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October 29, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-29

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UNITED PRESS WIR
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER I
ANN ARBOR

V.

VOL. XXVII. No. 24. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1916. PRICE FIVE CE

VILLA BOTTLES UP
DE FACTO TROOPS
IN CHIHUAHUA gCITY

Bit of Spirited Action Yesterday Against Syracuse Team

CARRANZISTAS MUST FACE
LAW ON HIS OWN
GROUND

OUT-

MICHIGAN STAGES COT E N ME-BACKO 4I
LAST SEVE MUTES OF PAY;
WINS FROMSYRACUSE 14 TO
VARSITY CHANGES STYLE OF ATTACK, USING FORWARD PAVI
AND TURNS APPARENT DEFEAT INTO
THRILLING VICTORY
MAVIBETSCH AND ZEIGER SHARE HONORS OF CONT
Wolverines Delay Action Until Late in Game, Playing Strong on Defer
Victors Unable to Gain Consistently Through Heavy
Line of Orangemen

I

PANCHO MAKES CLEVER MOVE
Bandits Move in Cutting Off Chihuahua
City From South
Strategic
By Webb Miller
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
El Paso, Oct. 28.-Mexican de facto
government troops tonight are prac-
tically bottled up in the immediate
vicinity of Chihuahua City. Without
holding a single town, Pancho Villa,
bandit leader, dominates the entire
state of Chihuahua, according to ad-
vices to United States government
agents here tonight.
This is the effect of the bandit lead-
,r's lightning move in cutting the
Mexican Central railway, thereby iso-
lating the capital from the south. To
attack the bandit chief the Carranza
troops now will be forced to meet
Villa on his own terms and in his own
stronghold.
Expect Raid on Parral.
Carranza officials late today, accord-
ing to an official bulletin from Chihua-
hua City believed that Parral is the
objective of Villa's drive. Before
marching southward Villa left a con-
siderable force west of Chihuahua City,
commanding the Mexican Northwest-
ern railway, to prevent its use by the
de' facto military authorities. That
General Trevino expects Chihuahua
City to be the scene of a decisive bat-
tle is indicated by the hurried con-
struction of a new system of fortifica-
tions around the city.

Come-back! Come-back!!
Who said that word "COME-BACK?"
The man who originated this glorious and descriptive phrase must
have had the 1916 Michigan football team in mind. If he didn't, he ought
to have had.
Michigan and Syracuse played yesterday afternoon on Ferry field and
one of the two contesting aggregations scored 14 points. The other
chalked up 13. The writer, along with some thousands of other Michi-
gan students, suddenly became delirious and bereft of all reason yester-
day afternoon around 4:30 o'clock, and he's just forgotten exactly which
count belongs to which team. Those in doubt are referred to Coach Yost.
It is rumored that he has it straight.

MORRIE DUNNE FENDED OFF IN AN ATTEMPT TO BLOCK MEEHAN'S KICK WHICH RESULTED IN SCORE

NAME WOMEN* FOR
GIRLS' GL[ECLUB

Personnel
After

of Organization Chosen
Try-Outs; Rehearsals
Start Tuesday

MEMBERSHIP IS NOW COMPLETE
The officers of the Girls' Glee club

.a e for the ensuing year are as follows:
Late News Briefs President, Florence Paddock, '17; vice-

Berlin, via Wireless, Oct. 28.-A
Russian destroyer and an armed patrol
boat were attacked by German sub-
marines off the Russian Arctic town
Sipmavalok. They were driven ashore,
set on fire and destroyed, according to
reports reaching Christiania tonight.
Christiania, Oct. 28.-Activities of
German submarines against Norwegian
ships operating in Arctic waters has
increased to such an extent since the
German-Norwegian submarine dispute
that shipping firms today cancelled
practically all sailings through the
White sea.
New York, Oct. 28.-Fairly sizzling
the Sheepshead Bay speedway this
afternoon, Aitken driving a Pougeout
made a new 100-mile automobile rec-
ord in 56 minutes and 27 seconds. Gal-
vin in a Premiere was only 18 seconds
behind him.
CANDY PRICES. PREDICTED TO
ADVANCE IN NEAR FUTURE
New York, Oct. 28.-The high price
of sweetmeats, acetic acid, tartaric
acid, caraway seeds, brown wrapping
paper and silk ribbons used in tying
boxes of candy are destined to advance
the price of all sorts of candy in the
near future. Dealers say that the in-
crease will be due to the cost of ob-
taining accessories to the making of
sweets.
XING GEORGE'S SON HAS-TO
SHIVER OUT OF BED AT 6:45
(By United Press.),
:London, Oct. 28.-Prince George,
fourth son of the king, is undergoing
rigorous training .at the Osborne
Naval Cadet school on the Isle of
Wight. Like the sons of frdinary
tradesmen, the prince has to shiver out'
of bed at 6:45 a. m., and drill and
study the day long. He will be 14
years old Dec. 20.
GERMANS IMPORT LAUREL TO
MAKE ASPHYXIATING GASES
Rome, Oct. 28.-Up to early August
thousands of tons of Italian laurels
found their way into Germany. They
were imported allegedly to make
wreaths for the soldier dead. It has
been learned that the leaves really
were employed in making asphyxiat-
ing gas for use against the allies.

president, Christina Stringer, '17; sec-
retary, Helen Bush, '17; treasurer,
Ruth Butler, '17; librarian, Hilda
Flink, '18; auditor and chairman of
ticket sales, Grace Raynesford, '18;
publicity manager, Mildred Mighell,
'18; attendance committee, Helen
Bush, '17; Olive Wiggins, '18; Marian
Galton, '18.
The personnel of the club follows:
First sopranos-Elsa Apfel, '17; Helen
Bush, '17; Lucy Cannon, '18; Helen
Edmonds, '17; Hilda Flink, '18; Wilt-
rud Hildner, '19; Kathryn Johnson,
'19; Clara Jones, '17; Katherine Kil-
patrick, '19; Emma Knoepp, '17; Ruth
Merriman, '17; Florence Paddack,
.'17; Antrynetta Poel, '19; Grace
Raynesford, '17; Edna Toland, '17;
Olive Wiggins, '19; Amy Nelson, '17.
Second sopranos-Lois Bennallack,
'19; Marian Galton, '18; Olive Hart-
s4g, '17; Euthemia Hildner, '17; Helen
Kruger, '17; Glayds Lynch, '17; Mil-
dred Mighell, '18; Nona Myers, '18;
Genevieve Packard, '17; Eva Sharrow,
'17; Mildred Vorse, '17.
First altos-Helen Ahrens, '18;
Aletha Baldwin, '18; Vera Brown, '18;
Ruth Butler, '17; Margaret Henkel,
'17; Grace Hesse, '17; Louise Irish, '18;
Bernice Kruger, '17; Genette Pixley,
'18; Christina Stringer, '17.
Second altos-Ella Bliss, '18; *Helen
Camins, '18; Gladys Hamilton, '17;
Mildred Hill, '18; Margaret Hurst,
'19; Louise Kreger, '19; Edith Man-
sell, '18; Lois May, '18; Emily Powell,
'19; Olga Shinkman, '17, accompanist.
Regular rehearsals are held at 5
o'clock Tuesday afternoons in Sarah
Caswell hall.
MENORAH TO MEET TONIGHT
Speaker to Discuss "The Jewish Duty
in the Present Crisis"
"The Jewish Duty in the Present
Crisis" is the subject of an address
to be delivered before the, Michigan
Menorah society at its meeting in
Newberry hall at 8 o'clock tonight by
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman, secretary of the
economics department.
Judge Hugo Pam, of the criminal
court of Chicago, has been secured to
address the society on Nov. 19 and
Prof. Edward Chaucey Baldwin of the
University of Illinois for the following
week. Professor Baldwin delivered an
excellent talk before the Menorah so-
ciety last year on "Job.".

Fire, Department
Lowsers. Record
University Company Holds Fire Drill;
Dental Building Scene
of Action
The fire department organihation of
the University eclipsed all former rec-
ords in their fire drill yesterday after-
noon. The scene of the supposed fire
was on the north of the dental build-
ing, four blocks away from the fire
station. The "alarm" was given at
3:30 and 30 seconds later the ladder
wagon left the station, the hose cart
following 40 seconds after the half
hour.
The first ladder was up three min-
utes and 14 seconds after the "alarm,"
and the first hose was coupled to the
hydrant in three minutes and 23 sec-
onds. Last year the first hose was
on the hydrant in five minutes and 45
seconds, and yesterday's record beats
this by two minutes and 22 seconds.
The fire company is thoroughly organ-
ized, being composed of 18 hosemen,
5 laddermen, 18 policemen, 22 salvage-
men, and seven utility men.
STUDENT CONGREGATION MEETS
Jewish Members of University Gather
for First Time This Year
The Jewish Students' congregation,
of the University of Michigan, will
hold its first meeting of the year at
6:45 o'clock tonight, in Newberry hall.
Dr. Leo M. Franklin, of Temple Beth
El, Detroit, will deliver the sermon.
He has chosen as his subject, "The
Jew and the World Crisis."
Congregational singing tonight will
be led by Mr. S. M. Becker, tenor of
the choir of the Detroit place of wor-
ship, and all singing during the year
will be conducted by a special lead-
er. The congregation will hold its
meetings, like last year, in Newberry
hall at 6:45 o'clock every Sunday
evening during the school year.

CHOOSE MANDOLIN
CLUB PERSONNEL
Half of Membership Composed of Last
Year's Players; New Men
Promising
ELECT NEW LEADER THIS WEEK
Prospects for a strong Mandolin club
loom up as the final personnel of the
club is made out. Practically all
parts have been enlarged over last
year and a flute has been added. Over
half of the membership is made up of
last year's players and those entering
new have shown considerable ability
at the try-outs and last week's re-
hearsal. The following is the list of
men and the instrument each will
play:
First mandolin-0. 0. Leininger;
Willis Bredhead, '17E; Wm. C. Allee,
'18L; F. W. Becker, '18; Robert Wheel-
er, '17; A. J. Richards, '17D; J. R. St.
Clair, '19E; J. H. Stevens, '18E; R. S.
IMoore, '18E.
Second Mandolin-Paul Steketee,
'18; L. H. Mattern, '19; C. 0. Thomp-
son, '19; Carl Gingrich, '19E; H. H.
Whittingham, '17E; G. E. Sawyer, '17E.
Third Mandolin-L. F. Laverty, '19;
S. E. Lamb, '17; Wm. L. Underwood,
'18; S. G. Pratt, '18E; E. F. Steketee,
'19
Mandola-L. 0. Aldrich, '17E. Gui-
tar-Philip Carroll, '18E; W. F. Crock-
ett, '17L; D. B. Gardner, '17E; W. 0.
Johnson, '17E; C. S. Seabrook, '17.
Violin-Robert Berman, '19. Flute-
R. M. Kempton, '18M. Cello-Lee N.
Parker, '17. Bass-H. L. Davis, '17.
The successor of Harold Forsythe,
'17. who was elected leader and recent-
ly resigned will be determined this
week. The next rehearsal will be held
at 7 o'clock in University hall.

BurtsL. Standish in his palmiest days
never dared pen one of those attrac-
tive ten cent bits of literature of his
in which a team staged a more spec-
tacular or sensational and unbeliev-
able series of rallies than that which
was enacted by the Michigan football
team yesterday.
At the end of 53 minutes of play, the
scoreboard showed Syracuse leading
13 to 0. It was apparently all over
but the shouting. Shouting, that is,
for Syracuse.
Meehan had just tried another one
of his attempts at a field goal. This
fellow Meehan was busily engaged in
doing this self-same feat about every
three minutes all afternoon, it seemed
to the Michigan contingent. He had
been successful twice, although the
general law of averages would almost
necessitate some such figure as this.
Anyway, he missed and the ball went
in play on the Michigan 20-yard line.
Pat Smith hurled a long pass to
Peach and the end was nailed on the
Syracuse 45-yard line. Pat threw an-
other pass, this one a nice little lady-
like pass, and Maulie made two yards.
Pat threw another one and Maulie was
thrown on the 23-yard line. Zeiger
advanced five yards. Syracuse was
penalized 15 and it was Michigan's
ball on the 8-yard line.
Big Fritz Rehor was called back and
Zeiger got over to hold the ball. It
was a fake, however, and little Zeiger
sprinted all the way over the Syra-
cuse line for a touchdown. Maulie
goaled and the stands grew awfully
interested.
Syracuse braced and the play was
in Michigan territory for a few min-
utes after the kickoff. Then Bull
Dunne intercepted a pass, and he ran
to the 46-yard line. Pat threw an-
other pass to Bull and the big end was
thrown on the 20-yard line. Syracuse
was penalized to their 7-yard line.
Maulie added three yards and the
rooters in the stands were raving
maniacs. Zeiger took the ball him-
self on the next play and crashed his
140 pounds against the somewhat more
impressive 260-pound Syracuse cap-
tain. The Michigan line smeared the
Orange forwards and Zeiger shot over.
The Michigan rooters were all candi-
dates for Pontiac at this juncture and
well they may have been, especially
after Maulie goaled perfectly.
The mere formalities of the game
were observed and the teams lined up
and kicked off, but the game had been
settled.
Don McGee of Saginaw entertained
the rooters with his antics in an aero-
plane during the course of the game.
McGee had two big "M's" beneath his
plane and the Michigan athletic as-
sociation is seriously considering hir-
ing him as a mascot. His salary will
be something like $5,000 a minute, and
if he brings the luck he brought yes-
terday, he'll be dirt cheap at half the
price.
Captain Maulbetsch played wonder-
ful defensive football and his exhibi-
tion of covering punts was perhaps the
best Ferry field has ever seen. Zeiger
played a star game all the way and
perhaps he deserves more credit for
Michigan's victory than any single man
on the team, not even excepting the
illustrious Maulie himself.
Bull Dunne and Peach did nobly

and in fact all of the Wolverines were
playing A-1 .football after they got
started.
Hereafter, however, they please will
not delay this action until so late in
the game. It is dangerous and alto-
gether too trying on the nerves of the
men in the stand. Varsity, take heed.
Lineup and summaries follow:
Michigan (14) Syracuse (13)'
Dunne.........L.E......Rutstein
Wieman.......L.T..........Cobb
Gracey-Boyd.....L.G......White (C)
Niemann..........C......... Gilmore
Rehor-Goodsell. .R.G......... Trigg
Weske...........R.T........... Segal
Peach-Martens...R.E.Du Moe-Sparfeld
ISparks-Zeiger.....Q........Meehan
Maulbetsch.....L.H.. Planck-Wright
Raymond-
Hannish.....R.H.... Williams-
Brown
Smith.. ......F.B........ Rafter
The score by quarters:
1 2 3 4Total
Michigan .... 0 0 0 14-14
Syracuse ..... 3 10 0' 0-13
Touchdowns-Rafter, Zeiger, 2.
Goals from touchdown -M..han
Maulbetsch, 2.
Field goals-Meehan, 2.
Referee-Holderness, Lehigh. Um-
pire-Hinkey, Yale. Field judge-
Lynch, Brown. Had linesman --
Haines, Yale.
Time of quarters-15 minutes.
OFFERS PRIZES FOR CHEERS
Contest For New Michigan Yells Be-
gins Monday; Closes Thursday
Desiring to aid in the effort to se-
cure a number of new cheers for
Michigan, R. J. Scully, '12, of Chicago,
has placed in the hands of The Daily
a check for $10 to be distributed as
prizes in a contest to this end.
The alumus who visited in Ann Ar-
bor last week, stated that a few new
and spirited yells would g-far toward
arousing enthusiasm at the games, and
expressed the wish that the prize-
winning contributions might first be
put into execution at the coming game
with Washington.
Beginning Monday and lasting until
s o'clock Thursday night, The Daily
will receive any and all contributions
to the contest. These will be turned
over to the board, of directors of the
Athletic association, who will act as
judges of the contest. The results will
be announced in The Daily not later
than Saturday morning. A first prize
of $5.00, a second of $3.00, and a third
of $2.00, is offered for the three best
yells. All contributions should be ad-
dressed to the "Cheer Editor" of The
Daily. The number of cheers to be
submitted by any one contestant is
not restricted.
"GIPSY" SMITH TO WORK
FOR Y. M. C. A. IN FRANCE
(By United Press.)
Paris, Oct. 28.-"Gipsy" Smith, who
has evangelized all over the world,
will spend the months from November
till April in France doing ivaftgel-
istic work under the auspices of the
Young Men's Christian association. He
comes as a representative of the
Wesleyan Methodist church.

Presbyterian Church
HURON and DIVISION STS.
10:30 A. M. Sermon by Leonard A. Barrett
Theme-What Is In Thine Hands
NoonDr. Paul W. Harrison speaks to young men
Prof. Thos. E. Rankin speaks to young women
First-Methodist Church
A, W. Stalker, D. D. Minister Iy
mau
va us
se Mind; Bu ning Heart"
AN
o730-MWizard-Missionary fromn Arabia
Emuslin
HN iss
M In

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