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October 26, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-26

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I

ANN ARBOR-
PARTLY CLOUDY
AND COLDER

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UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
ThE ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

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VOL XXVII. No 21. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENT
PRESIDENTIAL STRAW Vu ETDA

STEFFES BL[iMS
AMERICN CPllITAL
XIAN MUSS
T. S. RESPONSIBLE FOR WRONGS
ON OTHER SIDE OF BORDER,
SAYS .JOURNALIST
LAND QUESTIONRESPONSIBLE
Mexican People Will Work Out Own
Salvation If Left Alone,
Declares Speaker

Simpson 's Team
Leads "Y' Race
An estimate of the number of mem-
bers in the student "Y" up to the end
of the second day in the campaign is
giren as 800, but a. much larger num-
ber is looked for when the results of
last night's canvass are totalled.
Teams under J. R. Simpson, '18; W.
M. Bell, '18, and O. C. Haywood, '17,
hold first, second, and third -places,
respectively, in the race for the high-
est number of memberships secured.
These teams have done exceptional
work through their persistent efforts.
Advantages offered by the associa-
tion this year are greater than ever.
In addition to the new building, a bene-
fit in itself, plans have been completed
for making the work of the associa-
tion more attractive to students. This
is especially true of the socialrservice
wcork carried on in Ann Arbor in
which all students interested may take
an active part.

FiRST BAND BOOST
TO BE HELD NOV13
Plan tq Send Band to Cornell With
Team on Proceeds From
Concert
H. C. GARRISON, '17, CHAIRMAN
"Send thae band to Cornell" is the
slogan adopted by those in charge of
the Band Boost to be held in Hill
auditorium on the evening of Friday,'
Nov. 3.
A smoother and snappier production
than ever before 'has been promised
for the entertainment, due to the
adoption of the plan to have the band
perform its part of the program and
then retire from the stage, leaving
ample space for the other features.
Each of the eight acts will follow the
preceding in rapid succession.

MCKIENSEN TAKES
IMPORTANT TOWNS
Chernavoda, Strategic Railroad Cen.
ter, Falls Before Continued
:Drive of Germans
WAY NOW OPEN TO BUCHAREST

With quiet, forceful eloquence, Lin-
coln J. Steffens, traveler, journalist,
and sociologist, last night told the
story, of Mexico to the audience of
more- than TOO' who gathered to hear
him in the auditorium of the Ann Ar-
bor high school.
The 'peaKer showed a masterly
grasp of the situation in Mexico, and
a complete ,understanding of Presi-
dent Wilson's policies toward that
country. Beginning with the over-
throw of Porfirio Diaz; h? described
in detail the details of the revolution,
the advent of American capitalists,
and the establishment of Poncho Ma-
dero, the impractical idealist. Mr.
Steffens briefly entered into a descrip-
tion of Madero's unhappy ending and
the events that led to the separation
of Villa from the armies of the north.
"Villa was induced to part from the
couse of the revolutionists," said Mr.
Steffens, "by the magnificient offers
made him by American capitalists.
These desired that the concessions and
advantages made them by the Diaz
regeme continue, and that the liberty
be taken from the Mexican people.
They were the ones most instrumental
In taking from the peons their com-
munal lands. Every counter-revolu-
tion has been financed by American
capital, and every raid over the bor-
der was plotted in this country long
beforehand. We are sending troops
into Mexico to avenge wrongs for
which we, primarily, are responsible."
The speaker outlined the policies of
Carranza with whom he traveled about
the country for a period of three
months. He graphically drew the
character of the leader, and asserted
that if left to work out the salvation
of his people, he would undoubtedly
meet with success, but if interferred
with by the intervention of a foreign
power, only more bloodshed and
carnage was to be looked for. Mr.
Steffen asserted that the land question
was responsible.
"The Mexicans are not a moral, but
an aesthetic people, they find no at-
tractions in personal accumulation of
wealth. They do not live to work but
merely work to live. Once they have
enough to satisfy their simple needs,
they are content. If left to them-
selves, they will develope a civiliza-
tion like to the ancient Greeks."
Following the lecture, Mr. Steffens
conducted a questionaire, and for 40
minutes proceeded ' to answer all
quiries put to him. These dealt with
Mexican legislation, with the hopes and
ideals of ,the people, and with their
customs and habits. He explained cer-
tain diplomatic moves on the part of
the United States, such as the landing
of the fleet at Vera Cruz, and the real
motivt back of the 'watchful waiting"
policy.
Hallowe'en Dance $1.25, Not $1.50
In yesterday's issue of The Daily
the price of tickets for the Hallowe'en
dance at the- Union, Friday night, was
stated as being $1.50. Instead, the
price is $1.25.

Hughes ?delivers
biggest speech

[akes Oration Originally Intended
Nov. 4, Wednesday Night
in Brooklyn

for

New York, Oct. 25.-Republican
'andidate Hughes made his biggest
1peech of the campaign tonight in
Brooklyn. It was a complete indict-
Y'ent of the Democratic party from his
standpoint, and a complete listing of
he promises of the Republicans. Orig-
nally the plan was to have Hughes
3pring his biggest speech at the wind-
,ip of the campaign Saturday night,
Nov. 4, in Madison Square Garden,
New York. It is understood, however,
that Hughes himself vetoed this plan.
q{e starts on his last important trip
tomorrow.
Chicago, Oct. 25.-Contributlons to
'be western department of the ' na-
ional Republican committee up to last
Saturday were $387,153, Frederick W.
Upham, western treasurer, announced
oday. Eight years ago the western
-ivision received $548,000 for the en-
tire campaign in the western division.
Chicago, Oct. 25.-With flour hitting
high at $9.70 a barrel wholesale to-
day, flourmen are looking for the pro-
luct to go to $10 a barrel before the
week-end.
Seattle, Oct. 25.-With a large pas-
-enger list aboard, the Pacific Coast
^ompany liner Governor went aground
*n a fog shortly before noon today off
Point Gray, near the entrance to Van-
'ouver Sound, while enroute from Seat-
tle to San Francisco. Officers-of the
steamship company say they expect
*o float the liner at high tide without
damage.
St. Louis, Oct. 25.-A resolution
nassed by the house ofi deputies to-
dlay asks all members of the Protestant
Episcopal church to refrain from the
use of all alcoholic liquors at all pub-
.lic banquets or gafherings. The reso-
tution was sent to the house of bishops
for concurrence this afternoon. The;
esolution did not ask abstainenee from
intoxicants in tho home.
St. Joseph, No., Oct. 25.-Criminal,
Judge Ryan dismissed venire in the1
Oscar McDaniel murder case this aft-t
ernoon, and continued the case to the<
regular November term of court. 7
Washington, Oct. 25-The questione
of the wages and hours of labor willj
be the first thing taken up by the joint
sub-committee of congress when it
meets Nov. 20 to take up inquiry into
the railroad situation, Senator New-c
lands, chairman, announced today. I

Two of the musical features have'
played the Keith circuit during the
past summer season, and in all likeli-
hood will accept an engagement for
the next. The other sketches are said
to be humorous in the main, and ex-
ceedingly clever in their execution.
The band will furnish the principal
attraction, and it is rumored that a
sextette will be recruited from its
ranks.
Herbert Garrison, '17, chairman of
the ticket sales committee, has an-
nounced that 200 men will co-operate
with him in disposing of the paste-
boards, and is planning a campaign to
cover both town and campus, begin-
ning next Monday, and lasting until
the date of performance. The price of
the tickets, ,which will admit to any
part of the auditorium, will be 25 cents.
David Shand, '18, will act in the
capacity of stage manager, while Sey-
mour B. Simons, '17E. has been se-
lected program manager, to fill the
place left vacant by Grant Cook, '17L,
who was forced to resign.

London, Oct. 25.-Armies of the cen-
tral powers struck crushing blows to-
day against the Russo-Roumanians.
Berlin this afternoon announced cap-
ture by Field Marshal von Mack-.
ensen's German - Bulgarian - Turkish
forces of .hernavoda, eastern terminusI
of the railroad bridge crossing the
Danube into Roumania. The victory
is considered one of the most Impor-
tant scored by the Teutonic forces
since Roumania entered the war with
the allies.
Only brief dispatches covering the
operatiots about Chernavoda had been
received, but the official accounts in-
dicate the Russo-Roumanian forces
suffered a disastrous rout. Large
bodies of Russian and Roumanian
troops are believed to have been cut
off in Dobrudja and are in imminent
danger of capture or destruction by
Mackensen.
Von Valkenhayn Advances.
Capture of the Chernavoda bridge
not only cuts off the retreat of the
allied forces, but also opens a way
for a drive on Bucharest, the Rou-
manian capital. Meantime the Aus-
tro-German armies of General von
Falkenhayn continue to advance from
the west in Transylvania. Berlin an-
nounced the capture of the famous
Vulkan pass after bloody hand-to-
hand fighting.
On the western front, developments
of the day were more favorable to the
^ause of the entente allies. Teutonic'
forces counter attacked fiercely north-
east of Verdun, striving to regain
ground lost to the French in a power-
ful smash yesterday, but all of their
attacks were defeated. The French
war office this afternoon announced
that all positions captured by the
French were strongly maintained. Ger-
mans are rushing strong reinforce-
ments to the Verdun front to protect
their lines from further onslaught.
Many regiments had been transferred
From the Somme front, according to
war office reports.

.
STUDENTS' DIRECTORY
TODG ON SALE TODAY
All Records for Early Publication
Broken by 1916-17
Staff
Defeating all previous records by
three days, the 1916-17 Students' Di-
rectory will go on sale at all book
stores at 4 o'clock today at the price
of 50 cents: One of the new fea-
tures of this year's directory is a stiff
cover.
The- directory staff, led by Philip
Warriner, '17, editor, and F. P. Ran-
dall, '19L, business manager, has
worked harder than ever in an at-
tempt to defeat the record time made
by last year's staff and to give the
campus the directory as early as pos-
sible. Much credit is also given to
the Ann Arbor Press for hustling
through the edition. 'Ihe first issue
was off press yesterday afternoon, but
the official sale was postponed until
today.
The raise in price, which was form-
erly 35 cents, is due to the stiff cover
in place of the flexible one used here-
tofore, and the increase in cost of pa-'
per.
MUNICIPAL FILM IS FINISHED
First Production of "Ann Arbor Days"
to Be Given Tonight

Directions for
Casting Votes
WHAT-A straw ballot on presi-
dentialnominee, prohibition for
Michigan.
WHEN-From 1 until 6 o'clock to-
day.
WHERE-Lits and graduate stu-
dents (men), corridor of Uni-,
versity hall.
Lits (women), Library.
Laws, law building.
Architects and engineers, en-
gineering building.
Medics, medical building and
university hospital.
Homeops, homeopathic hospital.
Dents, dental building.
Pharmics, chemistry and phar-
macy building.
BALLOTS-Women, green.
Men, white.
Faculty, pink.

ALL STUDENTS AND
FACULTY MEMBERS
TOU CASdT BALLOTS
VOTE EXPECTED TO CRYSTALIZE
SENTIMENT OF MID.
WEST ,
RESULTS IN FRIDAY'S. DAILY
Only Hughes and Wilson on Ballot,
But Other Candidates May
Be Voted For
Michigan's faculty and students will
today designate their favorite candi-
date for president and cast a vote for
or against the proposed state law pro-
hibiting the sale of intoxicants. . The
result of this straw vote is expected
to be a crystalization of mid-western
sentiment.
Universities, colleges, and political
institutions all over the country have
been conducting such balloting, and
the final counts will doubtless throw
much light on the probable outcome
of the November elections. With many
important and conflicting issues at
stake, more interest seems to have
been taken in politics in the last few
-nonths than has been evinced for
many years, this being especially true
'f student bodies.
In the voting which is to take place
today from 1 until 6 o'clock at various
stations on the campus, not only tht
,tudents, but the faculty as well, will
be urged to cast their votes inlicating
their political preferences.
In addition- to the ballot boxes al-
ready announced, two more have been
established for the convenience of stu-
dents in the Medical school. One of
these will be located in the university
hospital, the other in the homeopathic
hospital. Members of the faculty may
-ast their vote at any one of the bal-
loting places.
On the ballots are printed the names
of Charles E. Hughes and Woodrow
Wilson, but the committee of student
councilmen in charge of the voting
tate that the addition of any one of
the otler candidates names will cause
it to be counted in the final returns.
The other question to be voted upon
is whether the state of Michigan shall
adopt a prohibition policy.
Harold E. O'Brien, '17, will act as
chairman of the committee, and will
be assisted by W. B. Steele, '17D; S.
F. Attwood, '18E; C. W. Attwood, '17A;
H. L. Keim, '17M, and D. W. Sessions,
17L. Theo niti ~ of the b allnawl

DENT CLASSES HOLD ELECTIONS
Senior, junior, and fresh dents held
their class elections yesterday after-
noon in the dental building. The re-
sults of the elections were as follows:
Senior dents-President, A. S. Har-
rison; vice-president, H. Brunner;
secretary, C. R. Barron; treasurer, H.
J. Herrick,. and athletic manager, G.
D. Peters.
Junior dents-President, L. J. Bau-
man; vice-president, L. M. James, Jr.;
secretary, Miss H. M. Smith; treas-
urer, H. C. Cramer, and athletic man-
ager, J. O. Goodsell.
Fresh dents-President, J. D. 'Glov-
er; vice-president, C. T. Nelson; sec-
retary, J. L. Knapnan; treasurer, M.
H. Miars, and athletic manager, N. E.
Page.
JEWISH STUDENTS TO MEET
Dr. L. il. Franklin to Deliver Sermon
,t Meeting in Newberry
Hall Sunday
The first meeting of the Jdwish Stu-
dents' congregation for the school
year of 1916-17, will be held Sunday
night at 6:45 o'clock, in Newberry hall.
the same place that the meetings of the
congregation were held last year. Dr.
Leo M. Franklin, of Temple Beth El.
Detroit, will deliver the sermon, the
subject of which has not yet been an-
nounced.
Services this year are to be held
weekly, as heretofore. The singing
will be led by Mr. S. M. Becker, tenor
of the choir of the Detroit place of
worship. All are invited to attend.

Berlin, via Wireless to Sayville, Oct.
'-5.-German aeroplanes on the Somme
front made more than 500 raids Sun-
day, taking advantage of the fine
weather. In 202 air flights on the
Somme front 16 enemy planes were
shot down, and a number forced to
land behind their own lines.

Final steps in the preparation of "L""ne countinor t e Da ots will
Sofia, Oct. 25.-Our right wing has "Ann Arbor Days, the municipal begin promptly at 6 o'clock. Full re-
reached Caramurat and Dokuzoa, vil- Ang Areram, wee madeiat suits will appear in The Daily for
lages 180 miles northwest of Con- v the first run of the pictures before Friday.
stanza. Bulgarian infantry forces
representatives of the University and
pred50officersu37-0the Civic association at the Whitney WILSON CLUB SEEKS DEBATE
iashaecptrd50ofies 370theater last night. Some slight rear- CLUBSEEK
men, 30 machine guns, five locomotivesthate t ofghe.sce s'llbenec-
and 200 railroad wagons. Near Cara- essary, but everything will be in readi- Challenge for Public Discussion of
murat the Bulgarians dispersed Rus- ness for the first public showing at Presidential Candidates.
sian battalion number 275, capturing the theater tonight.
the commander and 800 men, and also The theatareer .f two Notice was received at The Daily
a Roumanian brigade and its com- tent t the r the leads offices yesterday from the Woodrow
mander. students at the UniversityWilson club stating that their chal-
being taken by Miriam E. Hubbard,
grad., and Rex St. Clair, '18E. Scenes lic e atepubsica n dfra
i-ENGINEERS ELECT OFFICERS taken of football games and the class public debate is still open and that
contests formed some of the best parts they will accept a challenge not later
Results of the junior engineer class of the film. A scene showing the late than Friday of this week.
Resuts f te jnio eniner cassDr. . B AnellandPreidet Hrry The question to be debated is: "Re-
elections held yesterday afternoon Dr. J. B. Angell and President arry solved: That Charles E. Hughes is bet-
were as follows: President," S. S. At- B. Hutchins in an interesting addi- ter fitted for the presidency than
wood; vice-president, J. H. Sharpe; tion. Woodrow Wilson." The organization
secretary, Miss Dorothy Hall; treas- The pictures will be shown for 'the is anxious to have some other club
urer, H. A. Knowlson; football man- first time at the Whitney. theater at accept the challenge as early as pos
ager, N. H. Ibsen; baseball manager, 7:30 o'clock tonight. 'They will be sible as arrangements for the affair
W. J. Piggott; basketball manager, H. shown Friday, Saturday, and Sunday must be made at once.
B. Haskins; track manager, Elmer with three performances daily, mat Acceptance of the challenge hould
Hardell; indoor baseball manager, inees at 3 o'clock, and night at 7:30 be sent to E. O. Snethen, president of
Fred Van Brunt, and class orator, R. I and 9 o'clock. Admission is 25 cents the Woodrow Wilson club31113 Forest
A. Cole. with no reserved'seats. avenue, phone 467-R.

STIFF COVER
AND
FIFTY PAGES
LARGER

"We Don't Like to Brag" But Here We Are'
The Students' Director
ON SALE TODAY AT 4 O'CLOCK

LOOK
Earlier than

1915 by 3 days
1914 by 5 days
1913 by 7 days
1912 by 37 days
1911 by 57 dlays

TENTS

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