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November 01, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-11-01

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E WEATHER
ANN ARBOR-
RAIN AND
WARMER

I CA

.

UNITED PRESS X
DAY AND NIGHT SERV
THE ONLY MORNING PAP
ANN ARBOR

I

A

L.

VOL. XXVII. No. 26. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1916. PRICE FIVE

HUGHES SUPPORTS
RIGHT TO TRAVEL
AGAINST HECKLER
TELLS QUESTIONER HE FAVORS
MAINTENANCE OF ALL
RIGHTS
URGES FIRMNESS OF POLICY
Wants America "Standing for Its Own
Rights," Asking Only
for Justice
By rercy Arnold
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Columbus, Ind., Oct. 31.-Heckled
by a spectator who said he was a
"personal admirer," Governor Hughes
today declared, in answer to a qu'es-
tion of whether he would favor or op-
pose an embargo against shipment of
munitions, or the passage of the Mc-
Lemore ,resolution:
"I am in favor of the maintenance
of every right, including the right to
travel and the right of shipment. It
is a very important right that we have
as-a neutral nation, and it is very im-
portant at this time. When the great
war is raging we should vindicate
neutral rights and maintain the in-
tegrity of international law.
"To my mind it is a very thoughtless
policy that would surrender any of
these important rights because of any
sentimental consideration, when we
have the vast necessity of neutral com-
merce, and the importance of the
rights of neutralsrto consider, with re-
spect to the future of the United
States.
"What we want is an America stand-
ing for its own rights, facing the
world with a sense of justice, asking
naught but that to which it is entitled.
We need an America four squared to
the world, commending itself by the
firmness and consistency of its policy,
vindicating the principles of interna-
tional law, and showing itself to all as
the champion of the rights of neu-
tras.
DISCOVER COAL IN ARGENTINA
Extensive 1)eposits Found in Province
of San Juan; Quality Good
(By United Press.)
Buenos Aires, Oct. 31.-(Special.)-
The discovery is reported of extensive
coal deposits in the Argentine prov-
ince of San Juan. The statement is
made that it is nearly as good as the
best quality of Welsh coal. Experts
have not yet had a chance, however,
to make a test as to quality or to de-
termine the extent of the fields. 'Coal
would prove of immense importance to
Argentina, which is prevented from
becoming a great industrial country by
lack of cheap fuel.
CONTEST FOR NEW MICHIGAN
CHEERS CLOSES THURSDAY
The cheer contest now being con-
ducted by The Michigan Daily will
close Thursday at 4 o'clock instead of
6 o'clock. A prize of $10 has been of-
fered by F. J. Scully, '12, for new
Michigan cheers. The contributions
are being turned over to the board of
directors of the athletic association.
The results will be announced in The
Daily not later than Saturday morning.
Three prizes will be given, a first of
$5.00, a second of $3.0, and a third of
$2.00. All contributions should be ad-
dressed to the "Cheer Editor" of The

Michigan Daily.
Wilson Supporters Ask 8 to 10 Odds
New York, Oct. 31.-Odds of ten to
nine offered by Hughes supporters and
eight to ten asked by Wilson support-
ers were reported in the financial dis-
trict this afternoon. Five thousand
dollars was reported wagered even
that Whitman will carry New York by
100,000.

Figures Dance
at Band Boost
That most astute lexicographer,.Mr.
Noah Webster, has painstakingly set
forth 17 definitions of the word "fig-
ure," everyone of which can be made
to apply to the act of Helen Champion
and company, "Algebraic Antics,"
which. holds one of the leading posi-
tions on the program of the Band
Boost.M
Thirteen women, attired in appro-
priate costumes and bearing huge fig-
ures go through .the mazes of an
aesthetic dance and in so doing solve
a problem in simultaneous equation.
The slender plot is woven about the
dreams that haunt a tired professor of
mathematics who has fallen asleep
while marking his bluebooks.
Those who will figure in the present-
ation are: Genevieve O'Leary, '17,
Helen McAndrew, '19, Lavinia Mc-
Bride, '18, Mildred Crissey, '17, Clara
Jones, '17, Harriet Walker, '17, Kath-
ryn Shay, '17, Amy Nelson, '17, Julia
van Leeuvwen, '17, Kathryn Grant, '19,
Phyllis Egglestone, '19, Mary Rosevelt,
'17, Emily Mack, '19, and Helen Cham-
pion, '17.
All is in readiness for the first dress
rehearsal to be held this evening,
while those who have in hand the dis-
posing of the admittance cards report
a steady sale. The tickets may be
had at the Union, Busy Bee, Huston's,
Allman and Forsythe, Foster's, and the
Majestic billard parlors. Several other
stations will be added to the list some-
time today.
Aeronaut Visits
Ann Arbor Today
Beginning today, Ann Arbor will
once again be the scene of aeroplane
activities.
Don McGee, of Saginaw, the aero-
naut who performed for the benefit of
the patrons at the Michigan-Syracuse
game, is due from Detroit this morn-
ing. McGee had several appointments
in the City of the Straits to take pas-
sengers up into the clouds, but he ex-
pected to return to Ann Arbor today.
McGee spent a busy day in Ann Ar-
bor on Sunday, carrying passengers
during the morning and afternon. He
is booked almost solid for the next
two days and may remain over until
thesfirst part of next week.
BOLIVAR STATE TURNS DOWN
PLAN FOR HEALTH STATION
(By United Press.)
Bogota, Oct. 31.-Newspaper com-
ment from the whole of Colombia
shows the entire country agreed on
approval of the Cartagena chamber of
commerce's rejection of the United
Fruit gompany's request for permis-
sion to establish a health station on
the coast of Bolivar province, inde-
pendently of those maintained by the
Colombian government.
The company, in a diplomatic note
to Bolivar state, represented that the
Panama health authorities persist in
quarantining United Fruit steamships
from Colombian ports, regardless of
the clean bills granted by the Colom-
bian officials. It was for this reason
that the concern professed to want a
Colombian station presided over by
medical experts from the United
States.
The Colombian view is that the re-
quest was part of a "pin prick" policy
by the United Fruit company, due to
the fact that Colombian capital has re-
cently put two steamships in commis-
sion on the Atlantic and one on the

Pacific coast in competition with the
United Fruit liners. It is stated also
that the United Fruit company has
made a 40 per cent reduction in rates
to meet this competition.
Wisconsin Plans Union Building
Madison, Wis., Oct. 31.-A movement
is being started to provide a union
building for University of Wisconsin
students and alumni.

MICHGANWOMEN
POSSESSFREEDOM
National Y. W. C. A. Student Secretary
Believes Independent Spirit
Is Striking Quality
UNIVERSITY IS SELF-CENTERED
"Intellectual freedom is a marked
characteristic of the women of this
University," said Miss Leslie Blanch-
ard, the national student secretary of
the Y. W. C. A., to a representative
of The Daily yesterday. "It- is a free-
dom which might easily develop into
an excess of self-assertiveness in some!
cases. The independent spirit is cer-
tainly the most striking squality of!
Michigan women as a whole."
In speaking of her investigation of
the problems of student associations in
state universities, Miss Blanchard fur-
ther observed, "Michigan is an ex-
tremely self-centered school, almost
oblivious of the existence of the other
middle western colleges. This state
of affairs may probably be attributed
to the venerable position which Michi-
gan enjoys, to her inability to forget
that she was once the only great uni-
versity west of the Alleghanies, and
also, perhaps, to her lack of inter-
course, athletic and otherwise, with her
neighbors to the west."
Miss Blanchard, who is visiting Ann
Arbor for the purpose of studying the
Y. W. C. A. here as compared with
those of other state universities, rep-
resents the national board of the as-
sociation with headquarters in New
York. As a graduate of Leland Stan-
ford Jr. University, she is familiar
with conditions in the far west and is
now investigating the group of col-
leges to which Michigan belongs.
Poet Will Read
From Own Works
Richard LeGallienne, the distingu-
ished English poet, will lecture on
Thursday, Nov. 2, at 8 o'clock, in Uni-
versity Hall. Mr. LeGallienne is ap-
pearing under the auspices of the
Oratorical association, this being his
first visit to Ann Arbor.
The program will consist entirely of
readings of his own works. Mr. Le
Gallienne is recognized all over the
world as a poet of exceptional talent,
being best known as a lyric poet. He
has written much prose, however, and
at the present time is preparing a
book similar to "Treasure Island,"
using a house boat on the Connecticut
river for that purpose.
TECHNIC'S FIRST ISSUE GOES
ON SALE TOMORROW AT NOON
AA article on "Air Craft Motors,"
by 0. E. Hunt of the Packard Motor
company, is the leader in the first is-
sue of the Michigan Technic, which
will go on sale Thursday noon. Prof.
.W H. King is the author of another
article on "The Flow of Water Over
V-Notch Weirs." The latter is said to
be a valuable contribution to the sub-
ject of hydraulics, while Mr. Hunt's
article is an authoritative discussion
of the latest field for gasoline motors.
A considerable portion of the maga-
zine has been devoted to the Michigan
campus, while the engineering gradu-
ates also come in for their share of
attention.

FRESH PHARMIC CLASS ELECTS
E. C. WATTS TO PRESIDENCY
Fresh pharmics yesterday elected
the following members of their class
as officers for the coming year:
President, E. C. Watts; vice-presi-
dent, Irma M. Neumann; secretary, H.
C. Storick; treasurer, E. W. Grunow;
athletic manager, N. C. Fliegel.

Where Six Interested Men Will
Watch for Fall Efection Returns
New York, Oct. 31.-One week from today the voters of the country
will have their voice in the campaign. The various candidates will
receive returns next Tuesday night as follows:
President Wilson at Shadow Lawn, the summer White House.
Charles E. Hughes in New York, probably at the Astor hotel.
Allan L. Benson at his home in Yonkers.
J. Frank Hanly at his home in Indianapolis.
Vice-President Marshall probably at his home in Indianapolis.
Charles W. Fairbanks at his home in Indianapolis.

BERLIN REPORTS CHECK
OF FRENCHON SOMME
Light Attacks Repulsed Easily; Little
Activity on Western
War Front
Berlin, Oct. 31.-The Crown Prince
Rupprecht's army on the Somme front
has effectually stopped several light
French attacks. At no point were the
actions favorable to the enemy. Enemy
detachments who advanced against
German positions northeast and east
of Les Bouess were driven back by
German fire. At La Maisonette, French
attacks likewise failed.
At this point attempts were inef-
fectually made to enter new German
trenches following bombing south of
Biaches. The Verdun front during the
past 24 hours experienced unusual
quiet. Only in the St. Mihiel district
was real action seen. Onthe Meuse
front the artillery fire was recently in-
creased to great violence.
Petrograd, Oct. 31. - Roumanian
forces continued to drive the Austro-
Germans northward in the Jiu valley,
and have taken 300 prisoners and four
machine guns, it was officially an-
nounced today.
Berlin, Oct. 31.-General von Falk.
enhayn's forces have captured 151
Roumanian officers and 9,920 men
since Oct. 10. Booty includes 37 can-
non, 47 machine guns, one flag, and
much other war material.
Paris, Oct. 31.-Italian artillery dis-
persed Bulgarian troops northeast of
Doriyan today. West of Prestle lake
French troops occupied the Singieri
monastery. On the Cerna front the
Serbians were declared to be making
further progress. '
PREPARE "TE XAGIC CARPET"
Cosmopolitan Club Plans Try-Outs for
Play; Announce Cast Soon
The board of control of the Cosmo-
politan club has put this year's pro-
duction, "The Magic Carpet," in the
hands of a committee of three. Gen-
eral Manager, H. Gilbert King, '18;
business manager, R. Forsyth House-
man, '19; )production manager, Prof. J.
Raleigh Nelson. Aliss Alice Evans,
physical director of the Barbour gym-
nasium, will direct the dancing.
Special music will be written and an
orchestra organized and conducted by
Abraham J. Gornetzky, '17, writer of
the majority of last year's opera music.
Triy-outs for- the production will be
held this Friday from 3 to 5 o'clock in
MacMillan hall, and the cast will be
announced the first of next week.
SENATOR TOWNSEND SPEAKS
BEFORE REPUBLICANS TONIGHT
The Hon. Charles E. Townsend,
United States senator from Michigan,
will be the speaker at a Republican
rally to be held at 7:30 o'clock to-
night at the Light Guard Armory on
East Ann street.
The Whitney orchestra will furnish
music. Admission is free and ladies
are especially invited to attend.

VACCINATION REQUIRED
OF YPSILNTI STUDENTS
City Health Officer Warns Ann Arbor
Residents Attending Normal
to Be Cautious
Every student of the Michigan State
Normal School of Ypsilanti who is a
resident of Ann Arbor has been
warned by Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city
health officer, to be vaccinated at once.
"We have a list of the names and
addresses of every one of these stu-
dents," said Dr. Wessinger yesterday,
"and we will keep close tab on them
in order to check any outbreak of
smallpox, of which there are four
cases among the normal school stu-
dents.
"Ann Arbor is at the present time
remarkably free from contagious dis-
eases," continued Dr. Wessinger.
There is one case of diphtheria at the
University hospital's contagious ward,
and also one case of poliomyelitis or
infantile paralysis. No cases of ty-
phoid fever are known to be outside
of the hospitals. Of the latter, the
University hospital has four, the
Homeopathic hospital one, and St.
Joseph's sanitorium one. The last
outside case of t'yphoid fever, that of
the daughter of Prof. E. W. Dow, of
the history department, was dismissed
Monday.
"The city health survey is now
practically finished. We have found
a great deal of value from the stand-
point of public health and much that
will be useful toward amending and
drafting ordinances to meet the new
conditions. Charts of all sanitary ar-
rangements in the city have been pre-
pared and are accessible at any time
for reference."
NEWBERRY RESIDENCE GIVES
UNIQUE HALLOWE'EN PARTY
Guests Carry Out Program With
Everything Reversed; Put Cart
Before Horse
The girls of Newberry residence in-
troduced something new in the way
of Hallowe'en festivities Monday even-
ing when they gave a "backward
party." Everyone appeared in gar-
ments strangely familiar, but neatly
adjusted hind side before, good old
songs were sung backward, partners
one-stepped back to back, and the cart
was put before the horse in every pos-
sible manner. Dean Myra B. Jordan
bowed her acknowledgement of the ap-
plause which greeted her appearance
by leaning over backward.
Fortunes were told with cards by
Miss Agnes Wells, social director, and
with the less occult art of palmistry
by Margaret Barlow, '20, which indi-
cated fertile imaginations at work
somewhere. The freshmen of different
floors strove with tooth, and some-
times contrary to the rules, with nail,
for the possession of apples hung on
strings, to the vast amusement of their
elders. And when the contestants and
the apples were exhausted, the party
concluded with a dance in the dining
room.

SUPPORT WILSON
FORRE-ELECTIO.
MEMBERS OF BULL MOOSE RESO
LUTIONS COMMITTEE SIGN
STATEMENT
FURTHER PARTY PRINCIPLE
Call Attention of Public to "Unpar
alleled Achievements" During
Past Four Years
New York, Oct. 31.--"Without a can-
didate of our own for president, we
are unalterably in favor of the reten
tion in office of President Wilson, un-
der whose guidance and leadershi
more progressive principles have
been enacted into law than we be-
lieve might have been accomplished
had the Progressive party been ir
power."
The above endorsement of Presiden
Wilson was contained today In a state-
ment signed by 11 of the 19 members
of the bull moose resolution commit-
tee that drafted the Progressive plat-
form in Chicago.
Five of the remaining members, sail
by Democratic managers to be in ac-
cord with the sentiments of the ful
statement, refrained from naming a
presidential choice. The statemen
said:
"We the undersigned members o
the resolution committee that frame
the platform of the Progressive party
on Aug. 7, -1912, do hereby re-affirmi
our unswerving allegiance to the Pro.-
gressive principles embodied in this
platform, and do herewith call the at-
tention of the American people. to the
unparalleled achievements of progres.
sive legislation secured during the
last four years.
"Of 33 planks in the Progressive
platform of 1912, 22 have been wholly
or in part enacted into law. Of 8
propositions embodied in these planks
more than one-half have been carried
out by administration acts or by laws.'
Then the statement names some ex-
amples of such legislation -and con-
tinues, "this is a great national crisis
We are progressive, supporting John
M. Parker of Louisiana for vice-presi-
dent." The statement ends with the
endorsement of Wilson.
FOOTBALL MOVIES AT WHITNE
Ford Motor Company Loans M. A. C
Film to Precede "Ann Arbor Days"
Pictures of the M. A. C. game will
be shown at the Whitney theater to-
night. The demand for the pictures
last week has induced the Whitney
management to re'peat the drama this
week.
"The M. A. C. pictures were secured
through the courtesy of the Ford Mo-
tor company," said Ray E. Bassett, o:
the Civic association, under whose
auspices the pictures are given. Ther
will be only one performance on the
nights that the picture is to run bt
this will be over two hours long
There will also be a travelogue o:
"See America First" and a prepated
ness film. Shows will be given to
night, Thursday, Saturday, and Sun
day, at 8 o'clock.
CITY DRINKING WATER STILL
REPORTED QUESTIONABLI

City drinking water is still question
able and will be for another ten days
at least, is the warning issued by Dr
J. A. Wessinger, city health officer.
"Students must not relax in the:
precautions," said Dr. Wessinger yes
terday. "Tests are made every da:
and while the water will not shoe
any dangerous substances present fo
several days in succession, foreign
particles suddenly bob up which mak
the water unsafe."

University Hall
Thursday
Nov. 2

Admission

RICHARD

LE GALLIENNE

25 cents

Under Auspices of the Oratorical Association

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