blood, 400 passengers were lined
up and robbed, and a German subject
beaten senseless by 200 Villista bandits
at Laguna last Monday, when the rail-
road line was cut by the Villistas. Of-
ficial announcement to this effect was
made here today by Consul Soirano
Bavari.
The town of Laguna is about 150
miles straight south of the Mexican
border. An official bulletin giving
meagre details of the butchery reached
the border when the wires were re-
opened today. Bandit chiefs Murga
and Quesedo allied with Villa, and
noted for theiracruelty, were in com-
mand of the Villista detachment.
The train which left Juarez Monday
was crowded with passengers. All
were ordered from the cars, lined up
and robbed of their valuables, and in
some cases, of their clothing and shoes.
The armed escort of 28 men from the
Juarez garrison' -were taken out in
squads, stood beside the cars, and shot
down before the terrified passengers.
Their arms and ammunitions were
taken by the bandits.
The passengers were then held under
guard while another party looted the
express car. As soon as information
of the affair reached Chihuahua City a
military train with 400 de facto sol-
diers was hurried north to Sauz in an
attempt to strike the raiders. The
consulate's announcement admitted
that the railroad line is still severed
at several points, and Chihuahua City
is isolated. No trains are leaving
Juarez today.
SENIOR SOCIETY INITIATES
AND BANQUETS NEW MEMBERS
Dean Myra B. Jordan Acts as Toast-
mistress; Toasts Tell Chapter
of Society's History
Senior society, the honorary ide-
pendent women's society, last night
initiated the following women from
the senior class: Awey McDonald,
Harriet Walker, Della Laubengayer,
Pearl Smith, Janet McFarlane, and
Leah Scheuren. Following the initia-
tion, a banquet was held at Foster's
tea room.
The program of toasts represented a
volume of the history of the Senior so-
ciety. Dean Myra B. Jordan, acting
as toastmistress, gave the preface and
introduction; Emily Sargent, '16, a
synopsis of preceding volumes; Hazel
Giddings, '17, a criticism of the pres-
ent volume, and Pearl Smith, '17, the
advance press notices for next year's
edition.
According to a recently established
custom, initiates will each wear a
rose, the society flower, on the day
following their initiation.
NATIONAL Y. W. C. A. SECRETARY
GIVES VESPER SERVICE TALK
Emphasizing the need of a more
thorough application of the Christian
rule of brotherly love, Miss Leslie
Blanchard, national Y. W. C. A. sec-
retary, yesterday gave an address at
the Vesper service of the Y. W. C. A.

GERMANS RETREAT
FROM FORT VAUX

DEPARTMENT OF
STATE STAYS FIRM

Last of Verdun Forts in
Germans Evacuated
Teutons

Hands
by

of

Defines Position of Americans
Fight for England in
Present War

Who

ITALIANS SHOW NEW ACTIVITY MANY FACING EXPATRIATION

Rome, Nov. 2.-A wireless re-
eived from Petrograd this after-
noon regarding the fighting in
Volhynia, said a great battle has
started on a 500-mile.front along
the Danube which may be the most
important f the war on th..east.
ern front.
Berlin, Nov. 2.-Fort Vaux on the
northeast front of Verdun has been
evacuated by German troops. "The
artillery engagement on the east bank
of the Meuse repeatedly increased to
great intensity," said the official state-
ment. "The French directed specially
heavy . destructive fire against Fort
Vaux, which had alread; been evacu-
ated during the night by our troops,
following a given order and without
being disturbed by the enemy. Im-
portant parts of the fort were blasted
by us before withdrawing." '
Fort Vaux was the last of the Ver-
dun forts remaining in the hands of
the Germans, Fort Douaumont having
been recaptured by the French in their
recent offense. United Press dis-
patches from Verdun Saturday night
declared that Fort Vaux was sur-
rounded on three sides by the French,
whose artillery was ringing the fort-
ress with fire, cutting off supplies to
the Germans.
Fort Vaux was captured by the Ger-
mans on June 6, after a terrific bat-
tle. The Germans systematically re-
duced the French defenses by constant
artillery fire,. until the fort was no
longer tenable. It was evacuated by
the Germans on the two hundred and
fifty-secondth day of the great strug-
gle at Verdun.
Rome, Nov. 2.-Resuming their drive
on Trieste, the Italians yesterday oc-
cupied the Austrian line at several
points south of the Oppacchiasella-La
Castagneizza road, and captured 4,731
prisoners. An official statement from
the Austrian war office transmitted to-
day admitted great Italian artillery ac-
tivity on the Isonzo front. Berlin dis-
patches to the United Press several
days ago predicted that the Italians
would soon begin an offensive to lift
the pressure of the Austrians on Rou-
mania.
Berlin, Nov. 2.-Enemy warships
have shelled the Roumanian Black sea
port of Constanza, recently captured
by the Germans and Bulgarians with-
out success. "Roumanian attacks
against the Austro-German troops that
had advanced beyond Altschauz and
Predeal pass failed under losses. We
captured eight officers and 200 men.
"South of Red Tower pass engage-
ments were favorable to us. On the,
Macedonian frontier, Serbians ad-1
vanced in the Cerna bend and north
of the Nidze Plenina were repulsed.!
On the Struma front there have been'
active foreground engagements."

Washington, Nov. 2.-Any American
who fights for England in the present
war expatriates himself.
The state department made this clear
today in connection with its action
in refusing a passport to Theodore
Marburg, jr., of Baltimore, who is re-
turning to England to rejoin the Royal
Aviation corps. Marburg is the son of
the former United States minister to
Belgium.
Expatriation results from the fact
that all British soldiers must take the
oath of allegiance to the British crown,
which, in the case of Americans, wipes
out their allegiance to this country.
As to the Americans fighting for the
foreign legion of the French army, the
department made known that the bur-
den will rest upon them to prove the
they have taken has not expatriated]
them.
"Even after peace is declared," it
was said by the department, "a man
who has served in the armies abroad
will not be granted passports to travel
as American citizen. Those who re-
turn to this country in destitute cir-
cumstances will be treated as ordin-
ary alien immigrants." It was stated
also that the state department has
suggested to the French government
that it discontinue referring, to the
American aviators with the French
armies as members of the American
corps, owing to the false light in
which such references place the Unit-
ed States as a neutral nation.
HUGHES-WILSON CLUBS PUBLIC
DEBATE MAY NOT BE STAGED
Plans Seem to , Have Miscarried Al-
though Both Clubs Claim Read-
iness to Argue
Plans for the public debate to have
been held between the Hughes and
Wilson clubs of the University seem
to have miscarried, and it is unlikely
that the contest will be held.'
Both clubs still claim that they are
willing to debate, but the Hughes club'
has expressed itself as dissatisfied
with the wording of the question, "Re-
solved, That Charles Evans Hughes
is better fitted for the presidency of the
United States than President Wilson."
The Wilson adherents have consented
to a change of the wording, and agreed
to leave it entirely in the hands of a
member of the law faculty.
The Wilson club contends that the
Hughes men have not yet accepted
their challenge, while the Hughes men
claim that they have accepted the
challenge, but not the wording of the
question as proposed to them. Unless
a definite understanding is reached
very soon, the matter will necessarily
be dropped.

BIG BNDBONC
THIS EVENING rIN
Hill AUITORI f
MORRISON WOOD, '17, HEADS CAS
OF 10 IN CAMPUS
SKIT
SEVEN ACTS TO MAKE UP OIL
Orva Williams, '19, Puts on Huinoroi
Sketch; 13 Women Give
"Algebraic Antics"
When members of the Varsity ban4
clad in their new uniforms, strike u
the opening bars of "The Victors" i
Hill auditorium at 8 o'clock tonigh
the program of the first 1916 Ban
Bounce will be formally begun.
Walter R. Atlas, '18, manager of th
band, is enthusiastic over the respons
which was made to the call for try
outs, and the manner in which thos
finally selected have practiced to ma
the production a success. It is sai
that the form shown by the partic:
pants in the various acts is little shot
of professional.
Seven acts are on this evening
program in addition to the entertai
ment which is to be offered by th
band itself. What will perhaps prov
to be the best of seve'ral mirth-prc
voking skits is in the form of a pantc
mime, the scene of which is laid alon
one of the diagonal walks. Stude
Idiosyncrasies are made to serve a
the butt for good-natured fun. Tb
cast comprises six men and four wo,
en, the act being coached by Morri
son Wood, '17, who takes one of th
parts.
Orva Williams, '19, with an "all-sta
cast," will put on a humorous sketc
entitled "The Drummer's Farewell.
The roles of drummer, wife, and hte
clerk are filled by Williams.
Musical numbers include the sing
ing of L. A. Emmerman, '18L, and th
mandolin playing of J. H. Steves
'18E, as well as the act presented b
Arthur L. Murray, '19, who will fea
ture his own song, "I Want to Dance.
James Hoge, '17, will accompany hit
upon the piano.
Fred Adams, '17, M. Allen, Leonari
Brooks, '19, and Bruce Tappan, '1
have displayed considerable talent I:
their winging and dancing act. Adam
has won approval by. his clever in
terpretation of an oriental dancer.
The 13 women taking part in th
aesthetic dance, "Algebraic Antics,
appeared for the Wednesday night r
hearsal in their fantastic garb. Th
intricate figures were esecuted withi
out a hitch and a smooth performance
is promised for this evening.
Tickets were placed on sale a
tables situated upon the campus ye
terday, and the stations will continu
disposing of the cards today. The 22
men and women who have been sell
ing tickets since Monday have r
portedan unexpectedly large sale. Tb
pasteboards will be on sale at the 'bo
office in Hill auditorium before the pe
forma nce.
The band will open the program i
8 o'clock sharp.
"THE MAGIC CARPET" TRYOUT
TO BE HELD THIS AFTERNO0O
The try-outs for "The Magic Cai
pet," the production to be presente
by the Cosmopolitan club'in Januar
will be held from 3 to 5 o'clock toda

in McMillan hall. Prof. J. Raleig
Nelson, head of the English depart
ment of the engineering college, wi
be in charge of these tryouts. As a
the campus is eligible for this produi
tion, it is expected that many beside
the members of the club will turn ou
Professor Nelson produced severs
plays while residing in Chicago. H
will announce the cast, which will I
picked from the try-outs the first c
next week.

_ -

,. .

Come to the

To-night

Hill

8:00

BAND
A short and snappy

BOUNCE
ogram of feature vaudeville

Auditorini

wffiw19

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan