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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1916 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Classical Study in Japan Formed
Foundation of Modern Ne

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of Men's

Suits,

Hats

Caps and

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CL. SSICAIL STI)Y IN JAPAN
by Sotokichii Katsuizumi
In order to understand the present
educational system in Japan, we must
trace the history of Japan. As early
as the eighth century, A. D., when the
influence of Buddhism and Confucian-

Sotokichii Katsuizuni, '17, of Tsubata Kaga, Japan, contri-
butes the' second of a series of ar ticles by foreign students about
some phase of their native lands.

State St, Store
Nickels Arcade

" I ,

-.a
Your Floral Needs=
Are BEST SA I SFIED By Us
PhONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plant
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION

ism, were young and vital, the na-
tional educational system was firmly
established. The great Charlemagne's
Ordinance of Education and the
founding of Oxford were far later
than the foundation of classical edu-
cation in Japan.
During the time that they cail the
golden age of Nara, and Heian, the
higher classes of Japanese society
studied the Chinese Classics almost
exclusively. Many students were
sent to study the Chinese civilization
and many books and verses were writ-
ten in Chinese language as the Euro-
pean monastaries in the medevial
period wrote theirs in Latin, the most
cultured laguage of the lands.
All through the age of military su-
premacy from the fourteenth century
down to the middle of the sixteenth
century, the educational idea con-
ceived by Buddhism and Confucianism
in the previous epoch was somewhat
weakened. The priests and very few
scholars only were buried in the piles
of books under the dim light of wax
and plant-seed oil.

thought in the passages, as fragments
of gold in sand. That is to say, Plato
was greatly influenced by his master
and Plato was a mouthpiece of his
master.
In short, classical study in Japan in
the pre-restoration period was the
foundation of modern Japan. And
moderm Japan adds a new western ele-
ment to cultivate the coming genera-
tion of the nation.
SEES SERIOUS MENACE
IN SHORTAGE OF COAL
Lack of Railroad Cars to Carry Com-
modity Reported; None Stored
at Mines

New Fall Neckwear, Hats
and Underwear
VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP

There are reasons more
than one why you
should buy a
Society Bran d
Suit and Overcoat
You'll be convinceds we are
right when you look these
garments over.
J. F. uerth o.
Next t. Orpheum

WE DO

TYPEWRITING
MULTIGRAPHING
MIMEOGR APHIN(
Typewrit-rs for sale or rent.

1107 So. Univ.

-=COUAINS & hALL
1002 S. UNIV JSiTV AVE.

This .Store aias to erve it's
PATRONS WELL=
To give the best value possible
for the lowest price possible is the best service any slore can
render.

Washington, Oct. 31. - The coal
shortage situation today began to as-
sume the proportion of a real menace.
Reports are reaching Washington from
many industrial centers of inability to
obtain normal coal supplies. With the
greatest industrial activity the country
has ever known keeping factories and
blast furnaces on 24-hour service, and
the railroads facing the greatest traf-
fic in their history, an unheard of de-
mand has arisen, according to the au-
thorities here.
Coupled with this immense demand,
the railroads with all available facil-
ities working at maximum, are facing,
according to reports by the interstate
commerce commission, the worst car.
shortage they have ever experienced.
As an aggravation of the situation
the mines have a tendency, according
to coal experts of the United States
geological survey, to limit their pro-
duction to the capacity of the car-
riers which haul the coal from their
mines. Practically no coal, it was as-
serted, is stored at mines to await
transportation.

Hamilton Bsiess Colleg

Standard flexible arm Study t imp -
For short time only
W s ht73aw Electri Sop
hone 73200 Washlng;o ii t. Enst

SPECIAL $2.75

Ta i 4' .'. ^'.iy Y .... . __. y"_,"'SE:.",^'°t: Gi

our' torm-PRo of trosler
Makes the Rowdiest Wind Behave

Women's and Children's Apparel

/c

Main and Liberty $ts.

F. . _ _ ,,

The
Cyc-Carpus Juris
System

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co.
27 Cedar Streetw
NEW YORK
CHOP offafew.
minutes and eat some of
GEORGE'S S E
WAI KING LO
314 S. State St. Phone t144-IM
U. S. STEEL CORPORATION
DECLARES EXTRA DIVIDEND
New York, Oct. 31.-The Tnited
States Steel corporation this afternoon
declaired an extra dividend of one per
cent on its common stock. Net earn-
ings for the last quarter were $85,-
817,067 against $81,126,048 the previous
quarter. Several days ago brokers
were betting steel earnings for the
quarter would be $95,000,000. Today
Wall street estimates were $85,000,000
to $90,000,000.

MARLE~Y 2fr4 IN.
D 5EV ON 2j IN-
15 ctes each, 6 for 0Cis.
CLUETT, PEABODY & CO., INC. MAKERS
Cii ICAL SOCIi"TY PROGRAM
GIdlVN TO..16IGT IN HOSPITAL
The Clinical society of the Univer-
sity has provided an interesting pro-
gram for the members at 7:30 o'clock
this evening at the medical amphi-
theater in the University hospital. Dr.
Carl D. Camp, -president of the organi-
zation, will preside over the meeting.
Refreshments will be served at the
internes' home at 9:30 o'clock.
Pro'. Parker to Speak in Chicago
Prof. John C. Parker, of the depart-
ment of electrical engineering, has been
invited to give an address early in No-
vember before the Bond Salesmen's
club of Chicago. His subject will be
"The Relation of the Engineer and
Banker in Connection With Capitaliza-
tion of Public Utilities."

Classical Study Begins
The peaceful minds of the people
were brought back once more in the
glorious era of Takugawa Shogun.
The classical study regained its ter-
ritory throughout the country in all
classes of society. In other words, the
Japanese in the pre-restoration period
had more than, three R's in their cur-
ricilum, especially above the middle
class, the children of Samnmuri were
required to study the sacred books of
Confucius. There then developed the
ethical code of Bushi, the knight.
The classical studies, during the To-
kugawa period from the seventeenth
century down to middle of the nine-
teenth century, produced the flowers
of chivalry, as the beautiful roses of
Europe bloomed in the period of
feudalism in Europe.
The visit made by the angel of
peace, Commodore Perry, opened a
new era in Japan. Classical educa-
tion also opened its doors. As soon as
Japan gave up the old idea in' the ed-
ucational system, she adopted new
methods from the West. This was
the period of restoration, an era of
transition from metaphysics to ma-
terialism, from the classical to utili-
tarianism.

.. x

Manager Blames Railroads.
Chicago, Oct. 31.-C. R. Campbell,
general manager of the Commerce
Coal company, the largest in the mid-
dle west, today stated that the real
cause of the coal shortage in the cen-
tral west is a shortage of railroad cars.
"Miners are forced to quit work three
and four days a week owing to this
car shortage," said Campbell. Prices
quoted today do not indicate an acute
condition in the middle west. Soft coal
is up 25 cents to 75 cents a ton over
last October, while anthracite is up
from 65 cents to $1.15 per ton. The
highest grades are selling at $9.50, de-
livered.

Also take a look'at our "Pinch
Back" Model priced at $20 to $25.00.

We will be pleased to show you
the different models at any time,
We and the makers of these Over-
coats stand back of these garments

Here's a big, boxy, belted Storm
Overcoat that gives you a bear-like
hug of warmth without surrender-
ing one iota of smart style.

in every particular.

New Fields Opened
lDid the new idea from the western
countries really sweep away the old
classical studies in Japan? No. After
some consideration, the educators in
the modern Japan, not only revived
the studies of Confucius in their high
schools and colleges but they opened
up a new field and introduced the
Greek philosophers into the curri-
culum.
At present, classical study in Japan
is enriched by adding the Greek
classics to, their colleges and univer-
sities. Socrates is known among the
students in Japan more than Plato
and Aristotle. A number of years ago
all of Plato's work was translated
into Japanese from the original works.
The Roman philosophers are very
little known among them. But the
character that most appeals, to them
is that glorious stoic philosopher
Epictetus. That is because his career
more or less resembled those sages in
China of about the time of Confucius,
who studied the books under the light
of fireflies in summer and a pile of
snow near the window on the winter
elves.
Plato Influential
One of the most learned men in
Japan said recently that whenever he
reads Plato he can find out Socrates'
Does your musical instrument need
repairs? Take it to Schaeberle & Son,
110 South Main street, for first-classI
work. oct3tfI

TODAY
TIj ests---Vaudevile.

* * * * * * * * *
AT THE THEATE

Orpheum - Dorothy Gish and
Owen Moore in "Susan Rocks
the Boat." Also Triangle Com-
edy, Fred Mace in "Bathtub
Perils."
Arcade - Frances Nelson and
Arthur Ashley in "The Re-
volt."
* * - *

* "
RS

k
k
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
.*

Jt ol"eY
randegee-Kincaid Clothes

Just received another new assort-
ment of late patterns in soft shirts,
Fibers, Silks and Madras materials.

with collar attached.

Tinkr & Corn pany
Clothes, Furnishings and Hats
For
Particular Men.
Cor. state an~d William Sts.

LOST.
LOST-Grey suede glove, right hand,
Updegraf make, size 8 1-2, silk lin-
ing. Lost on North State or South
Thompson. Please return to Daily
office or 7018 Lawrence. nov.
LOST - Pair of light colored bone
rimmed glasses between boat house
and University hospital. Return to'
102 12th St. Reward. Phone 921
Traub. 31
LOST-Student's athletic coupon book
probably at Ferry field, on Saturday.
Please return to The Daily office.
llewvard. novl

See our new white Oxford shirt

ITYPEWUITEItS of all makes
bought, sold, rented or ex-
chaniged. Expert repairing,
actory service. Sole agent Under-
wood & Corona. TYPEWRITING,
IMEOGRAPIING & SUPPLIES.
0. 1). )IO1IiLL, 322 . State Sty
(Over Bal iuore Iunch). 582-J.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Singlexroom. Enquire at
71'j Church or Alpha Delta Phi
house. oct.21-27
FOR RENT-Single room. 439 S. Di-
visin. Phone i220-R. 31-N.1-2
FOUN - - Overcoat, Daines Studio.
Owner can have same by paying for
this advertisement, novi

AT THE WHITNEY
Because of many requests on the
part of patrons, "Ann Arbor Days" in
motion pictures will be shown again
at the Whitney theater Wednesday,
Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday even-
ings at 8 o'clock. The doors of the
theater open at 7:30 o'clock.
Through the courtesy of the Ford
Motor company, motion pictures of the
Michigan-M. A. C. game will be shown.
The picture comprises over 500 feet of
film.
AT THE MAJESTIC
Picturesque scenic settings are pos-
sible in "The Girl Worth While," the
new Boyle Woolfolk musical show
which will soon be seen in Michigan.
The story finds action amid the beau-
tiful dells of Wisconsin, one of Ameri-
ca's favorite vacation spots. Primrose

Semon, a Kalamazoo girl, plays the
title role.
An interesting sample of the fa-
mous Dervish dances of Arabia will be
presented by Onetta, the whirlwind
danseuse, who has been booked to ap-
pear at the Majestic. Onetta adds the
spice of variety to her act by poising
a chair above her head, held only be-

Health

FEW STUDENTS VACCINAT

Servie l~g" i T

The University health service
partment as disapointet in the r:
for vaccin ations yestrday mormi

tween her teeth, while she~spins in a,
mad whirl.
U. S. Will Probe Disasters on Lakes

'he smallpox care
made little impn sien

Seels to hao
On the0 student

Washington, Oct. 31. - Secretary
Redfield announced today that the
steam boat inspection service -will
make a thorough investigation of
wrecks during the recent storm on
the Great Lakes.
Cost of Patriotism Also Increasing
Washington, Oct. 31.-Now it's the
high cost of patriotism! Flags are
going up. Washington dealers have
boosted prices to this general degree:
Cotton flags, 50 per cent; bunting
flags, 75 per cent, and silk flags, 100
per cent.

.

LOST-On Hill street between Olivia
and Forest avenues Saturday after-
noon, a crank for Buick car. Finder
please phone 771. novi
LOST,-Let the Michigan Daily find
that lost article of yours through
one of its classified advertisementj

November Victor Records
Are On Sale Today!
Phone us your order for Approval!
Try them out in your home.
rlt#'116 5. Malt% St.
r nell PHONE 1707

for only 1) men showcd up at the de
partmcnt to be vacv mad
The disease is con aious and the
health service recommends that thos4
students who have not been vaccintet
within the last five years take another
treatment. Ali students will be treat.
ed free of cost at the health service to
avoid an epidemic of smallpox in
this community and those desiring vac-
cination are 1ur;'ed to )take advaintag'
of this prec as soon as possible
Pope Denies Separate Peace Rumors
Rome, Oct. 31.--The Vatican yester-
day emphatically denied Swiss rumors
that Pope Bene ict was negotiating at
early peace between Austria andI.us-
sla.
Woodvard repairs typewriters. 8-
A. A. Say. Bnk. Bldg. Tel. 866-Fl.

WANTED.
WANED-DressmakIng. 706 South
12th street. 27-2 incl

Woodward

sells Remington Type-

III

Nriters. 8-9 A. A. Sav. Bnk. Bldg. Tel.
866-Fi.

I., 'I

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