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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

RICHARD

LE

GALLIENNE

TO=N IG

H T

IIIiHl1111111111111111IIIIIIIINI11111111111111111111lllllllllillllll lillllllllll lilllllilllllllllillllllllllillllllllllIINIIN111111111 1111[iU111111E1i1llilllllllllllllllllllllllii

CAUSES LOSS
HALF' BILLION

PLANS FOR VOCATIONAL
CONFERENCE COMPLETED
Committees Chosen by Elsie Paul, '17,
Chairman of AffairI

LANDSCAPE DESlSN
HAS NEW QUARTERS

,ACTIVITIES LIMITED BY
WOMENS'_LEAGUE PLAN

range, Cotton and
r Heavy Shrinkage
In Values

Grain

Possesses Best Accommodations
Kind in Any State University
in Country

of

Points Given to Students Active
Campus; Maximum, Twelve
During Semester

on

Freshman Sees
Sign of Spring
"Well, c'n you beat that?" exclaimed
the "frosh" as he stopped in front of
a State street store yesterday morn-
ing. "Here's a guy gettin' his straw
hats in already. Some speedy bird,
I'll say."
Perhaps someone has inside infor-
mation that spring is coming early

this year, or maybe the student coun-
cil has placed Straw Hat Day next,
month.
"I guess that's bad," said the awe-
struck green one as he passed on
down the street to "Tuts."

STILL ARE LARGE

ork, Nov. 1.-The outstanding
the past month was the sud-
earance of a German sub-a
off our coasts. The destruc-
a caused shipping in a few
as responsible for a break at
ting of the next day's market
or severity, has not been ap-

{
A
T
l

ed in long years. It has been
that $500,000,000 was knocked
ues on the Stock-Exchange, andt
0,000 more on cotton and grain.I
hundred million is a heavy
age in values even in these1
f record breaking events, and
sises how extremely vulnerable
arkets had become as a resultl
extraordinary speculation of
evious weeks.1
vithstandbig the lesson of cau-
is unexpected occurrence shouldI
rought home, the public seems=
ore inclined to consider favor-
ather than unfavorable factors,
nsequently with the disappear-
the U-53, the memory of its
onslaughts faded rapidly, and
of a constructive nature a
themselves to theafront.
of among these factors is th~e
uation of war orders on an
ous scale, easy money, and rec-
reaking exports to belligerent
eutral nations. In September
lance of trade in favor of this
y was $348,719,000, and for the
months ended Sert. 30, $2,664,-
0. There seems little chance
early check to exports for the
3 that belligerent as well as
i nations must continue to buy
is so long as the war lasts, and
nfortunately all too ev4 ident that
vo groups of powers are deter-
to fight to a finish.
is accordingly quite invitable
the very circumstances under
these exports are made, that
reign buyer ether ship us gold
ist float lo,:ns in our markets
he cannot pay us in kind. Ir:
to borrow cheaply it is of prime
tance that our money markets

Plans for the annual Vocational
Conference for women to be held in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, Nov. 23 to
Nov. 25, are completed under the guid-
ance of Elsie Paul, '17, chairman.
The following committees have been
appointed by the chairman: faculty
committee, Dean Myra B. Jordan, Mrs.
William D. Henderson, and Dr. Elsie
Pratt; finance committee, Paulene
Champlin, '18; publicity, Valora Quin-
lan, '18; entertainment, Marcia Pinker-
ton, '19; luncheon, Amy Nelsokt, '17;
invitation, Jeannette Armstrong, '17,
and Margaret Henderson, '13.
The appointees are to choose their
own committees to assist them, and
the work will be done by these indi-
vidual small committees rather than,
by one large group to avoid confusion.
Plans for housing the delegates and
speakers have not been entirely com-
pleted, but the committee plans to call
upon the Martha Cook Building, New-
berry Residence, sorority houses and
a few resident homes for accommoda-
tions for the visiting delegates and
speakers.

NECESSITIES, RISE
RPIDplLY OF LATE;

MUCH INTEREST SHOWN IN WORK
With the beginning of this semester,
the department of landscape design
occupied its new quarters, on the en-
tire f'--+1.. A - f +knLU f iiUL xxrinro

Ticrn e of 3Q% in Prices in U.
Mt Result in Serious Unrest
Awtug Unorganized Labor,

S.1

WHE T 1.Y ADVANCE TO $2.60
The ur precedented rise in the cost
of necessities during the last few
years has attracted the attention of
most thinking people of our country
and has been the cause of 'ouch whole-
some investigation in car economic
affairs. In the United States alone
this increase has been about 30 per
cent while the large foreign nations
have leen affected to a grrater degree
than here. In this cour.try the short
cropof wheat is causln-; the greatest
concern, the dcmestl( ned over our
present crop ol 600,V),000 bushels be-
ing 625,000,000 bushels. And at the rate
at wl-ich wheat is be:ng e-)orted even
:ast y ear's surplus wih1 not fill this
:need. The result has been a rise in

tire fourth floor or the south wing or
University hall. Since the recent im-
provements in the reconstruction of
'the building, the landscape depart-
ment now possesses the best accom-
modations of the kind to be found in
any state university in the country.
Besides the general offices, the new
offices now include private offices, two
class rooms, a lecture room, a lantern
room, and a reference library. In the
library are to be found a large number
of volumes in several languages, deal-
ing with all phases of landscape de-
sign, from the building of roads for
large estates to the planning of small
flower gardens for lesser ones. All
past plans are kept on file in the
library, as well as the most prominent
designs, made by the leading draughts-
men for the last several years. Cur-
rent magazines on gardening and
landscape work are regularly received,
and a full list of catalogues of nurs-
ery and building materials for walls,
roads, lawns, gardens, and garden
furniture are kept in the reference
room. A large blue print machine of
the latest type, completes the equip-
ment of the draughting room, while
there are kept more than 3200 lantern
slides in the slide room of the general
lecture hall.
Although the landscape design de-
partment is the youngest on the cam-
pus, having been established in 1909,
when Prof. Aubrey Tealdi took the
chair, it has made remarkable pro-
gress since its beginning. More than
100 students are counted among those,
now studying in the department, an
increase of about 30 per cent having
occurred within the last year. Of
these the majority of the advanced stu-
dents have come from other states and
colleges to pursue specialized studies
along gardening lines, and while there
are 13 courses offered during the reg-
ular session, fully as many are en-
rolled in the two courses, given dur-
ing summer school. This semester a
new course in flower garden design-
ing has been added to the general cur-
riculum, while for the next semester,
it is planned to offer another course
in plant materials.
Much of the added interest in the
work of landscape designing is at-
tributed to the fact that, as there is
much more of that kind of work being
done in recent years, there are greater
opportunities in such a line of en-
deavor than ever before. In this con-
sideration, Ann Arbor is not without
its share of construction. During the
last year, there have been several
large contracts awarded, and even
now, there are about a dozen big jobs

From the tentative form in which
it appeared three years ago, the point
system of the Women's League has
now evolved into a practical and effl-
cient means of guiding the individual
college activities of the women on
the campus. To Harriet Williams
Waite, '14L, and a few associates be-
long the credit of the introduction of
the system. Briefly stated, it limits
the number of activities in which a
woman may take part at one time.
To these ends each recognized ac-
tivity is given a certain value in
points and no student is allowed to
assume more than ten points at any
one time or a total of twelve points
in one semester.
The president of the Women's
League receives 7 points, the presi-
dent of Y. W. C. A. 6, the women's
editor of The Daily, the vice-president
of the league and the chairmen of
various committees, 5 points !each.
Other activities receive a varying
number of points, depending upon the
time and effort which they require.
From time to time the number of
points has been changed, as experi-
ence has taught that the positions
were under or over rated.
The administration ofthe system
is in, the hands of a committee of
which Marian Williams, '18, is chair-
man, composed of members of the
league, and a member of the univer-
sity senate, that member being Prof.
Charles B. Vibbert.
State Health Board Field Agent Here
Miss Elizabeth Parker, of Lansing,
field agent for the organization of
work under the state board of health
was in Ann Arbor last Monday. Her
purpose in this city was to confer with
Miss Carol Walton, state secretary of
the anti-tuberculosis association, re-
garding the forming of plans for the
work of the association for the com-
ing year. Tuesday, she left for Ben-
ton Harbor where she expects to or-
ganize a society to carry on the work
of the association in Berrien county.

-~
- - .
w .t '--t.. .. ....i
--.
When you buy a
shoe you have it fitted
and you take it because =
Sit looks well and feels
comfortable.
But a careful selec-
- tion of your corset is z
much more important.
You must feel com-
fortable - and your
corset must form a
fashionable smooth
base for your gown.
Back Lace Front Lace
are designed with in-
finite care for every
type of figure, and nat-
urally the best of fa-
0 brics, boning and other
materials is used in their
design, for they are
high class corsets.
But a Redfern is not
S an indulgence. It is a
healthful safeguard.
You will find it all you
expect the best corset to y
be-comfortable, fash-
ionable and serviceable.
From Three Dollars Up
FOR SALE BY E
-

--7Mmqwidthof
fckmeasure
hen a worthy
man dies, his
relatives rest
his remains in a plush-
lined box-built es
pecially to the'dimen-
sions of his "silent
shell."
Rather a morbid re-
minder, perhaps. Still,
if a soulless shell is
entitled to made-to-
measure considerati,
how much more so is
a live, throbbing and
moving personality.
Why not have your
new suit built to your
order; built to your
body and your taste?
Why not have it
Royal Tailored to.
your order at $18.50
to $40.00? Why not?

0

tit
ROYAL
MALOMS

Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. 18-tf

F,

I .

eacy and it is undjubtedly
becaxe. of this tht we are
tura,ted wvi'h gold to .n extert

sa

re it is almost losing its character
blessing.
was rrcently coml uted that to-
er with our demest c producti.a,
total stock of gold in the Unit l
es had increased in the last twen-
x months by $750,000,000, ant .+
beginning of this month amounted
$2,636,000,000. Of this increasel
$400,000,000 has been accumu-
I so far this year, and the indica-
s are that this amount vill be
her swelled in the remaining1
ths of the year.
HIBIT OIL. PAINTINGS,
lay Inclue'es Work e 'oderm and
(ld Masters,
n exhibitica of fine oil paintings
iding both the work. of the mod-
and old masters is beir held this
k at De Fries art store. The col-
.on has been loaned by Jas. E.'
na & Bros.~ of Detroit.
ie display contains a great variety
paintings depicting almost every
e of life. Dutch artifts are in
ominance, though a few Ameri-
are represented. The best pic-
by an American is the one by
Liam Watson entitled "Evening on
Moors," which clearly and dis-
bly presents the artist's idea, and'
he same time givs proof to the
.ter's knowledge of technique.
dutch Interior" by Bernard De-
g is the most conspicuous piece
it in the collection. It is the
'esentation of the pure, homelyl
of the Dutch people, and vividly
rays the simple atmosphere that
ounds them. A mother and her
I occupy the center of the picture
rly representing the artist's con-
ion of a mother's love.

the pricy of wheat so gromt that J:mes
A. Patton is reported as saying prices
may advance from $2.40 to $2.60 per
')ushel.
With thin hnmp c, :'vin; cos's wa-es
a e mvade but lit'e ga n and i I the
case of unorganized labor the cffect
has been unusually severe, How the
dissatLfaction wIh these high prices
will manifest itself in practice can-
uct be positi'cly predicted but un-
doubtedly the cuzstom the European
countries ha-e ret of controlling food
supplic and fixing prices of the prin-
cipal articles will sooner or later
find favor here. Nevertheless one in-
dication of this unrest is to be found
r, t he number of strikes. Dur-
ing thn eight months of 1916 the num-
ber has beten 2,32ii. During 1915 the
bRa,3 6:13. Pho-Vwere about
20 different causes for these strikes,
the Lrgc~t ;.u._ ber, about one-quar-
:er z~v n f,) ia uase no wages.
Shorter hours, demands for recogni-
tion of the union, and the hiring of
non-union mean were among the other
reasons. However, the present de-
crease in the number of strikes seems
to indicate that adjustment to the
present scale of coAt of liring has

under actual construction, one of them
costing more than $10,000. The Uni-
versity of Chicago has no department
of this kind, and in Lake Forest, where
many of the largest and wealthiest
estates of America are located, land-
scape design is studied only in the
summer, when society girls along the
shore secure the services of a faculty
man from one of the eastern schools
to give them a few pointers in plan-
ning gardens.
Professor Tealdi is a graduate of
the Royal Technical Institute, of
Livorno, Italy, and has had consider-
able practical experience throughout
Europe and the United States. Be-
fore accepting the chair at the Uni-
versity, Professor Tealdi was designer
for the largest landscape design firm
in the country.

CAMPU'S BOOTERY

For Sale By

308 S. State St.
Authorized Dealer
..4. for

E
t

I

To

Vote D RY Nov.

7

You Must Vote
On Two Ballots

Vote "Y E S" On the State Prohibition Ballot

"YES" on
Art. XVI

THIS IS THE AMENDMENT TO ARTICLE XVI.

THIS IS THE AMENDMENT NOW IN
STATES.

FORCE

IN 19 PROHIBITION

168 SAVINGS BANKS IN NORTH CAROLINA UNDER THIS LAW RE-

been reached.
In the business world opposition to
the rise seems to be regard'-d as use-
less and buyers are taking goods as
they can get them. The seller seems
to be doing the resisting cutting down
quantity and reducing the demand.
This is due in part to the impossibility
of filling orders that continue to rush
in. Credits also are carefully exam-
ined with the view of cutting out all
risks. However, obligations are usual-
ly met with promptness and failures
are the lowest for the month since
1912.
Our alarm clocks are good clocks.
Chapman, Jeweler, 118 South Main
street. tues-eod

PORT INCREASED SAVINVGS AND IMPROVED
ECONOMIC CONDITIONS DUE TO PROHIBITION.

MORAL

AND

Vote "N O" on the Saloon amendment to Article VIII

"NO" on
Art. VIII

THIS IS THE LAW THAT HAS PUT BOLD, DEFIANT AND LAW-
VIOLATING SALOONS IN OHIO, INDIANA AND OTHER STATES.
IF THIS AMENDMENT IS NOT DEFEATED IT WILL REPEAL THE
PRESENT COUNTY OPTION LAW, MAKE OF NO EFFECT YOUR
VOTE FOR PROHIBITION AND PUT MICHIGAN AMONG THE
SALOON STATES.
Washtenaw Dry Campaign Committee

F-

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